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Fleece: winter sowing alternative?

 
Posts: 30
Location: Yambol, Bulgaria
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I have two raised beds empty at the moment.  Several years ago I did winter sowing and it worked good, but I have trouble getting all the plastic containers here.

I am thinking that the principle  to sow in winter is in order to grow healthy plants, let them be stratisfied, without disruption from animals or wind.

What would be the problem with covering my beds with some arched mesh, covered with garden fleece?  the moisture would still come through, the seeds would still get light but not be disturbed by the elements? Also it would be easier, just sow in rows and mark each row with marker, not all kinds of different containers, duct tape, etc. etc.

Anyone think of a reason this would not be as good as plastic milk bottles, etc/?  I'm in Bulgaria, no plastic milk bottles and most plastic containers a bit too limp here.

would really appreciate feedback, would start sowing towards middle of January.
 
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Without a transparent vapor/liquid barrier, I think you will miss out on a lot of the solar heat accumulation.
That might be fine.
If there are glass jars or bottles available, they are an option,  but cutting them will take more work.
If there is plastic sheets available , you could build "traditional" low tunnels.
But the garden fleece seems like a good idea.
More durable than plastic sheets, strong enough to be sewn together.
I might try this with  my 55 gallon sub irrigated planters.
 
Manfred Ramault
Posts: 30
Location: Yambol, Bulgaria
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I think the fleece also keeps temperature a bit higher and acts as a buffer, also allows moisture to pass through, I don't think there is a risk of drying out since the bed is quite deep. also there is less risk of overheating as there is air flowing through the fleece.

I think what I'll do is try it, and experiment, doing a few things both the fleece method and the plastic container method and see which works best.

I also have glass I can put over the bed, but the problem with the glass is that it breaks quite easily, lost one pane already, and also, I would really have to keep an eye on the bed regularly in case of overheating, also we get quite strong winds here, and glass is much more likely to blow off, unless I put rocks on, which then makes it cumbersome to open and close each time.
 
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