Marc Mindy

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since Feb 05, 2016
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Our mission at The Walking Herbalist is to present a lighthearted, conversational approach to cultivating plant allies in the quest for a balanced and fulfilled life. As a husband and wife team, we want to share our personal adventures, growth, discoveries, and knowledge in all things herbalism, with the hopes of inspiring our audience. Our favorite topics include foraging wild food, forest bathing, nature walks, and outdoorism. We embrace a personal philosophy that feet can never be too dirty, there is always another trail to hike, and well-being starts with the smell of pine. Our goal is to bring a self-reliant, independent, DIY approach to herbalism.  We broadcast and blog from both our seaside homestead in South Boston, as well as our satellite “bunker” in Western Massachusetts, giving us free access to the best of both the urban and rural plant worlds!  We implore you to grab a cup of freshly steeped tea and join us for chats on healing, medicine making, wildcrafting, herbal medicine, farming and gardening, and finding local herbs.
South Boston, Massachusetts
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Recent posts by Marc Mindy

In part I posted the topic because I have a little trouble fleshing if out. Maybe because I think, boy it seems like a good idea, and then instantly look for the flaws? Rather than accept it may just be a good idea?

I think that most golf course communities are (gated) HOAs with the golf course a separate business entity. I can see how this model could work with a farm. Especially in the heart of a gainfully employed (since they can afford a house) community who presumably inherently likes the idea of ag and fresh local food. A csa would be an easy sale.

The negs to me would be if it becomes a commjne, which is not a concept I particularly care for. If it is more like recreating a "town" of yesteryear, I like it.

Maybe the young/beginning entrepreneurial farmers out there should reach out to their local developers about this concept?

Btw: interesting bit on "too much fruit to eat"!

Mindy of The Walking Herbalist
3 years ago
Hi:
So, a recent topic that came on my radar was this concept of "Agrihood". Essentially a planned community centered on a farm, rather than the other popular HOA type where houses ring a golf course. I have mixed feelings on this, and was quite curious what other people thought.

Mindy
3 years ago
Wow! That is a great idea! It does make me wonder about the viability of a community-supported borrowing club. Even a (reasonably priced) rental program. An interesting venture for those with access to commercial property...

Mindy
3 years ago
@Steve Bossie: What a fantastic group of plants! I wish we had room for more trees/shrubs...

While most definitely not ornamental (almost anti-ornamental, haha!), we cultivated lambsquarters (yup, goosefoot!) in order to collect seeds for indoor growing. We have Chenopodium microgreens growing as we speak! I do not think I would recommend it...the quantity of the seed harvest was not super inspirational.

Mindy
3 years ago
Hi John!
Welcome to the Catch 22 world we all are in! (Well maybe not all of us, but the city people at least...) It is an amazing dichotomy and frustration that arises between wanting and needing the city, and wanting and needing to be as far away from it as possible.
Marc and I are in Boston, and as an example there actually is a homesteading world to be had here. It just is that urban homesteading looks a bit (lot) different that those folks out on the range.
Have you reached out to other like-minded people in your city? Surely they exist! We sidewalk-shufflers all dream of the vast great yonder! Take stock of all of the resources in your area. For example, in Massachusetts, we have an organization that entrusts and conserves property for the alleged benefit of society down the line. Well, one of their programs is a Master Urban Gardener program. Guess the type of people that are in this program? (Many homesteader types!)
So, I say, while you wisely work off your schooling, take stock of all of the organizations in your city that have a homesteader / gardening / herbalism / farming / outdoor bent. And keep pushing the envelop on indoor growing!

Two other thoughts:
1) We bought a travel trailer and stuck it permanently on a campsite in the country, ~ 1 hour from Boston. Think, "wicked cheap summer home" in the woods. Boo ya!
2) You are clearly a successful young man. BUT, it is not too late to change careers. Think carefully about what you really want. Get your cards read (Just kidding!)

Take care,
Mindy (of The Walking Herbalist)
3 years ago
I'll jump on this zombie thread!

We love fresh tea made from foraged Comptonia peregrina (sweetfern).

Mindy
(of Marc & Mindy of The Walking Herbalist)
3 years ago
Hi:
I am new to the site, so I recognize I am posting on a topic that is a few months old.

This is how we grow dandelions:
1) collect seeds from heads.
2) prepare a shallow tray with seed starter mix.
3) sprinkle dandelion seeds in mix (microgreen style) and grow under LED shop lights (our standard urban set-up).
4) top water until the plants become to crowded to do so and then bottom water after that.
5) transplant to garden after ~4 weeks. -OR- eat the microgreens!

We have had some problems with mold growth on some batches.

Mindy
3 years ago
We had some supermarket garlic starting to sprout on our counter. So we planted it last week in containers and put it under our LED grow lights. Trimmed and ate the scapes yesterday... we'll see how it turns out!

Mindy
3 years ago
Just a big hello! We are new to the site (posting at least) and wanted to make introductions! Hopefully this is the correct place!

Kindest,
Marc & Mindy
The Walking Herbalist
3 years ago