garrett lacey

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since Nov 22, 2011
Edmonton Alberta
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Recent posts by garrett lacey

I'd like to chime in that American Elm seems to be a poop beast. I was throwing my dogs' poop into a buried rubbermaid container with holes drilled in it (was a worm bin). I am moving out of my place so I dug it up the other day, and I had a very difficult time removing it because the roots of the large american elm (well beyond it's dripline) had infiltrated the bin and formed a thick mat of roots digesting the poo.
5 years ago
Definitely a crabapple. I suppose you could make jelly or cider with it (probably with some other apple varieties), or perhaps use it as a source of pectin.
5 years ago
http://whatdoino-steve.blogspot.ca/2009/07/cottonwood-untapped-alaskan-resource.html


That link suggests that someone had reasonable success spinning a blend of cotton/cottonwood. I wonder if there are other things that would work to blend with it, flax maybe?. The issue with the cottonwood fibre seems to be that it may have shorter fibres making it difficult to spin.
5 years ago
Ive been composting some from a local roaster for a while now, treating them as browns. Seems to be working out!
5 years ago
Looks exactly like Kamloops.
5 years ago
The stippling is reminiscent of Whitefly damage, or perhaps some other homopteran..

The mystery plant looks to me like Lily of the Valley -edit- definitely looks more like the False Hellebore.
5 years ago
Just eating them straight off the tree? I was peeling the skin off the dry ones that were falling off the American elm in my front yard, and ate a few. I remember experiencing some minor throat irritation though it could have been unrelated or just in my head.

The seed seems promising as a staple if it could be collected efficiently. Perhaps by coppicing, or maybe spreading some kind of sheet to catch them.

I was inspired to ask about elms by the thread about Box Elders. Box elder and Siberian elm are the two most common 'weed trees' that grow around here, and after realizing the utility of the Box Elder, I was curious about the Siberian elm.

On a side note, has anyone else noticed the high incidence of bacterial infection on pruning wounds on elms? Almost every cut made results in soft, orange bark below the cut extending down quite some distance. I don't know what this says about the tree, but it could be a clue to something.
5 years ago
Just wondering if anyone has first hand experience using elm for any purpose. Siberian Elm is an abundant weed tree here, and American elm is a common planted tree in my city.

From what I've found through Plants for a Future, the seeds are edible and high in protein, wood is rot-resistant in water, inner bark & leaves edible. Anyone have experience cultivating mushrooms on Siberian elm?
5 years ago
Paul touched on dish detergents in this podcast: a subject that I have troubled over somewhat. Today I found a promising solution: http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~dna/Makekefir.html#potash-lye
I've seen goutweed doing just fine under a large spruce.. I recall it having some kind of use, thought I can't recall specifically. Trouble with going under conifers is that (at least here) no rainfall gets down there.
5 years ago