Win a copy of For the Love of Paw Paws this week in the Fruit Trees forum!

Shari Greer

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since Feb 23, 2014
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Recent posts by Shari Greer

Lomita is on the border with San Pedro and it is nice street. It's at the foothills of Palos Verdes. Originally farmland, my place is from 1926 in bungalow style. I tried posting a picture but that did not seem to work.
I am also considering moving into the small place and let out the larger (relatively) 2bed / 1 bath house as well. This is a transitional time for me so not sure which way I'll end up. The right way, I'm sure
Thanks for the bookmark!
5 years ago
I have three small houses on a city lot and the smallest is available. Private room with bathroom/ private entrance. There is room to grow/garden-urban style. Creative alternative spaces also ok. Located in Lomita which is in the far South Bay region of Los Angeles near the beaches & harbor. Cob rocket oven coming soon!
Close to public transportation and Whole Foods/Trader Joe's and Fresh N Easy.
Anyone travelling by that needs a short-term rental is also welcome to contact me - the most unsustainable element in my life is the mortgage.


5 years ago
I agree with most of what was said re Palmdale and Lancaster. Also to look at Ventura County and up the central coast. Fillmore is still a farming town and lower cost. An area further out (2.5 hrs) that is very inexpensive and great for a permie site is Lake Isabella. I have looked at that quite a bit. Because of elevation ranges you can find a wide variety of micro-climates. To be within an hour and a half of L.A. is relative to what time you drive in or out. Gorman is another area which is higher elevation and gets snow but is closer to LA.
5 years ago
Thank you for the links Satamax! I read most of what's there and will go back and re-read again. The one thing I think that is different in the Crimean Oven approach is that it was imperative (in their minds) that the trench be built on a slope. Not a big one, but a slight up angle. This is what helped to pull the heat through such a long distance. I wonder how much impact a slope would have on the RMH pipe in the floor?
5 years ago
Nice image! I want that for my next living room!
5 years ago
I was thinking if it was a cob construction dwelling, the trench/bench could be built into the earthen floor. I wonder if that would be helpful in a wofati situation? As a back-up? It would provide more open floor space at least. Yurts make sense too - I'll check that posting out
5 years ago
I just came across this article about a Crimean Oven used in the U.S. Civil war of 1860's. They have something going on with the trench through the tent creating a draft to pull the heat through. According to the article it made very diffused heat that was equally felt throughout the tent.
Perhaps the concept can be applied to create radiant floor heating with a Rocket heater? Interesting history and tech anyway!
You can read the article here:
http://www.notechmagazine.com/2014/03/crimean-ovens.html
5 years ago
Hi - I'm a new member of Permies here, been listening to Paul's podcasts daily and planning on creating a permie homestead as soon as I get my job back online. I would love to attend the conference but since not currently employed - money is beyond tight. Is there any need for a volunteer or some other way I could work my way in? It sounds like an amazing gathering. Or if someone ha an extra ticket - maybe we could work something out?
Thanks!
5 years ago
Hi - me too! I donated for both the cards and the videos and just realized it is a different email address on Kickstarter. I just updated my email in the Permies account to match so hopefully it will catch up with each other eventually.

Thanks!

Shari