Gordon Hogenson

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since Aug 25, 2009
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Recent posts by Gordon Hogenson

Regarding the heat released when water condenses in the underground pipes, yes, the amount of heat released depends only on the amount of water that condenses, not the temperature per se. The heat released for a given amount of water is called the latent heat or enthalpy.  The value is a constant for the type of fluid.

These systems work much like the heat pump we have for our house. It seems like a great idea and I am very interested in hearing about how the systems are working in practice.

I wonder if the greenhouse must be of a certain size to have enough thermal mass in the soil and length of pipe to be effective.  Ostenkowski's successful example in Colorado was quite large, 72 by 26 feet.
1 year ago
I have this apple. However, my trees are quite small, have not borne fruit yet. I could possibly still give you a piece of scionwood. I'm not sure if it is too late to try grafting. Where are you located?

I obtained the scionwood from Nick Botner, however that was a few years ago and Nick Botner was just retiring and selling his famed scionwood orchard. The fruit has also been described as having a pear-like flavor. It is supposedly more banana-like than Winter Banana, which apparently doesn't have that much of a noticeable banana flavor.
2 years ago
Goats will generally drop the alfalfa stems on the ground, and this becomes the bedding in the barn. We clean ours out every six months or every year and use it for making compost. Goats will eat more stems if the alfalfa is finer, which is usually true of the later cuttings. At a feed store in late summer you can find later cuttings. I haven't generally seen organic alfalfa available, though.

You can also get alfalfa pellets. In that case they won't have a choice to drop the stems. But then you have to provide some other bedding material. To us it seems easier to let the waste alfalfa be the bedding material.
From what I can tell, Usnea does not fix nitrogen. Apparently, the key is whether the lichen incorporates cyanobacteria (blue green algae). Usnea forms an association with an alga but not a blue-green alga. Lobaria, another common large lichen, does fix nitrogen.
6 years ago
I have known that Usnea lichens (common in the crowns of Black Cottonwood here in the Pacific Northwest) fix nitrogen, but does anyone know if these new studies suggest that ALL lichens fix nitrogen, or just certain ones?
6 years ago
If you have bird attracting plants (berry and seed producers, such as Eleagnus, mulberry) and nearby perches, such as posts on a fenceline, you'll get phosphorus-rich bird droppings. Also, add a birdbath or other water source, bird houses, and bird feeders.
6 years ago
A tethered animal is easy prey to predators or neighborhood dogs. Just a few weeks ago, a goat in the neighborhood was killed by a couple of loose dogs. I would not tether an animal unless it was inside a fenced area already and you just wanted to control its location.
6 years ago
You might want to look into tapping the native Big Leaf maple for syrup. Here is one resource:
http://www.blmaple.net/
6 years ago
The latter two look very much like Mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris.
6 years ago
If I understand correctly, a 501c3 has a elected board, which means that you can get voted out of power and lose control of the organization. There are people with agendas who do take over non-profits and repurpose them for their own ends. Be sure that you really understand the implications of any formal structures that you set up. A 501c4 may be a better non-profit option, as this has an appointed board that means you keep control. Of course you should consult an appropriate expert to verify all this.
6 years ago