• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • paul wheaton
  • Devaka Cooray
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Miles Flansburg
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Anne Miller
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mark Tudor
  • Pearl Sutton

Self-sustained homestead on 12.5 acres?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 24
Location: Texas
2
books homestead kids
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you for that link, Tyler.

According to that site, the following information was found about the land itself

"Anhalt clay, 1 to 3 percent slopes
Mean annual precipitation: 31 to 36 inches
Mean annual air temperature: 65 to 68 degrees F
Frost-free period: 220 to 260 days
Farmland classification: Prime farmland if irrigated "

my ignorant knowledge says that sounds like good soil?
 
Randy Coffman
Posts: 24
Location: Texas
2
books homestead kids
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I wanted to give an update,  in case anyone was wondering what we decided to do.

We had a realtor get us on the property,  and I was able to take pictures of the land, which my wife and I adored seeing on location.

The house was in serious need of remodel / renovation / repair.  The cost for the property plus the estimated potential cost to fix the house up was too much for us.

If the house wasn't there and the cost was just the land, we would have put in an offer.  

We will keep looking,  and if we find something else,  I will let you all see it.  Thank you to those who provided guidance and information.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2106
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
93
forest garden solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for the update. The 36in or rain that you get per year is nice. So keep looking in that area or somewhere with more rainfall. You will find it soon enough.
 
pollinator
Posts: 539
Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
69
bee chicken food preservation forest garden hugelkultur hunting
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Randy, make an embarrasingly low offer. We got our house that way, with a tractor thrown in. They can only say no. If the house is in serious disrepair in the country, there are few takers. You never know...
 
Randy Coffman
Posts: 24
Location: Texas
2
books homestead kids
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tj Jefferson wrote:Randy, make an embarrasingly low offer. We got our house that way, with a tractor thrown in. They can only say no. If the house is in serious disrepair in the country, there are few takers. You never know...



That was our plan, but they already received an offer before we saw it, so we couldn't lowball it too far if we were serious,  and a reasonable amount to drop wasn't enough to make up for the work needed. We didn't want to box ourselves into paying more than we were willing just to have a chance our offer was better.

The current owner got it earlier this year from an estate sale with the plan to renovate, but decided it was too much work and wanted out of it without losing money.

We will keep looking.  Hopefully find something with similar productive soil and acreage, but with what we are willing to pay for.
 
Tj Jefferson
pollinator
Posts: 539
Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
69
bee chicken food preservation forest garden hugelkultur hunting
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Smart. Don't overpay. Leave room for the unexpected. There are more fish in the pond...
 
Posts: 5
Location: North Country of NYS
food preservation forest garden goat
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
These are my thoughts regarding a self sustained homestead.  Your mileage may vary since I live in northern New York close to the Canadian border.  Think about those parts that would apply to you.  I have 67 acres of wooded area, about 5 that would be considered pasture although it isn't that great and the remainder wetlands with a creek and drilled well.  

First off it takes (so I've read) 10 acres to have a sustained wood lot for heat where I live.  

Regarding animals, I would go with smaller types that you would at least have a chance of raising their food needs and being able to sustain a self contained breeding population.  Rabbits are very efficient meat producers.  One buck and 2 does would probably be enough for starters.  Goats are another dual purpose animal that are very efficient for meat and milk.  Poultry for eggs if you so desire.  I think with these 3 animals you would fulfill your animal protein needs.  I'm into pollarding and coppicing for tree hay for my goats and hope to eventually eliminate the need for hay.

Fruits and veggies.  Just look for types that grow best in your climate and go with open pollinated.
 
Posts: 263
Location: 4b
47
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Larry Streeter wrote:
First off it takes (so I've read) 10 acres to have a sustained wood lot for heat



My grand parents heated exclusively with wood,  as well as cooking with it for many years, and my grandfather said something very similar.  He told me with 8 acres of good woods,  you would never need to cut a living tree.  My parents heat with wood exclusively, and agree.  

As for the rest of your post,  spot on.
 
Larry Streeter
Posts: 5
Location: North Country of NYS
food preservation forest garden goat
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Trace Oswald wrote:

 "He told me with 8 acres of good woods,  you would never need to cut a living tree."  

I started thinning out my wooded area for firewood after retiring.  I soon realized there were hundreds of cords of dead wood that was available.  It's amazing how much is there after looking so now that's all I use.  For the most part it's already dry and true enough, no need to cut living trees.  I burn EVERYTHING that's dead including evergreens, basswood, whatever.  That wood that is too far rotted to burn I use for hugelkulture material.  

 
Posts: 5
Location: New Braunfels, TX
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I will be buying acreage to homestead between Austin & San Antonio (preferably west of I-35) and am looking for others of like mind who would be open to buying adjoining properties so we can share farm equipment, skills, food, etc. and to tend each other's homesteads in each other's absences and care for each other like family when SHTF, in our home life's or society as we know it... Whatever the case may be. You are jumping in with both feet (braver than me!) whereas I plan to start with improving soil first, then trees, berries, buildings, fencing, roads, water harvesting and lastly, add the meat, eggs and milk via small animals like chickens, ducks and goats. Larger farm animals may come into play down the road but the successful homesteaders I hope to be like someday (!) warn against all at once. Focuses on getting good at a few things rather than end up doing badly at a lot of things:)  But I'd like neighbors with your tenacity! I have a rock star realtor who happens to be my best friend who will be helping me locate property next month. Some parcels are likely to be farm land getting split up and have adjoining acreage for sale. My budget is max of $300k for min of 10 acres, home, and outbuilding(s). Would you be interested in combining our efforts to create or locate neighborhood of likeminded preppers/homesteaders?
 
garden master
Posts: 2053
Location: USDA Zone 8a
404
bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting cooking purity trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

 Oak trees - I added a picture of the land.  you can see the tree clusters I am referring to.  I am with the belief that that amount of them is a hinderance to effective pasture rather than an assistance.  Maybe a thinning of them would be an  overall improvement.  I don't want to remove everything if I don't have to.  I like trees. even trees that don't directly supply food for the farm.  I like that having some can be shade too.  I just don't want my general love of trees to be the reason I don't have enough pasture for my livestock.  I actually want to plant as many trees as I can around the border of the property



Being in Zone 8b, those oak trees may be the only trees that will survive without lots of water.  When planting trees keep in mind that you will need to water them.

Also those trees in the pasture will provide your animals a place to get out of the hot sun.  They will thank you for the shade, especially the babies.

I don't know if the animals that you plan to pasture like acorns, though if they do, you have an additional food source.
 
Larry Streeter
Posts: 5
Location: North Country of NYS
food preservation forest garden goat
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Kristy League wrote: the successful homesteaders I hope to be like someday (!) warn against all at once. Focuses on getting good at a few things rather than end up doing badly at a lot of things:)  

I 2nd this viewpoint wholeheartedly!

 
World domination requires a hollowed out volcano with good submarine access. Tiny ads are optional.
Rocket Oven plan download
https://permies.com/t/rocket-oven-plans
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!