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Alfrun Unndis

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since Jun 14, 2013
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Recent posts by Alfrun Unndis

I somtimes sprinkle some dried nettle on my fermented chicken food. The chickens eat it right up. I'm not sure if it's a 'like' thing, a hungry thing or maybe the absorbed liquid makes everything taste the same.
5 months ago
I’ve been doing wheatfree sourdough for over a decade and I got kinda attached to the microbes and worried I wouldn’t be able to re-domesticate a wild batch that tasted the same. So I dehydrated a spoonful or two and mixed it with some flour and froze it. That one time I needed to restart a batch I just re-hydrated the thawed frozen starter and everything was fine. No need to wait days/weeks for a new microbes to set up housekeeping.

I got the idea from an article about eastern European immigrants to the US. It said that folks spread their hometown sourdough starter on a cloth and let it dry and they then brought that cloth with them so they could continue to have the bread they loved in their new home.

The experts say that eventually all the sourdough microbes will be local. But if you dehydrate and freeze some you’ll save a bit of time.
6 months ago
I found that the same grains produce different thicknesses of kefir with different "brands" of milk. The raw milk dairy I use rarely gets gel like but the local regular dairy's pasturized milk gels really well. The supermarket ultrapasturized organic milk is somewhere in between. Try changing your milk "brand".

Are you getting pine forest/river patterns of solids on the sides of your glass when you drink your kefir, then it's be kefired no matter the thickness.

My kefir grains tend to take a vacation once a year typically mid October, they just don't produce any kefir, it's probably the related to the season change. It usually takes a week for everything to get back to normal. I thought I killed them the first couple of years.

9 months ago
I remember sidewalk "windows" in New York City from when I was a child. They were usually near the access port doors, in the sidewalk, used to load things into the basement. They were some sort of glass brick, about 4 inches square. I'm not sure how they were supported but folks would walk on them without a care. So it is possible.

As a sidenote I also remember wooden escalators, they still show up in my bad dreams sometimes. Scary stuff.
10 months ago
Use a piece of tape. either the sticky paper/plastic you already pulled off or some other light weight tape (packing, masking). Stick the tape to a small  part of the label, leave some tape to grab onto  and pull off the tape rapidly. The sticky label residue will stick to the tape and jar is clean. You can also tap goo off by tapping the label goo with the tape and pulling it away quickly.

This is a slow process small piece by small piece but satisfying.

This works on hard surfaces that can't be wet. I just used this process to remove stickers from a used laptop I just got. It looks beautiful now.
11 months ago
I have dehydrated kefir grains at low temps and stored them in powdered milk in the freezer for years and have had them revive.

Kefir cream is really tasty just use cream instead of milk. Then you can go on to cream products like butter and ghee. The butter is tasty the ghee is heavenly. Ghee stores unrefridgerated for a really long time.

Critters love kefir. Dogs, chickens and some cats in my household. They eat the grains too, except for the cats.

Draining kefir gives kefir cheese (so called) and whey. I use the whey in bread and some soups. The cheese goes on bread or veg.

Remember kefir is fermented and fermentation is a storage technique. So it keeps a long time.
11 months ago
I thought I'd post a pic of my handmade shoes. They're a little rough looking but it's my first attempt and wasn't difficult. They're made out of wool felt and rubber soling. I'll make another pair to perfect the pattern, then I'll try leather. I basically used scissors, hand sewing needles and a sewing awl.

I think if you've made something small with your hands you could do this.

I'm looking forward to not spending a fortune for shoes that fit. Meanwhile these will do for getting the mail and collecting eggs.
1 year ago
is it ok to feed them all fermented feed?

I’m not sure what you meant so…
I only have chickens so I don’t know about fermented feed and other fowl.

I ferment all my feed and never feed unfermented feed. But I also give the chickens sprouts, scraps (kitchen and garden) and then they also forage.

I’ve considered raising larvae for the frozen months but larvae just smell really bad to me. Makes me wish I had a warm out building where I could hold my nose, they are so nutritious and delicious.

Good luck on your quest.
2 years ago
I ferment my feed which is supposed to increase available nutrition and therefore decrease consumption.  Also sprouting seeds increases bulk and some say nutrition too. Then there is sprouting and then fermenting. All  methods require a bit more time and planning (but not much) on the human’s part. There are many videos available on both methods (youtube of course). Folks use fermentation on store bought feed and if the feed has whole seeds try sprouting some. If the birds eat less and get the same nutrition you might be able to keep the organic and not pay more than gmo/pesticide stuff. Keep your principles and not pay high prices.
2 years ago
I’ve been making up all of the food for my chickens and they’re healthy and content but I would really like to understand the daily minimum nutrition required for one chicken.

I am going a bit dizzy from the sources I’ve been able to find because they talk about, for example percent protein, but never seem to state the volume to feed one bird. As if feeding a hen a bushel or a teaspoon daily are the same as long as they contain 16% protein.

Does anyone know or have a reference they could recommend that gives the daily nutritional requirements for a single chicken in grams (not percent)? I’m sure breed, activity, age and size probably matter, just like us humans.

I’ve got bared rocks and heritage RIRs. Also I’m in suburban New England so they don’t get to forage daily. Unless someone can supervise an outing they eat what I give them and whatever dares to flit into the run. So I worry sometimes about everything being ok.
2 years ago