Gabe Gordon

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since Oct 01, 2018
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forest garden trees foraging
Extreme Southern Central Georgia, U.S. Zone 8b
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Recent posts by Gabe Gordon

Mike Barkley wrote:These might be good places to find them.

https://www.victoryseeds.com/pea_pigeon.html

https://www.mrcseeds.com/pigeon-pea-seeds/

http://www.reimerseeds.com/pigeon-peas.aspx





      This is almost exactly what I was looking for, thank you! Especially that last link, seeds in 85 days, that's what I like to see! I could probably get two crops off of those in one year. In other news I have also managed to acquire the rather elusive variety known as "Georgia-2" that I had been originally searching for, by contacting the University of Georgia in Tifton, specifically the horticulture department, who put me in contact with the Dr. who developed the Georgia-2 cultivar, who finally put me in contact with a company licensed to grow and sell the seed, and anyone else can send me a pm if they are interested.

This year I planted pigeon peas in the garden, to see if the variety I got is one that can produce seed before it freezes in November. In the probabal event that it is not such a variety, I have begun researching what varieties are suitable for growing here. What I have found is there are MANY, with the absolute best candidate for Georgia being a variety so named “Georgia-2”, followed by a good but not-as-good variety “Georgia-1”. I have not however found anything about where I can go about actually finding such a variety, so again I call upon the folks of permies! Do any of you in the United States (excluding I suppose most of Florida, Hawaii, and tropical territories) grow pigeon peas such as these or have any clue where/how I might find some? They are a wonderful plant that I grew with wild success in south Florida and they would make a great addition to the new homestead in Georgia if I can find the right varieties.

Gabe Gordon wrote:Extreme southern Georgia, zone 8b. HOT, humid, and long summers, with tons of rainfall, and a bit swampy.
I have found blackberries growing prolifically in the wild, as well as winged sumac, wild grapes and maucadines, red Chokeberry, and a few blueberry patches even, seeming all to do well. Pecans grow all over the place too, and I’ve seen several lemon trees around here producing very well. On my property we have planted lots of mayhaws and elderberry, which love it here, including the western blue elderberry. I’ve also got a few American persimmon trees and some red mulberry trees doing really well



   To update my own list here, more than just a few blueberry patches are growing! They grow like weeds here, I cant walk 10 feet without finding a small bush. Although this year some late winter warm spells had most of them blooming too early and a poorly timed frost got most of them, and the birds got the rest. But the handful of berries I did harvest were the sweetest blueberries I have ever eaten. Also growing wild and prolifically I have found blue HUCKLEberries(see pictures), more tart than the blueberries, but still sweet and delicious, also apparently more resistant to early blooming and birds because they're all still loaded with berries, even after my daily harvests.
   Asian persimmons also grow well, white mulberries, even have a black mulberry doing well even though I heard they don't like the humidity- mine seems to be happy. I have some "cold hardy" edible bananas that I am excited about, grow and produce fruit in 9 months, frost kills them to the ground, spring warmth sprouts them again and they repeat the process. I'm also going to test grow some Date Palms, because ive seen them grow downtown here and even produce some good fruits despite the humidity, as well as Texas Persimmons to see if they'll do well in the humidity (if anyone has experience with these or knows anything else about them, I appreciate all info!) and then some date plums because I like all these cool persimmon relatives, so ill update on those eventually.
1 month ago
Thank you for that article, the one from Purdue university has been the only one I could find. After giving it a read it looks like you are correct. I suppose in my excitement at the prospect of finding a morus rubra I completely overlooked that it could be morus nigra, and  upon reinspection of my own tree, I agree, much as it pains me, the leaves are indeed too cordate to align with a rubra, and look exactly like the pictures of a morus nigra in the article you linked. Apologies everyone, for the false alarm.
Ah well, the search continues! At least I have 6 other mulberry trees (including nigra now I guess! 😉) to keep me company in the meantime
1 month ago

Johannes Schweinhardt wrote:  
If you don't mind me asking, what characteristic(s) did you use to identify what you purchased as a morus rubra?



The leaves were the first give away, very tight and sharp serrations on the edge, matte in appearance,  slightly fuzzy underneath and generally a very rough leaf alltogether. The leaf buds also look pretty spot on

https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/fnr/fnr_237.pdf
1 month ago
UPDATE: It took some searching but I have in fact found a red mulberry at a great nursery about two hours from me (they also do online business and I highly recommend them) called Just Fruits and Exotics, here’s the link for anybody else interested: https://justfruitsandexotics.com/product/wacissa-mulberry-tree/
2 months ago
Extreme southern Georgia, zone 8b. HOT, humid, and long summers, with tons of rainfall, and a bit swampy.
I have found blackberries growing prolifically in the wild, as well as winged sumac, wild grapes and maucadines, red Chokeberry, and a few blueberry patches even, seeming all to do well. Pecans grow all over the place too, and I’ve seen several lemon trees around here producing very well. On my property we have planted lots of mayhaws and elderberry, which love it here, including the western blue elderberry. I’ve also got a few American persimmon trees and some red mulberry trees doing really well
5 months ago
  I am trying to find information about the toxin in elderberry seeds, and what effect, if any, tincturing in alcohol has on it. What I have found, seems conflicting. Article after article saying do not eat or use raw elderberries, seeds are toxic, etc. and even one source: https://franklininstituteofwellness.com/proper-elderberry-syrup/ , that suggests the only way to use elderberry is medicinally is by thoroughly cooking it and making a syrup so that “all” toxicity is destroyed, and basically says outright do not make tinctures as the berries (dried or raw) do not get cooked first.
 On the other hand, I see TONS of people advocating tinctures, sharing tincturing recipes, and sometimes even claiming that alcohol denatures the glycoside and makes them safe but I cannot find a single source proving that, only the opposite, actually, that the alcohol would extract and preserve the toxin too. However, I have also not seen a single claim of anyone getting violently sick from using an elderberry tincture, even if those same people can or have been made sick eating the raw berries. So, I’m at a bit of a loss here. If anyone has any experiences or more information to share it would be greatly appreciated!
6 months ago

William Schlegel wrote:I have blue elderberry and eastern black elderberry (canadensis) in my yard. Blue elderberry grows all the way from Western Montana South to Southern California and beyond.

Stark Brothers says zones 4-8 for Nova and York.

If they don't flourish try Canadensis

https://www.fnps.org/plants/plant/sambucus-nigra-subsp-canadensis



I actually have plenty of other elderberries, 6 wild and 6 “John” elderberry, (and I did actually just get 4 blue elderberries!) so I know there’s plenty that flourish here, and I do plan to get other cultivars like Adams and bob Gordon. My main concern was just that it’s too hot down here for those two specific cultivars because they originated so far north, but we definitely have plenty of moisture here, lots of rain year round and humidity, so as long as they’re heat tolerant I’m hoping they’ll do well! Everywhere I’ve read says zones 4-8, I just wanted to see if there was anyone successfully growing it in this climate, because they are apparently the best “commercial” varieties and I am in the process of starting an elderberry farm, so I want to get the most productive varieties
6 months ago
Not technically a tree, but, elderberries will do quite well when left on their own, in fact some of the more wild cultivars may insist upon it! I would also look into mayhaws, they produce extremely well (more berries than you’re gonna know what to do with) with basically little to no pruning or care, and they are native to that region, whether the land is a little dry or severely swampy a mayhaw will do just fine on its own
6 months ago