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Trace Oswald

pioneer
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since Sep 20, 2018
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Recent posts by Trace Oswald

I tried it once.  It's one of the most vile things I've ever smelled.  Now I chop and drop comfrey where I need it.  I'll never make it again.
30 minutes ago

Tatyana Piven wrote:My question is how to choose a right handle for this tool.



They are very easy to make.  The site where you buy them has step-by-step instructions here:

How to make handle...
5 hours ago

John Weiland wrote:Joylynn,

Just an FYI in case it's useful information.  My wife uses those carts a LOT to pull buckets of feed between animal shelters.....and was getting tired of the flat tires.  So upon purchase of a new wagon, I routinely replace all 4 wheels with "flat-free" wheels of the same size.  You may have to search a bit, but places like TSC, Fleet Farm, Northern Tool, etc.....any of the bigger farm and hardware dealers will have these often in stock and they should look the same size and have the same axle bore as your originals.  They do cost a bit more, but can save headaches in the long run.



Harbor Freight carries a lot of them too, for really good prices.
21 hours ago

Rosie Carducci wrote:I hope it's ok to revive this discussion.  I"m just now reading through PDM for the first time.

It seems to me that much of the section on Zone and Sector Analysis applies more to a much larger property than I am envisioning for myself, or at least one with much more variation in climate and elevation.  We haven't purchased property yet, but we will likely be starting with about an acre or less of essentially flat land.  Should we be actively looking for something with more slope?



In my mind, starting with flat land makes many things easier. Some of my land is flat(ish), some is slightly sloped, and most is much steeper, to nearly impossible to walk.  The steep areas create opportunities for things like check dams to possible small ponds and the like, but overall, I think flat land is much easier to work with.  Erosion problems can be non-existent, catching water is much more easily done, land doesn't need terracing.  If you find land that you like, I certainly wouldn't discount it because it's flat.

James Freyr wrote:Dang William that really blows. Here are my thoughts and suggestions. I advise against buying roundup ready anything, that just puts money in bad peoples pockets and supports that industry. If you really think he did this, and may do it again, I suggest a trail cam, or two! Without proof anything is just hearsay and speculation but if you are able to get photographic evidence and proof that he is intentionally spraying your plants beyond his property line, then you are able to take real action and seek damages, which I believe any judge will award in your favor if pictures come across their bench. And pictures from a trail cam may show that there is no nefarious agenda or ill intent and it is just herbicide drift, which I think is terribly unfortunate.



Herbicide drift is illegal too.
22 hours ago

Spencer Miles wrote:I realize my verbal descriptions are a bit obtuse :)

You got me wanting to do something, rather than talk about doing something - cf. my signature line thing - Last summer, I cleaned up the "garden" at the University (the quotes are because, like it or not, suburbanite undergrad kids are all talk hence the need for me to go clean someone's project that they half-completed, then left to tweet about how green they are...) I ended up with some free PVC, among other things...

So! Twenty minutes, a chunk of rope and some electrical tape - and I built a wonky Octagonal-Catenary-Reciprocal-Dome-Tensegrity!! (O.C.R.D.T... Ocdirt? Ocridt... ??)

It has no foundation, thusly I used rope. The rope would not be there of there were some nice buttresses due to some earthbag or tire or concrete knee-wall.

One picture is overall, one is closeup to show the weave, one is from inside to show the star-ish pattern, and one is where I squished it to show that you can mess with the arcs to make.

Put some ties or bolts at the intercises, and again cover it with the "hypar" DIY concrete cloth... My neighbor said it looks like a tent and I thought that was great - it's like a concrete tent!

I realize it's unlikely that anyone other than me would be very enthusiastic about such a screwy looking thing, and yes - it's probably been done before. I don't care! It's mine! MINE!! HAHAHAHAHAAAAA!

But, anyone can use it if they want :)



You need to write a book showing how to build one of these start to finish.  I'll be your first customer.  The first one I want to try is a dog house that keeps my dogs safe if high winds blow a tree onto it.  Ideally, it would be kind of like an igloo, with a sort-of tunnel entrance that has a 90 degree turn in it to stop wind from blowing in.
1 day ago

Skandi Rogers wrote:I have a similar thing to that cart, I hate it. If you turn sharply with a load it will tip over, it is VERY heavy to pull, 4X the friction of a wheelbarrow and pulling it for any length of time twists you round as you can only pull with one hand. I've only taken it 1 mile to the shop to pick up a new gas flask and that was horrible I wished I had taken the normal wheelbarrow even though you have to carry some of the weight yourself with them.



I guess it really is a matter of right tool for the job.  Carrying heavy loads, I've tipped over far more wheelbarrows.  I find that with a wheelbarrow, I'm doing more of the work on ground that isn't level.  Going downhill, you have to hold the handles up and pull back on the wheelbarrow, where going uphill, it is much harder to push than pull in my opinion.  On uneven ground, with any amount of weight in a wheelbarrow, it gets stuck in every rut, and you have to throw your body weight into it to get over the hump or rut or whatever.  Again, a heavy load in those conditions makes it very hard to push the wheelbarrow, and greatly increases the chance you will tip over while your full body weight is leaning into the load, rather than lifting straight up on the handles.  My lady, that weighs about 120 lbs soaking wet, can use the cart with loads she can't budge with a wheelbarrow.  

I don't really agree with the 4x the friction statement.  With a well designed wheelbarrow, on level ground, the one wheel is taking all of the weight.  If you are on a surface that isn't very solid, the one wheel sinks in much more than the four wheels will.

I guess each person would have to try both and decide for themselves.  I will say, for me, since we got the cart, I use it far more often than I use the wheelbarrow.
1 day ago

Wiley Fry wrote:

Trace Oswald wrote:I bought this Gorilla cart for my lady, and we both really like it.  Much more stable than a wheelbarrow, holds more, and it is much easier to pull a load for a longer distance than to push it.  We use it for everything, including moving heavy loads of rocks.  With a heavy load of rock, if you are going uphill, you may have to use one person to push and one to pull, but short of that, we find it much easier to use than a wheelbarrow, and it fits through smaller spaces.  The sides come off easily for flat loads
that won't fit in the cart with the sides on.
Gorilla cart on Amazon



How's it's turning radius? I always worry about agility with four-wheeled carts.



We are both happy with it.  It's hard to see how the front axle is attached in the picture, but it will turn in a complete circle with the back wheels staying in roughly the same place.  
1 day ago
I bought this Gorilla cart for my lady, and we both really like it.  Much more stable than a wheelbarrow, holds more, and it is much easier to pull a load for a longer distance than to push it.  We use it for everything, including moving heavy loads of rocks.  With a heavy load of rock, if you are going uphill, you may have to use one person to push and one to pull, but short of that, we find it much easier to use than a wheelbarrow, and it fits through smaller spaces.  The sides come off easily for flat loads
that won't fit in the cart with the sides on.
Gorilla cart on Amazon

1 day ago
I just ordered both sizes.  I'll post a review after I've tested them out.
1 day ago