Irene Bensinger

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since Jan 07, 2012
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dog forest garden trees
Near Mt. Rainier, WA
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Recent posts by Irene Bensinger

D. Logan wrote:I've been wracking my brain all week trying to think of something I am curious to know about vegan permaculture that I can't readily find by two minutes on Google.
I am curious about vegan systems, especially permaculture ones, where domesticated animals are actively employed.



This is a year late, but this is what we've done. We love animals and wanted a petting zoo. So when undertook our retirement homesteading adventure we collected rescued animals: two donkeys, a pony, a bummer lamb, a kid also rejected by her mother, and three llamas. We purchased chicks (no rooster) and goldfish (mosquito control agents and things of beauty). We set up a Warré hive in a sheltered corner of a near pasture and eventually a swarm took up residence in it. Various rescued dogs/puppies and kittens/cats have joined slong the way.

We never have thought of the animals as belonging to us, but rather as adopted wards whose care and safety are our responsibility. They have shared our lives and brought us invaluable cross-species lessons in establishing trust and communication; the furry ones have given us warm friendships. The hens, free to run in a large 'yard,' safe from predators, have laid hundreds of organic eggs over the years. These we take to the nearest food bank, rationalizing that if hungry people would like to eat eggs then fresh organic ones from happy hens are better for them than eggs from enslaved and miserable hens.

The bees look after themselves, keeping their stores of honey for their over-winter food supply. They swarm from time to time, but that's strictly thrir own bee business. We've planted plenty of herbs and flowers to add to their wild foraging (we live in the woods) and rejoice when we see them around us in the garden.

The manure from the large animals, composted, feeds the plants in the garden and produces large, healthy 'weeds' which get handed back over the fence to the critters.

So all this means we're not purists of any sort, just doing our part in a peaceful cooperative cycle in the woods.
2 years ago

K Putnam wrote:I wasn't quite sure what forum was most appropriate for this question. I have piles upon piles of plastic pots ranging from small seed starting flats to large pots that held trees. Even if I held back enough for anything I wanted to propagate myself, I still have what looks like a heap of trash. A few of them have a recycling stamp on them. The rest do not. Is there some kind of pot return program that I might not know about? The amount of plastic involved in putting in a garden from purchased starts, shrubs, and trees is overwhelming.



Just wanted to say Hello to a neighbor. We're east of Eatonville.
2 years ago

Tyler Ludens wrote:I'll need to acquire a family somehow...



Same goes for us, aged 77 and 79. But how??
2 years ago