• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Dave Burton
  • Dan Boone
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
  • Mike Barkley
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think if we get a lot of input from everyone here, this could be a super valuable resource for figuring out which fruit trees and berries will grow best in your area.

You are in the right spot if you are in a Temperate climate hardiness zone 8.

If you think you are not in the right spot or you want to check your climate zone and hardiness zone for sure, click on the main thread to find out and get additional information Fruit Trees and Berries that Grow Best in Your Area Naturally and it will have a link to your specific climate zone and hardiness zone for you to post!

Familiar places in this area...

Seattle, WA, USA


(source)

This list won't be perfect, as there are so many different factors that affect a fruit tree's growth, but it should be a good help by seeing which trees do well for others in a similar area who have had success with a particular variety. By growing trees that are already slightly adapted to your area, saving the seeds, and growing new fruit trees, you could help create many more new varieties that are very adapted to your specific area!

Hardiness zones are one important factor and show the average annual minimum temperature for a location. You can click on https://garden.org/nga/zipzone/index.php?zip=27822&q=find_zone&submit=Go+%3E to find your exact hardiness zone, and there are also links to lots of other good information.


(source)

Fruit tree nurseries usually list hardiness zones for their fruit trees, but I've often found they tend to exaggerate the growing zones and are often unreliable.

They often leave out one very important aspect... climate zones.

What is a climate zone you may ask?

A climate zone takes other important things into consideration, such as humidity and rainfall. There are many different subsets and climate zones, but I believe this website does a great job of simplifying it into a few main climate zones...

A) Tropical- hot and humid, average temperatures are greater than 64°F (18°C) year-round and there is more than 59 inches of precipitation each year

B) Dry- dry (not humid) and little precipitation

C) Temperate- warm and humid summers with thunderstorms and mild winters

D) Continental- warm to cool summers and very cold winters. In the winter, this zone can experience snowstorms, strong winds, and very cold temperatures—sometimes falling below -22°F (-30°C)!



If you live in the US, you should be able to tell your general climate zone based on the map below and the descriptions above of what it should be like there.

I couldn't find a great general map for Canada and other countries, but you should be able to generally tell from the descriptions above. If you want to find out your exact climate zone, you can check out a cool map here World Climate Zones to find your zone with links at the bottom of the page based on the color, that you can click on with detailed information of your climate zone.


(source)

This should be a huge help to others with that same climate and hardiness zone to help them decide what to plant!

If you could post your general location in your state or country with your reply, that would be an awesome help!

The trees should be able to grow well naturally without extensive disease or pest control.
COMMENTS:
 
pollinator
Posts: 328
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama)
30
fish fungi foraging bee building medical herbs
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am in Zone 7b in North Alabama. I find Asian Pears, Asian Persimmons, Jujube and Pawpaw grow well here.  Raspberries and Blackberries too.  
 
master steward
Posts: 2589
Location: USDA Zone 8a
638
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am Zone 8b, very dry, usually in a drought.  Texas Hill Country

I have Agarita, (Mahonia trifoliolata) and Prickly Pear Cactus.

I don't have any native fruit trees.

For future reference:    

 Mr. Smarty Plants wishes you many fruitful years to come!

Rubus trivialis (southern dewberry)

Prunus rivularis (creek plum)

Prunus mexicana (Mexican plum)

Diospyros texana (Texas persimmon)

Diospyros virginiana (common persimmon)

Fragaria virginiana (Virginia strawberry)

Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry)



https://www.wildflower.org/expert/show.php?id=3650

Also Capsicum annuum (Chile pequin)  might grow here if I tried it.

I have a thornless blackberry that turns into bird food since the berries dry up before they get ripe enough for me to eat.  It has handled the drought without water.

We planted a pear that got cedar rust, then we replace it with a Methly Plum that just didn't do anything but struggle.
 
pollinator
Posts: 418
Location: Upstate SC
35
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm in upstate South Carolina, Koppen zone humid subtropical, USDA cold zone 8a, AHS heat zone 8.  

Peaches and plums grow well and self seed readily. Limiting factors are susceptibility to late frosts and pest/diseases such as plum curculio and brown rot. A wild plum is native.  Persimmons (American and Asian) grow well with no limiting factors.  American persimmon is native and common.  Pears (European and Asian) grow well, but fire blight is present, so use fire blight resistant cultivars. Apples grow well, but our summer heat, drought, and diseases limit fruit quality, they are small and tart.  Sweet and sour cherry trees do not grow well in our heat, even though a wild relative, the black cherry (Prunus serotina) is native.  Apricots, pluots, and other stone fruits will grow, but are highly susceptible to late frosts, so you will rarely get a crop.  Jujube grows well, but set fruit poorly most years (don't have the right pollinators present?). Figs grow and fruit well, although an occasional cold winter will kill them back to their roots. Trifoliate hybrid citrus (citrange, citrumelo) grow well and are only susceptible to late frosts.
Mulberries grow well and red mulberry is native.

Grapes (muscadine and northern) grow well with no limiting factors on muscadine.  Northern grapes are susceptible to Pierce's disease which will kill them after a number of years of good yields.  Muscadine self seeds and is native.  Fuzzy kiwi will grow, but will be top killed by an occasional cold winter.  Arguta kiwis will grow, but are limited by our summer heat and drought. Both kiwis are susceptible to late frosts.  Bramble fruit will grow, but our heat and drought stress the plants and limit fruit quality.  Blackberries do better than raspberries. There are native brambles, but have small and tart fruit.  June bearing strawberries grow and fruit well, our summer heat limits everbearer fruit production. Strawberries will self seed. Blueberries grow and fruit well, are pest free, and are native.  

That Plant maps site has AHS heat maps for each state, but doesn't list them on their home page.  Google "AHS heat map" and your state name to find them on their site.
 
pollinator
Posts: 240
Location: Tasmania
129
goat wood heat homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think I'm in zone 8b or 9a, temperate climate. Inland Tasmania.

Growing wild around the place I have seen:
Apples
Elderberries
European plums
Hawthorn
Blackthorn
Blackberries
Some pears

There are a lot of old hawthorn hedges around. I remember reading something a while ago about grafting certain fruit trees onto hawthorn, so that might be a way to use the root system of something already thriving, while producing tastier fruit.

Blueberries are often commercially grown here without chemicals.

This map might be a good one to use to find trees in the wild and observe what is growing well: https://fallingfruit.org/
 
garden master
Posts: 790
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
207
hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Dennis Bangham wrote:I find Asian Pears, Asian Persimmons, Jujube and Pawpaw grow well here.  Raspberries and Blackberries too.  



Awesome, I've heard most of those are pretty pest resistant too!
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 790
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
207
hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Anne Miller wrote:I am Zone 8b, very dry, usually in a drought.  Texas Hill Country

I have Agarita, (Mahonia trifoliolata) and Prickly Pear Cactus.

I don't have any native fruit trees.

For future reference:    

 Mr. Smarty Plants wishes you many fruitful years to come!

Rubus trivialis (southern dewberry)

Prunus rivularis (creek plum)

Prunus mexicana (Mexican plum)

Diospyros texana (Texas persimmon)

Diospyros virginiana (common persimmon)

Fragaria virginiana (Virginia strawberry)

Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry)



https://www.wildflower.org/expert/show.php?id=3650

Also Capsicum annuum (Chile pequin)  might grow here if I tried it.

I have a thornless blackberry that turns into bird food since the berries dry up before they get ripe enough for me to eat.  It has handled the drought without water.

We planted a pear that got cedar rust, then we replace it with a Methly Plum that just didn't do anything but struggle.



Interesting varieties!

Do you think your climate is more of the Dry or Temperate climate?
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 790
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
207
hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Turner wrote:I'm in upstate South Carolina, Koppen zone humid subtropical, USDA cold zone 8a, AHS heat zone 8.  

Peaches and plums grow well and self seed readily. Limiting factors are susceptibility to late frosts and pest/diseases such as plum curculio and brown rot.



Awesome info and list Mike!

I've noticed the same things. My trees have done better with the late frosts and brown rot as they've gotten older, but that plum circulio has been tougher for me, going to try to look into more ways to counter it this year.

A wild plum is native.  Persimmons (American and Asian) grow well with no limiting factors.  American persimmon is native and common.  Pears (European and Asian) grow well, but fire blight is present, so use fire blight resistant cultivars. Apples grow well, but our summer heat, drought, and diseases limit fruit quality, they are small and tart.  Sweet and sour cherry trees do not grow well in our heat, even though a wild relative, the black cherry (Prunus serotina) is native.  Apricots, pluots, and other stone fruits will grow, but are highly susceptible to late frosts, so you will rarely get a crop.  Jujube grows well, but set fruit poorly most years (don't have the right pollinators present?). Figs grow and fruit well, although an occasional cold winter will kill them back to their roots. Trifoliate hybrid citrus (citrange, citrumelo) grow well and are only susceptible to late frosts.



I've gotten some apple and sweet cherry varieties to grow pretty well here once they get past that first year, hoping to get my first harvest this year!

Grapes (muscadine and northern) grow well with no limiting factors on muscadine.  Northern grapes are susceptible to Pierce's disease which will kill them after a number of years of good yields.  Muscadine self seeds and is native.  Fuzzy kiwi will grow, but will be top killed by an occasional cold winter.  Arguta kiwis will grow, but are limited by our summer heat and drought. Both kiwis are susceptible to late frosts.  Bramble fruit will grow, but our heat and drought stress the plants and limit fruit quality.  Blackberries do better than raspberries. There are native brambles, but have small and tart fruit.  June bearing strawberries grow and fruit well, our summer heat limits everbearer fruit production. Strawberries will self seed. Blueberries grow and fruit well, are pest free, and are native.  

That Plant maps site has AHS heat maps for each state, but doesn't list them on their home page.  Google "AHS heat map" and your state name to find them on their site.



The heat maps were neat, it brings in another important factor!
 
Posts: 1
1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm in 8b in Charleston, South Carolina. It's HOT and humid during the growing season.

My friend close by grows Satsuma oranges.
I successfully grow Meyer Lemon, grapefruit, Pom 'Wonderful', and Persimmon 'Fuyu'. The citrus didn't produce this winter, as last winter we had a VERY uncharacteristic week-long freeze with snow on the ground! Young plants may need covering in even short periods of.freezing weather, but when they get more mature, they seem to do well.

 
Mike Turner
pollinator
Posts: 418
Location: Upstate SC
35
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Steve Thorn,
Apple trees grow fine and bloom here, but the summer heat and drought results in them producing small, tart fruit that is suitable for pies, but not that good for fresh eating. Assuming you can beat the squirrels to them.
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 790
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
207
hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Bonnie Cleaveland wrote:I'm in 8b in Charleston, South Carolina. It's HOT and humid during the growing season.



I bet it is, I feel that way here and it's even hotter where you are. I've gotten to where I have to get most of my work done in the early morning now!

My friend close by grows Satsuma oranges.
I successfully grow Meyer Lemon, grapefruit, Pom 'Wonderful', and Persimmon 'Fuyu'. The citrus didn't produce this winter, as last winter we had a VERY uncharacteristic week-long freeze with snow on the ground! Young plants may need covering in even short periods of.freezing weather, but when they get more mature, they seem to do well.



I'm right on the 7b/8a line, and I've been really tempted to try Meyer lemons because I love them, but I know they probably wouldn't survive our freezes! Still might give them a try!
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 790
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
207
hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Turner wrote:Steve Thorn,
Apple trees grow fine and bloom here, but the summer heat and drought results in them producing small, tart fruit that is suitable for pies, but not that good for fresh eating. Assuming you can beat the squirrels to them.



Yeah, who new squirrels were such good apple thiefs!

One year I had a tree full of apples, and on the way out of the driveway I saw one feasting in the top of the tree. When I looked at it later, not a single one was left!

What types of apple varieties did you try?
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 790
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
207
hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Kate Downham wrote:I think I'm in zone 8b or 9a, temperate climate. Inland Tasmania.

Growing wild around the place I have seen:
Apples
Elderberries
European plums
Hawthorn
Blackthorn
Blackberries
Some pears

There are a lot of old hawthorn hedges around. I remember reading something a while ago about grafting certain fruit trees onto hawthorn, so that might be a way to use the root system of something already thriving, while producing tastier fruit.



That's awesome all of that grows wild! The only thing I've found here are blackberries and a few pears!

Blueberries are often commercially grown here without chemicals.



I love bueberries, they are usually very easy to grow here too!
 
Mike Turner
pollinator
Posts: 418
Location: Upstate SC
35
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Steve Thorn wrote:

Mike Turner wrote:Steve Thorn,
Apple trees grow fine and bloom here, but the summer heat and drought results in them producing small, tart fruit that is suitable for pies, but not that good for fresh eating. Assuming you can beat the squirrels to them.



Yeah, who new squirrels were such good apple thiefs!

One year I had a tree full of apples, and on the way out of the driveway I saw one feasting in the top of the tree. When I looked at it later, not a single one was left!

What types of apple varieties did you try?



Liberty, honeycrisp, dolgo, ecos red
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 790
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
207
hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Turner wrote:Liberty, honeycrisp, dolgo, ecos red



I have honeycrisp growing too, it's doing ok.

I have a Fuji that is doing really good, and I've heard it does good with long hot summers, so I'm hoping it will produce some good fruit this year! I've looked into the old southern apple varieties that appear to do pretty good in our area, although it might be a little warmer where you are!
 
Posts: 21
Location: Extreme Southern Central Georgia, U.S. Zone 8b
7
forest garden foraging trees
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Extreme southern Georgia, zone 8b. HOT, humid, and long summers, with tons of rainfall, and a bit swampy.
I have found blackberries growing prolifically in the wild, as well as winged sumac, wild grapes and maucadines, red Chokeberry, and a few blueberry patches even, seeming all to do well. Pecans grow all over the place too, and I’ve seen several lemon trees around here producing very well. On my property we have planted lots of mayhaws and elderberry, which love it here, including the western blue elderberry. I’ve also got a few American persimmon trees and some red mulberry trees doing really well
 
Steve Thorn
garden master
Posts: 790
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
207
hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Gabe Gordon wrote:Extreme southern Georgia, zone 8b. HOT, humid, and long summers, with tons of rainfall, and a bit swampy.
I have found blackberries growing prolifically in the wild, as well as winged sumac, wild grapes and maucadines, red Chokeberry, and a few blueberry patches even, seeming all to do well. Pecans grow all over the place too, and I’ve seen several lemon trees around here producing very well. On my property we have planted lots of mayhaws and elderberry, which love it here, including the western blue elderberry. I’ve also got a few American persimmon trees and some red mulberry trees doing really well



Very neat Gabe!
 
Posts: 48
Location: Fort Worth, TX 76179
14
hugelkultur purity forest garden
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Zone 8a, Fort Worth Texas.

I am testing several types of trees but the best producers to date are Figs, peaches, mulberries, and nectarines.
My friend lives in a house that used to be where an old pecan orchard used to be.

Test varieties that I am also hoping will produce are:
  • cherry (Minnie Lee & Royal Lee)
  • plum
  • apple (supposed to be cotton root rot issues that hinder long-term success)
  • pear
  • almond
  • olive
  • pomegranate


  • NON-Adapted BUT put into a microclimate against a Southern brick wall and draped with C9 Xmas lights and the occasional clear plastic tarp in winter months
  • Mexican Lime
  • Meyers Lemon
  • blood orange
  • Miho satsuma
  • kumquat
  • arctic frost
  • Frost orange
  •  
    Steve Thorn
    garden master
    Posts: 790
    Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
    207
    hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator

    Sara Rosenberg wrote:Zone 8a, Fort Worth Texas.

    I am testing several types of trees but the best producers to date are Figs, peaches, mulberries, and nectarines.
    My friend lives in a house that used to be where an old pecan orchard used to be.

    Test varieties that I am also hoping will produce are:

  • cherry (Minnie Lee & Royal Lee)
  • plum
  • apple (supposed to be cotton root rot issues that hinder long-term success)
  • pear
  • almond
  • olive
  • pomegranate


  • Neat list Sara!

    NON-Adapted BUT put into a microclimate against a Southern brick wall and draped with C9 Xmas lights and the occasional clear plastic tarp in winter months

  • Mexican Lime
  • Meyers Lemon
  • blood orange
  • Miho satsuma
  • kumquat
  • arctic frost
  • Frost orange


  • I've been really interested to try some of these in my area too!

    The ones I've been looking at are satsuma, kumquat, and Meyer's lemon. I'm right on the 7b/8a border, so I don't know if they'll work for me, but should be interesting to try!

    Great information!
     
    Posts: 3
    Location: west cenrtal Louisiana on the 8b/9a line fine sandy loam soil pH 5.7
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    The only citrus I would consider planting outside on the 7b / 8a line would be Arctic Frost (Satsuma hybrid), Orange Frost (Satsuma Hybrid) and Miho Satsuma (in that order, which is also worst to best tasting), even then expect to need active freeze protection when temperatures drop below about 18 degrees F.      Active freeze protection includes covering tree and using heat lamps /  incandescent Christmas lights  to maintain safe temperatures.    Kumquat trees may survive in your climate, but will likely fruit too late in the season (Feb / March) for you to get any fruit unless you actively freeze protect maintaining temperatures around the tree over 25F.      Miho is an early fruiting Satsuma, typically early October about 3 weeks ahead of Owari, I am not sure about the "frost" hybrids.
     
    Sara Rosenberg
    Posts: 48
    Location: Fort Worth, TX 76179
    14
    hugelkultur purity forest garden
    • Likes 2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I actively protect my existing trees in winter but really love the spring blooms so regardless of fruit, I want the trees.
     
    Sara Rosenberg
    Posts: 48
    Location: Fort Worth, TX 76179
    14
    hugelkultur purity forest garden
    • Likes 3
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    My citrus wall today.
    IMG_20190322_080554294.jpg
    [Thumbnail for IMG_20190322_080554294.jpg]
    Citrus wall
     
    gardener
    Posts: 5948
    Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
    889
    hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken pig homestead
    • Likes 3
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Many of the citrus family I want to grow don't grow here without winter protection and since I haven't gotten around to building the conservatory yet, those are what we don't grow, yet.

    We do have, Apples; Ark. Black, Johnson, Fuji,  Figs; Brown Turkey and Celeste,  Pears; Asian and Bosc,  Plums; Damson and Elephant Heart,  Elberta Peach,  Black Mulberry.
    Planting this year will be Cherry; Stella and Emperor Frances, hazelnut and chestnut.
    We also grow Wine and table grapes, muscadine, Persimmon, Pecan and Hickory nuts, Slippery Elm.
     
    Steve Thorn
    garden master
    Posts: 790
    Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
    207
    hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator

    Sara Rosenberg wrote:My citrus wall today.



    Great looking citrus wall Sara!

    I'd like to set up one of these soon!
     
    Steve Thorn
    garden master
    Posts: 790
    Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
    207
    hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator

    Bryant RedHawk wrote:Many of the citrus family I want to grow don't grow here without winter protection and since I haven't gotten around to building the conservatory yet, those are what we don't grow, yet.

    We do have, Apples; Ark. Black, Johnson, Fuji,  Figs; Brown Turkey and Celeste,  Pears; Asian and Bosc,  Plums; Damson and Elephant Heart,  Elberta Peach,  Black Mulberry.
    Planting this year will be Cherry; Stella and Emperor Frances, hazelnut and chestnut.
    We also grow Wine and table grapes, muscadine, Persimmon, Pecan and Hickory nuts, Slippery Elm.



    Great list Bryant!

    Is the Johnson apple also known as a Johnson Keeper or is it a totally different variety? I've been looking into getting a Johnson Keeper apple.

    My Stella cherry tree has grown great for me so far here on the 7b/8a line, and I hope to get my first harvest this year from them!
     
    Bryant RedHawk
    gardener
    Posts: 5948
    Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
    889
    hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken pig homestead
    • Likes 2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Went out and checked the tree and that is my mistake, the trees are jonathans, apparently I had a) fumble fingers typing or b)oldtimers kicked in there.

    I do have a friend that does a U-pick-it orchard that grows the Johnson Keepers (we grow the Arkansas Blacks for over winter storage apples) His Keepers are pretty tasty and crisp most of the winter.

    We chose the Arkansas black because of flavor, and it does make a super apple pie. They are sweeter to me than the Johnson Keepers and we try to use very little sugar in any baking.
     
    Steve Thorn
    garden master
    Posts: 790
    Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
    207
    hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator

    Bryant RedHawk wrote:Went out and checked the tree and that is my mistake, the trees are jonathans, apparently I had a) fumble fingers typing or b)oldtimers kicked in there.

    I do have a friend that does a U-pick-it orchard that grows the Johnson Keepers (we grow the Arkansas Blacks for over winter storage apples) His Keepers are pretty tasty and crisp most of the winter.

    We chose the Arkansas black because of flavor, and it does make a super apple pie. They are sweeter to me than the Johnson Keepers and we try to use very little sugar in any baking.



    Neat!

    I planted an Arkansas Black and Jonathan apple tree this past fall!
     
    Sara Rosenberg
    Posts: 48
    Location: Fort Worth, TX 76179
    14
    hugelkultur purity forest garden
    • Likes 2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I'm having issues with my apples. Granny and golden delicious are hit with borers. Any suggestions? I have two yet to be affected. Any suggestions?
     
    Steve Thorn
    garden master
    Posts: 790
    Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
    207
    hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator

    Sara Rosenberg wrote:I'm having issues with my apples. Granny and golden delicious are hit with borers. Any suggestions? I have two yet to be affected. Any suggestions?



    I've had borers on my peach trees, but haven't had them yet on my apple trees.

    My peach trees were in a wet spot, so I added more soil around them to make it drier, mulched them which helped improve the soil, and I think once the trees were established after a few years, that helped too.
     
    gardener
    Posts: 2377
    Location: Central Texas zone 8a
    378
    cattle chicken bee sheep
    • Likes 4
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    This season i planted only native fruit trees for my central texas homestead. I created a tree belt to keep my sheep and cows off of them. It wasn't intentional but i am glad it happened. It's a limestone slope and it was easier to drill post holes on the flat land after the slope. The top of the slope is my existing perimeter fence.  

    I planted santa rosa plum. Mexican plum. Texas persimmon. I have a list of other trees like soapberry. I was happy to find wild native blackberries (dewberries) already growing on the slope. I think the only reason they grew is the very close proximity to yuccas. The yuccas sharp ends kept browsing pressure to a minimum.

    I mulched the area with woodchips and added branches as obstacles to deer.

    I cant comment on their success yet, but i think the plan is valid.
    20190322_170501-640x480.jpg
    [Thumbnail for 20190322_170501-640x480.jpg]
    20190322_171425-640x480.jpg
    [Thumbnail for 20190322_171425-640x480.jpg]
    20190323_183956-480x640.jpg
    [Thumbnail for 20190323_183956-480x640.jpg]
     
    Steve Thorn
    garden master
    Posts: 790
    Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
    207
    hugelkultur forest garden fish trees food preservation cooking bee homestead
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator

    wayne fajkus wrote:This season i planted only native fruit trees for my central texas homestead. I created a tree belt to keep my sheep and cows off of them. It wasn't intentional but i am glad it happened. It's a limestone slope and it was easier to drill post holes on the flat land after the slope. The top of the slope is my existing perimeter fence.  

    I planted santa rosa plum. Mexican plum. Texas persimmon. I have a list of other trees like soapberry. I was happy to find wild native blackberries (dewberries) already growing on the slope. I think the only reason they grew is the very close proximity to yuccas. The yuccas sharp ends kept browsing pressure to a minimum.

    I mulched the area with woodchips and added branches as obstacles to deer.

    I cant comment on their success yet, but i think the plan is valid.



    Looks awesome Wayne!
     
    Gabe Gordon
    Posts: 21
    Location: Extreme Southern Central Georgia, U.S. Zone 8b
    7
    forest garden foraging trees
    • Likes 3
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator

    Gabe Gordon wrote:Extreme southern Georgia, zone 8b. HOT, humid, and long summers, with tons of rainfall, and a bit swampy.
    I have found blackberries growing prolifically in the wild, as well as winged sumac, wild grapes and maucadines, red Chokeberry, and a few blueberry patches even, seeming all to do well. Pecans grow all over the place too, and I’ve seen several lemon trees around here producing very well. On my property we have planted lots of mayhaws and elderberry, which love it here, including the western blue elderberry. I’ve also got a few American persimmon trees and some red mulberry trees doing really well



       To update my own list here, more than just a few blueberry patches are growing! They grow like weeds here, I cant walk 10 feet without finding a small bush. Although this year some late winter warm spells had most of them blooming too early and a poorly timed frost got most of them, and the birds got the rest. But the handful of berries I did harvest were the sweetest blueberries I have ever eaten. Also growing wild and prolifically I have found blue HUCKLEberries(see pictures), more tart than the blueberries, but still sweet and delicious, also apparently more resistant to early blooming and birds because they're all still loaded with berries, even after my daily harvests.
       Asian persimmons also grow well, white mulberries, even have a black mulberry doing well even though I heard they don't like the humidity- mine seems to be happy. I have some "cold hardy" edible bananas that I am excited about, grow and produce fruit in 9 months, frost kills them to the ground, spring warmth sprouts them again and they repeat the process. I'm also going to test grow some Date Palms, because ive seen them grow downtown here and even produce some good fruits despite the humidity, as well as Texas Persimmons to see if they'll do well in the humidity (if anyone has experience with these or knows anything else about them, I appreciate all info!) and then some date plums because I like all these cool persimmon relatives, so ill update on those eventually.
    IMG_9429.JPG
    [Thumbnail for IMG_9429.JPG]
    IMG_2565.JPG
    [Thumbnail for IMG_2565.JPG]
    IMG_2566.JPG
    [Thumbnail for IMG_2566.JPG]
     
    I have gone to look for myself. If I should return before I get back, keep me here with this tiny ad:
    Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
    https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
    • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
    • New Topic
    Boost this thread!