Rhiannon Drake

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since Jan 09, 2017
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Summary

Paul continues his call with Ash Jackson, Ashley Cottonwood, and Jen Richardson on the subject of the Click.

Despite people claiming that they’re tired of the perpetual hair-on-fire mode from the sense of urgency, they tend to continue with what they’re doing regardless of the flame, and over time the height of the flames has drastically subsided.  In the haste to get neck-deep, some projects tend to get abandoned and wind up just taking up space and time to either finish them after the person working on them leaves, or removing them, either way igniting more hair.  Jen suggests adjusting the concept to “wouldn’t it be cool…” in an effort to stem the sense of desperation.

Everybody wants to join a community that’s already full, but the only way to be in that community without it costing tens of thousands of dollars is to join it early, but you don’t know which communities are going to stick around.  After reaching the tipping point, the goal is less “trying to create a paradise” and more we’re there enough that suddenly there’s a flood of people that want to be a part of this, and growing pains become an issue.  This is why keeping the place tidy and not littered with trash, half-finished projects, and tools is important to Paul.  Not just so that it looks nice and all the tools don’t go missing, but to try and make the land more inviting and reach that tipping point sooner, to try and get the labs self-sufficient both monetarily and in terms of food production.  

Relevant Threads

Community forum

Wheaton Labs forum

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Dr. Hugh Gill Kultur
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
anonymous
Kerry JustTooLazy
Jocelyn Campbell
Wade Luger
Sasquatch
Kyle Neath
Chris Sugg
havokeachday
Bill Erickson
Dominic Crolius
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
G Cooper
Penny McLoughlin
Ash Jackson
Mehron Kugler
Lisa Goodspeed
Mark
Pasquale DeAngelis
Sean Benedict
Greg Martin
Rita Bliden
Dana Martin
Candace Dahlk
Keith Kuhnsman
Eric Tolbert
Ruwan Nanayakkara
Polly Jayne Smyth


Listen Online
Download

Get all of the Podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Paul continues his call with Ash Jackson, Ashley Cottonwood, and Jen Richardson on the subject of the Click.

They start off talking about community and how their relationships changed after the click and there’s a consensus that maintaining relationships with the un-clicked is usually more trouble than it’s worth.  If they at least don’t try and stage an intervention, then keeping sort-of in touch can be nice, but all present said that overall relationships were less important than saving the planet.  In short: most communities suck.  

Wheaton labs has enough of a residual income stream that it mostly keeps itself afloat, albeit with occasional cash injections.  Ash has a work-y job that pays more than minimum wage, but finds it neutering to be doing something for so long that has nothing to do with permaculture.  Ashley tried seasonal work, but still found it miserable to corral pyromaniacal campers and pick up broken glass.  Jen teaches tiny people to how to ski.  That’s nicer.  Paul was a software engineer, a job that perhaps changes more than any other and he went to large conferences about it and spent a great deal of time staying on top of the job, but after the click, he didn’t want to spend all his time staying on top of a job that the was increasingly apathetic about.

Jen brings up that her dad is a major builder, but doesn’t trust natural building materials beyond wood.  Part of the reason why a lot of people have these hangups is that they have to feel the finished article in order to believe that it’s possible.  You can say that a RMH heats a room on 1/10th the wood, but they won’t believe you until they’ve been in a room with one working.

Relevant Threads

What is a Residual Income Stream?

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Dr. Hugh Gill Kultur
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
anonymous
Kerry JustTooLazy
Jocelyn Campbell
Wade Luger
Sasquatch
Kyle Neath
Chris Sugg
havokeachday
Bill Erickson
Dominic Crolius
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
G Cooper
Penny McLoughlin
Ash Jackson
Mehron Kugler
Lisa Goodspeed
Mark
Pasquale DeAngelis
Sean Benedict
Greg Martin
Rita Bliden
Dana Martin
Candace Dahlk
Keith Kuhnsman
Eric Tolbert
Ruwan Nanayakkara
Polly Jayne Smyth


Listen Online
Download

Get all of the Podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Paul calls up Ash Jackson, Ashley Cottonwood, and Jen Richardson to talk about what he calls “The Click”.  The Click can be described as the sound made by the switch in one’s head as permaculture ideas turn from “cool” and filed alongside the new Thai restaurant, or that car, and instead the ideas click together and you realise that you’ve been living your life backwards.  And now you are hard-wired to do a 180 and live your life the right way.  For Paul, the Click happened over 5 seconds, but for Ashley it was closer to a year due to her resisting it under the belief that it couldn’t be that easy.  All agree though, that the 180 was very sudden and total.

For all the good that the Click can bring, they all agree that not having it can be a good thing, as they’re all joyfully suffering from it.  None of them would go back and un-click themselves even if they could, although they should probably point out that that it has the potential to be a relationship killer, particularly if the partner doesn’t ever experience the Click.

Something that is common, if not universal, to people that have just had the Click is a sense of frustration about their situation.  Paul realised that he couldn’t do what he needed to on his 80 acres and couldn’t afford the land he did need, Ash still isn’t living in a town with no cars that can feed itself, Ashley was in a trailer park trying to raise chickens, and none of them had the manpower to do what they wanted to in their lifetime.  Also, people tend to think they’re all crazy.

Relevant Threads

Real Estate thread

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Dr. Hugh Gill Kultur
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
anonymous
Kerry JustTooLazy
Jocelyn Campbell
Wade Luger
Sasquatch
Kyle Neath
Chris Sugg
havokeachday
Bill Erickson
Dominic Crolius
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
G Cooper
Penny McLoughlin
Ash Jackson
Mehron Kugler
Lisa Goodspeed
Mark
Pasquale DeAngelis
Sean Benedict
Greg Martin
Rita Bliden
Dana Martin
Candace Dahlk
Keith Kuhnsman
Eric Tolbert
Ruwan Nanayakkara
Polly Jayne Smyth


Listen Online
Download

Get all of the Podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Paul continues his call with Ash Jackson, Ashley Cottonwood, and Jen Richardson on the subject of the Click.

Despite people claiming that they’re tired of the perpetual hair-on-fire mode from the sense of urgency, they tend to continue with what they’re doing regardless of the flame, and over time the height of the flames has drastically subsided.  In the haste to get neck-deep, some projects tend to get abandoned and wind up just taking up space and time to either finish them after the person working on them leaves, or removing them, either way igniting more hair.  Jen suggests adjusting the concept to “wouldn’t it be cool…” in an effort to stem the sense of desperation.

Everybody wants to join a community that’s already full, but the only way to be in that community without it costing tens of thousands of dollars is to join it early, but you don’t know which communities are going to stick around.  After reaching the tipping point, the goal is less “trying to create a paradise” and more we’re there enough that suddenly there’s a flood of people that want to be a part of this, and growing pains become an issue.  This is why keeping the place tidy and not littered with trash, half-finished projects, and tools is important to Paul.  Not just so that it looks nice and all the tools don’t go missing, but to try and make the land more inviting and reach that tipping point sooner, to try and get the labs self-sufficient both monetarily and in terms of food production.  

Relevant Threads

Community forum

Wheaton Labs forum

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Dr. Hugh Gill Kultur
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
anonymous
Kerry JustTooLazy
Jocelyn Campbell
Wade Luger
Sasquatch
Kyle Neath
Chris Sugg
havokeachday
Bill Erickson
Dominic Crolius
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
G Cooper
Penny McLoughlin
Ash Jackson
Mehron Kugler
Lisa Goodspeed
Mark
Pasquale DeAngelis
Sean Benedict
Greg Martin
Rita Bliden
Dana Martin
Candace Dahlk
Keith Kuhnsman
Eric Tolbert
Ruwan Nanayakkara
Polly Jayne Smyth


Listen Online
Download

Get all of the Podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Paul continues his call with Ash Jackson, Ashley Cottonwood, and Jen Richardson on the subject of the Click.

They start off talking about community and how their relationships changed after the click and there’s a consensus that maintaining relationships with the un-clicked is usually more trouble than it’s worth.  If they at least don’t try and stage an intervention, then keeping sort-of in touch can be nice, but all present said that overall relationships were less important than saving the planet.  In short: most communities suck.  

Wheaton labs has enough of a residual income stream that it mostly keeps itself afloat, albeit with occasional cash injections.  Ash has a work-y job that pays more than minimum wage, but finds it neutering to be doing something for so long that has nothing to do with permaculture.  Ashley tried seasonal work, but still found it miserable to corral pyromaniacal campers and pick up broken glass.  Jen teaches tiny people to how to ski.  That’s nicer.  Paul was a software engineer, a job that perhaps changes more than any other and he went to large conferences about it and spent a great deal of time staying on top of the job, but after the click, he didn’t want to spend all his time staying on top of a job that the was increasingly apathetic about.

Jen brings up that her dad is a major builder, but doesn’t trust natural building materials beyond wood.  Part of the reason why a lot of people have these hangups is that they have to feel the finished article in order to believe that it’s possible.  You can say that a RMH heats a room on 1/10th the wood, but they won’t believe you until they’ve been in a room with one working.

Relevant Threads

What is a Residual Income Stream?

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Dr. Hugh Gill Kultur
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
anonymous
Kerry JustTooLazy
Jocelyn Campbell
Wade Luger
Sasquatch
Kyle Neath
Chris Sugg
havokeachday
Bill Erickson
Dominic Crolius
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
G Cooper
Penny McLoughlin
Ash Jackson
Mehron Kugler
Lisa Goodspeed
Mark
Pasquale DeAngelis
Sean Benedict
Greg Martin
Rita Bliden
Dana Martin
Candace Dahlk
Keith Kuhnsman
Eric Tolbert
Ruwan Nanayakkara
Polly Jayne Smyth


Listen Online
Download

Get all of the Podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Paul calls up Ash Jackson, Ashley Cottonwood, and Jen Richardson to talk about what he calls “The Click”.  The Click can be described as the sound made by the switch in one’s head as permaculture ideas turn from “cool” and filed alongside the new Thai restaurant, or that car, and instead the ideas click together and you realise that you’ve been living your life backwards.  And now you are hard-wired to do a 180 and live your life the right way.  For Paul, the Click happened over 5 seconds, but for Ashley it was closer to a year due to her resisting it under the belief that it couldn’t be that easy.  All agree though, that the 180 was very sudden and total.

For all the good that the Click can bring, they all agree that not having it can be a good thing, as they’re all joyfully suffering from it.  None of them would go back and un-click themselves even if they could, although they should probably point out that that it has the potential to be a relationship killer, particularly if the partner doesn’t ever experience the Click.

Something that is common, if not universal, to people that have just had the Click is a sense of frustration about their situation.  Paul realised that he couldn’t do what he needed to on his 80 acres and couldn’t afford the land he did need, Ash still isn’t living in a town with no cars that can feed itself, Ashley was in a trailer park trying to raise chickens, and none of them had the manpower to do what they wanted to in their lifetime.  Also, people tend to think they’re all crazy.

Relevant Threads

Real Estate thread

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Dr. Hugh Gill Kultur
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
anonymous
Kerry JustTooLazy
Jocelyn Campbell
Wade Luger
Sasquatch
Kyle Neath
Chris Sugg
havokeachday
Bill Erickson
Dominic Crolius
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
G Cooper
Penny McLoughlin
Ash Jackson
Mehron Kugler
Lisa Goodspeed
Mark
Pasquale DeAngelis
Sean Benedict
Greg Martin
Rita Bliden
Dana Martin
Candace Dahlk
Keith Kuhnsman
Eric Tolbert
Ruwan Nanayakkara
Polly Jayne Smyth


Listen Online
Download

Get all of the Podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Paul sits down with Dez Choi and Jen Richardson and talk about their viewing of the first “DVD” of the four “DVD” set Permaculture Skills by Ben Falk.  The group had high expectations, and they were exceeded.  Disclaimer: Paul backed the Kickstarter 4 years ago.

They feel that the parts where Falk was speaking weren’t worth writing down, but instead getting a transcript due to the sheer information density.  The guest speakers were a more mixed bag, but overall seemed to be aiming at a different audience than Paul.  This seems to be a recurring issue with him – a lot of people seem to greatly appreciate things he doesn’t.  They note that the videography looks very good, but the film has problems with audio normalization (there’s some places where the volume in one shot/scene is quite different from the next).

Paul is bothered by the phrase “common sense” – if it was common, not only would it not be a phrase, but if permaculture is common sense, it would be done everywhere and permaculture wouldn’t be a phrase either.  Jen points out that that using the phrase indicates that the speaker believes themselves to be right, but can’t articulate how they’re right, so they hide under “common sense” as if it were a Jedi mind trick.  

Paul remembers visiting a place that was worked on by some apparent permaculturists that abandoned the place for some reason as an example of two things.  First: the reason why you should avoid living on friends/family property as relationships often go south and end up with you leaving all your work behind before it bears fruit.  Second: that even if you don’t call what you’re doing permaculture, it may well be close enough that when left alone it will become self-sustaining with a rich harvest.


Relevant Threads

Permaculture Skils by Ben Falk

Earthworks forum

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Dr. Hugh Gill Kultur
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
anonymous
Kerry JustTooLazy
Jocelyn Campbell
Wade Luger
Sasquatch
Kyle Neath
Chris Sugg
havokeachday
Bill Erickson
Dominic Crolius
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
G Cooper
Penny McLoughlin
Ash Jackson
Mehron Kugler
Lisa Goodspeed
Mark
Pasquale DeAngelis
Sean Benedict
Greg Martin
Rita Bliden
Dana Martin
Candace Dahlk
Keith Kuhnsman
Eric Tolbert
Ruwan Nanayakkara
Polly Jayne Smyth


Listen Online
Download

Get all of the Podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Paul gathers Scott, Jen Richardson, and Josiah Kobernik get together to watch the movie “Gather” which is about people trying to re-discover their Native American roots and some of the issues they face.  A lot of this part of the podcast is spent talking about the politics brought up in the film, which reminds Paul of his younger days in which he was mostly angry at bad guys, rather than building good things instead.  

Paul saw a show 15 years ago about five families trying to get set up in the Montana wilderness with one week of training, and did so poorly that a nearby native tribe gave them a couple of deer that the families weren’t allowed to hunt.  Paul was hoping that the movie would be about a similar group, but one that had been let to get further along.

The group feels that while protests can be useful for some issues, many other or larger issues require novel solutions, and while protests draw attention to problems, they often don’t offer solutions and thus get swept under the rug.  Thus leaving the protest and making the alternative can have a larger effect than the protests could on their own.  

Paul spotted someone titled Master Forager during the intro finding seeds who had a pillowcase on her, which got him excited because it’s almost certainly used for pillowcase threshing.  The community in the movie doesn’t even have a grocery store – only a gas station style convenience store which is laden with sugary foods and drink, and a fair bit of the movie is about making a café that serves traditional Apache foods and locally sources the ingredients.


Relevant Threads

Northern Native American Agriculture thread

Native American Herbal Healing/ Foraging for Health thread

Small Scale Grain Threshing thread

Tending the Wild - A book on a similar topic

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Dr. Hugh Gill Kultur
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
anonymous
Kerry JustTooLazy
Jocelyn Campbell
Wade Luger
Sasquatch
Kyle Neath
Chris Sugg
havokeachday
Bill Erickson
Dominic Crolius
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
G Cooper
Penny McLoughlin
Ash Jackson
Mehron Kugler
Lisa Goodspeed
Mark
Pasquale DeAngelis
Sean Benedict
Greg Martin
Rita Bliden
Dana Martin
Candace Dahlk
Keith Kuhnsman
Eric Tolbert
Ruwan Nanayakkara
Polly Jayne Smyth


Listen Online
Download

Get all of the Podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Paul calls Jen Richardson up to talk about the rocket mass heater in the tipi, its history, potential improvements, and possibly either a rebuilding it, or building a whole new tipi and RMH.


Built seven years ago to prove that they heat in a different way, it can make the tipi feel like 50F while it’s -26F outside, even when the fire went out eight hours ago.  Five years ago, they had the idea for a stratification chamber – have a small exhaust coming off of the lower part of a large chamber so that it keeps the hot air in longer and the cooler air is exhausted.  Three years ago the RMH started to show much less draw, so Ernie took it apart and found that the core had mostly dissolved due to the perlite melting.  The core was rebuilt with orange firebrick, but had to be shaved down two years later to improve airflow.

Theory is that with a stratification chamber in the tipi RMH, you could further reduce fuel consumption by half, however this seems to require further improvements to the core and remove the three-minute-riser and burn tunnel with moulded ceramic versions.  

Cold plugs happen when the outside air is warmer than the inside air and are characterised by being harder to light and smoking inside after a couple of minutes.  Cold plugs are common in the tipi due to it being uninsulated.  They can be helped by putting the vertical exhaust close to the barrel so that it heats up earlier and makes a full draw sooner.

Paul goes on a tangent regarding well digging and the problems he’s currently facing with getting one along with taxmen.


Relevant Threads

Tipi RMH thread

Cob forum
Rocket Mass Heater forum

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Dr. Hugh Gill Kultur
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
anonymous
Kerry JustTooLazy
Jocelyn Campbell
Wade Luger
Sasquatch
Kyle Neath
Chris Sugg
havokeachday
Bill Erickson
Dominic Crolius
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
G Cooper
Penny McLoughlin
Ash Jackson
Mehron Kugler
Lisa Goodspeed
Mark
Pasquale DeAngelis
Sean Benedict
Greg Martin
Rita Bliden
Dana Martin
Candace Dahlk
Keith Kuhnsman
Eric Tolbert
Ruwan Nanayakkara
Polly Jayne Smyth


Listen Online
Download

Get all of the Podcasts in convenient, giant zip files
Subscribe on iTunes

Summary

Paul sits down with Dez Choi and Jen Richardson and talk about their viewing of the first “DVD” of the four “DVD” set Permaculture Skills by Ben Falk.  The group had high expectations, and they were exceeded.  Disclaimer: Paul backed the Kickstarter 4 years ago.

They feel that the parts where Falk was speaking weren’t worth writing down, but instead getting a transcript due to the sheer information density.  The guest speakers were a more mixed bag, but overall seemed to be aiming at a different audience than Paul.  This seems to be a recurring issue with him – a lot of people seem to greatly appreciate things he doesn’t.  They note that the videography looks very good, but the film has problems with audio normalization (there’s some places where the volume in one shot/scene is quite different from the next).

Paul is bothered by the phrase “common sense” – if it was common, not only would it not be a phrase, but if permaculture is common sense, it would be done everywhere and permaculture wouldn’t be a phrase either.  Jen points out that that using the phrase indicates that the speaker believes themselves to be right, but can’t articulate how they’re right, so they hide under “common sense” as if it were a Jedi mind trick.  

Paul remembers visiting a place that was worked on by some apparent permaculturists that abandoned the place for some reason as an example of two things.  First: the reason why you should avoid living on friends/family property as relationships often go south and end up with you leaving all your work behind before it bears fruit.  Second: that even if you don’t call what you’re doing permaculture, it may well be close enough that when left alone it will become self-sustaining with a rich harvest.


Relevant Threads

Permaculture Skils by Ben Falk

Earthworks forum

Support the Empire

Help support the empire and get all of the podcasts in a bundle here in the digital market at permies.

To support production of these podcasts, make a donation here at Paul's Patreon page.



This podcast was made possible thanks to:

Dr. Hugh Gill Kultur
Eivind W. Bjørkavåg
Suleiman, Karrie, and Sasquatch
Bill Crim
anonymous
Kerry JustTooLazy
Jocelyn Campbell
Wade Luger
Sasquatch
Kyle Neath
Chris Sugg
havokeachday
Bill Erickson
Dominic Crolius
Julia Winter, world's slowest mosaic artist
G Cooper
Penny McLoughlin
Ash Jackson
Mehron Kugler
Lisa Goodspeed
Mark
Pasquale DeAngelis
Sean Benedict
Greg Martin
Rita Bliden
Dana Martin
Candace Dahlk
Keith Kuhnsman
Eric Tolbert
Ruwan Nanayakkara
Polly Jayne Smyth