Erin Zosu

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since Jan 21, 2013
Joined military after high school, have since retired. Currently, working in Entomology. Looking forward to paying off my land and starting my permaculture way of life.
Texas
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Recent posts by Erin Zosu

Hello Darlene,
Check out this site: http://www.pelletmillshop.com/
6 years ago
Picture of cantaloupe growing on the fence...I counted five in that photo.
6 years ago
Hello Mark,
Anything is possible even with bermuda grass. I was able to work with my bermuda while growing some cantaloupe. Believe it or not I harvested 45 cantaloupe from 9 plants even while they were growing in a sea of bermuda grass. I refused to move the cantaloupe vines because the movement would disrupt the plants growth. Since I didn't move the vines I couldn't cut the bermuda grass with the mower or weed eater. So I decided to let the two compete with each other. The cantaloupe vines started growing above the bermuda grass. I had cantaloupes in the grass and on the wire mesh fence fabric I had nailed to my wooden privacy fence. I have attached a few photos so you get an idea. Although the pictures don't show it. I later planted three peach trees and one apple tree in the middle of the yard. They did quite well. I also planted chamomile around the base of each tree together with basil. I just don't have those pictures available.
6 years ago
Hello,
By far my favorite YouTube site is Manjula's Kitchen.
Her recipes are easy to follow and she lists her ingredients.
Enjoy: http://www.youtube.com/user/Manjulaskitchen?feature=g-high-u

Somebody mentioned Naan:

7 years ago
Hello Karla,
Perhaps a reinforced concrete structure may fit your stormy and insect proof needs. When you mentioned Kansas, the first thing that came to my mind was Greensburg, Kansas which was leveled by an F5 tornado. About the only structure that survived that storm was the grain elevators. If I am not mistaken, they are constructed using reinforced concrete. Not sure of the associated costs, but you could use their design as a guide.
Here's a link of a photo depicting the devastation at Greensburg. The grain elevators stood tall as a testament that a reinforced structure can withstand an F5 tornado.
http://mw2.google.com/mw-panoramio/photos/medium/2493685.jpg
The elevators are tall structures, but I can imagine a single level structure can be worked out. Since it is practically made of concrete and reinforcing steel, your insect concerns are limited. Also, pests need food, water and shelter. Eliminate in one of those three and you won't have an insect problem. Key thing is ensuring all access points to your home are sealed. If the pests cannot get in and are not brought in...then you won't have a problem. Wish you well.
7 years ago
Hello,
Looks like an amaranth (red root pig weed) which has had its center stalk removed and has grown lateral branches. Quick way to id the plant is to pull it out roots and all. It will have a central tap root with branching side roots. The portion of the root just below the surface will be red in color with the rest of the root being white. The seed heads displayed in your photo will have small spikes that are sharp when handled with bare hands. Reference link: http://oregonstate.edu/dept/nursery-weeds/weedspeciespage/REDROOT/habit_3_750.jpg
7 years ago
Hello,
We had similar situation.
In our case, we used ashes.
The ashes help form a clot and keep the flies away.
Hello,
Have seen to many parasitic worms come out of grasshoppers, crickets, and roaches to consider any of these as food substitute.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn7927-parasites-brainwash-grasshoppers-into-death-dive.html
7 years ago
Hello,
Has anyone tried using an automatic feeder for their chickens?
Check them out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Q4W9_n8Iq4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb4otSRqHCQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1FLVnWxDwM

Rat on one of them.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVDR4Eqziyc
Goodluck!
7 years ago
Hello,
Cedar waxwings love hackberry tree berries and mistletoe fruits. They usually eat them in the fall and winter months during their annual migrations.
7 years ago