J Abatis

+ Follow
since Jan 15, 2013
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
0
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
3
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by J Abatis

Cool project, thanks for sharing and keep posting
I would check for other wells in the area at http://mbmggwic.mtech.edu/. The account is just an email and password no money or anything required. Hopefully there are a few wells in the general area to give you an idea on depth to water and geology. Also be sure you file with DNR once you have the well to protect your water right. Even if your property is on the Rez you will need to file. Once the water compact is done they may grandfather the existing filings. Any new wells after that most likely will have to be approved by a committee. I am down by St Ig and my well is 140 Ft deep and yields 25 gpm. I am a professional geologist and will say that I believe dowsing by the right dowser can be helpful. Sediment geology is highly variable in glaciated areas but the reality is your water could be much deeper than the reach of an excavator.
6 years ago
I lost a nice Katahdin ram to coyotes or wolves (gut ate left ram alive) in June. I installed a number of niteguard lights around the property and I am currently raising a couple of Kangal crosses as guard dogs. My recommendation is give the coyotes/ wolves no break. My neighbor ranchers and I gave the coyotes a break in my area as they mouse but as soon as they have pups they get nasty. So far with niteguard no losses, but I now have no mercy for predators. Talk radio, a waste of time socialist or conservative.
7 years ago
My Katadhin like poplar and pine leaves with their grass. I have not thought of haying trees as I am working to graze year round with minimal hay, even here in Montana. But would appreciate success stories with tree branch hay.
If you live in an ag area there should be a number of equipment dealers that rent equipment. Even large farms rent equipment or outsource certain operations because the capital investment does not pay off if you only need to use the machine once or so a year, but the activity is essential. I think it is often better to ask a neighbor farmer if you can pay him/her to come in and do something for you as that way they feel you value them and also you won't break their equipment. Once you own equipment you will find things break. Generally equipment from a rental outfit will be ready to go to work and most agreements cover who pays for wear parts such as cutting edges, etc. My own experience is the large rancher/farmer in my area has been very generous to help. I buy some hay from them and I have got to know them. I ask questions about when do you do certain things like drag harrow your field. The next thing you know they are offering you to use their harrow if you want. I find that even the big guys with thousand of acres want to be good neighbors and also they like to see other people that love the land and want to be productive.
7 years ago
Modifying an existing drill to meet your needs sounds like a cost effective way to go. I have looked here is the USA for small no till options and the new equipment starts around $4K and up. I have not found any used units here in Western Montana. I have thought about buying a used drill and basically cutting it in half. I had good luck frost seeding clover last spring but with the grass seeds you really need to drill them or prepare beds and broadcast seed and cultipak. But that defeats the advantage of no-till drill. Please post your results.
7 years ago
Very nice. Thanks for sharing.
7 years ago
The system needs to ensure that the water is "pasteurized" if you are counting on safe drinking water. Therefore, the system needs to be well designed in regards to residence time/heat to kill the bio hazards etc. If you have a little extra electricity a UV filter can do a great job on biological risks with very little energy. What your talking about sounds like a batch type operation which could be okay if you didn't need much drinking water. Also is the approach practical in the none heating season when you don't need to use the stove?
7 years ago
Also consider distance to power supply, etc. Most States have good web sites with information on water wells for domestic/ag use, regulations (like how close to septic and property lines) lists of licensed drillers etc. As stated above get multiple quotes and maybe a reference from someone they have drilled for in your area. You get to pay for a dry well attempt so be sure they know/have success in the area.
7 years ago