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Please link to the separate thread for your particular climate and hardiness zone at the bottom of this post to list your plants so we can get the best information in one easy to see spot so I can update it!

If you don't see a link yet for your climate and hardiness zone, it should be coming soon!

Only general discussion should be listed in this thread.


I think if we get a lot of input from everyone here, this could be a super valuable resource for figuring out which fruit trees and berries will grow best in your area.

This list won't be perfect, as there are so many different factors that affect a fruit tree's growth, but it should be a good help by seeing which trees do well for others in a similar area who have had success with a particular variety. By growing trees that are already slightly adapted to your area, saving the seeds, and growing new fruit trees, you could help create many more new varieties that are very adapted to your specific area!

Hardiness zones are one important factor and show the average annual minimum temperature for a location. You can click on https://garden.org/nga/zipzone/index.php?zip=27822&q=find_zone&submit=Go+%3E to find your exact hardiness zone, and there are also links to lots of other good information.


(source)

Fruit tree nurseries usually list hardiness zones for their fruit trees, but I've often found they tend to exaggerate the growing zones and are often unreliable.

They often leave out one very important aspect... climate zones.

What is a climate zone you may ask?

A climate zone takes other important things into consideration, such as humidity and rainfall. There are many different subsets and climate zones, but I believe this website does a great job of simplifying it into a few main climate zones...

A) Tropical- hot and humid, average temperatures are greater than 64°F (18°C) year-round and there is more than 59 inches of precipitation each year

B) Dry- dry (not humid) and little precipitation

C) Temperate- warm and humid summers with thunderstorms and mild winters

D) Continental- warm to cool summers and very cold winters. In the winter, this zone can experience snowstorms, strong winds, and very cold temperatures—sometimes falling below -22°F (-30°C)!



If you live in the US, you should be able to tell your general climate zone based on the map below and the descriptions above of what it should be like there.

I couldn't find a great general map for Canada and other countries, but you should be able to generally tell from the descriptions above. If you want to find out your exact climate zone, you can check out a cool map here World Climate Zones to find your zone with links at the bottom of the page based on the color, that you can click on with detailed information of your climate zone.


(source)

Based on these two main factors, the links below will link to a separate thread that you can click on based on your climate and hardiness zones to list fruit trees and berry bushes that have been successful for you in your specific zones.

This should be a huge help to others with that same climate and hardiness zone to help them decide what to plant!

I think this should cover most of the growing areas, let me know if yours is not here and I will add it!

If you could list your general location in your state or country with your reply, that would be an awesome help!

The fruit trees and berries should be able to grow well naturally without extensive disease or pest control.


Link to your climate and hardiness zone below!


Tropical Climate Hardiness Zone 10
Tropical Climate Hardiness Zone 11
Tropical Climate Hardiness Zone 12
Tropical Climate Hardiness Zone 13

Oceanic/Mediterranean Climate Hardiness Zone 6
Oceanic/Mediterranean Climate Hardiness Zone 7
Oceanic/Mediterranean Climate Hardiness Zone 8
Oceanic/Mediterranean Climate Hardiness Zone 9
Oceanic/Mediterranean Climate Hardiness Zone 10

Dry Climate Hardiness Zone 3
Dry Climate Hardiness Zone 4
Dry Climate Hardiness Zone 5
Dry Climate Hardiness Zone 6
Dry Climate Hardiness Zone 7
Dry Climate Hardiness Zone 8
Dry Climate Hardiness Zone 9
Dry Climate Hardiness Zone 10

Temperate Climate Hardiness Zone 6
Temperate Climate Hardiness Zone 7
Temperate Climate Hardiness Zone 8
Temperate Climate Hardiness Zone 9
Temperate Climate Hardiness Zone 10

Continental Climate Hardiness Zone 3
Continental Climate Hardiness Zone 4
Continental Climate Hardiness Zone 5

Please list your plants under the links above to the separate thread for your particular climate and hardiness zone so we can get the best information in one easy to see spot so I can update it!

If you don't see a link yet for your climate and hardiness zone, it should be coming soon!

Only general discussion should be listed in this thread.
COMMENTS:
 
pollinator
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It would be great if people would talk about their thoughts on how climate change will affect what is easy to grow. For example, here the summertime droughts are a big challenge and we're able to successfully ripen things we previously didn't have enough heat for. A big challenge for me when selecting what to plant has been that just because something has always been easy to grow here doesn't mean it will thrive any longer
 
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I think the easiest way to figure out what grows in your area is to look at what's native and invasive in your area. Black-cap raspberries are prolific here and they're quite yummy so I'm learning how to properly prune them for best production; we have several canes that have volunteered on our property and they're supposed to be easy to propagate if we ever decide to better organize the garden.

I live in a temperate rainforest that has cool, wet winters and very dry, hot summers so I'm not really sure where I would fall under your climate classification. My area has been described as mediterranean/sub-mediterranean because the climate patterns are similar, but we are colder and probably wetter. Typical temperature is about 5C in winter and 25C in summer but -5C - 32C isn't untypical. We rain almost all year round except during the summers, where we have several weeks of almost consistent drought.

Other fruit I've grown or seen grown successfully in my area: cherries, plums, peaches, blueberries, strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, salmonberries, thimbleberries. Thimbleberries are my favourite but you'll never see them in stores because they're impossible to transport. If you can get a plant and it's growable in your area, I definitely recommend it. :D
 
Meg Mitchell
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James Landreth wrote:It would be great if people would talk about their thoughts on how climate change will affect what is easy to grow. For example, here the summertime droughts are a big challenge and we're able to successfully ripen things we previously didn't have enough heat for. A big challenge for me when selecting what to plant has been that just because something has always been easy to grow here doesn't mean it will thrive any longer



Absolutely. Some of my favourite fruits are stone fruits and I'm very worried about how climate change is affecting their ability to flourish and ripen. If you have a cherry or plum tree (or even an apple tree) and all your blossoms come in during an early warm period, and then a colder period comes, oftentimes the blossoms will freeze and drop off and that's basically the end of your growing season for those fruits. Commercial growers don't seem to have much of a solution for this problem and it's probably only going to get worse as time goes on. Knowing which fruit are resistant to which kinds of weather would be a huge plus. I used to have a neighbor whose plum tree would bear pounds of plums with no effort but that's not the case any more.

In my area, people have been growing olives, citrus and other warm-weather fruits, with the help of carefully set-up microclimates and sometimes fluorescent lighting around the trees for light and heat. I think Meyer lemons and olives can be grown here (Victoria GVR) without too much assistance but the assistance does help, at least for now.
 
gardener
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Try https://www.plantmaps.com/index.php
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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According to the maps I mentioned in my last post we are zone 9a and we can't move for cherries here. It is like walking on ball bearings in many places!
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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We are in a major wine growing area so I should add grapes. Also kiwi grows very well here.
 
James Landreth
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I'm not far from you, Meg. Here people (including me) are also growing hardy citrus, olives, pomegranate, and even guava, passion fruit, and loquat!

I suppose it matters also how the fruit trees and bushes will be managed. For example, I'd like to select for very drought tolerant plants that could survive without irrigation if necessary. We're entering unknown territory in that regard, at least around here.
 
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Amanda Launchbury-Rainey wrote:According to the maps I mentioned in my last post we are zone 9a and we can't move for cherries here. It is like walking on ball bearings in many places!


Amanda, I'm in 9b.I've never heard of anyone growing cherries here! What variety do you have?
 
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James Landreth wrote:I suppose it matters also how the fruit trees and bushes will be managed. For example, I'd like to select for very drought tolerant plants that could survive without irrigation if necessary. We're entering unknown territory in that regard, at least around here.



Many plants will thrive with very little water if they're trained for it from the beginning. This is one reason I'm growing my fruit trees from seed. Grapes do very well without irrigation.
 
James Landreth
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That's good to know Lauren. What other plants have you found that survive without irrigation after establishment? Do you grow any nut trees there?
 
garden master
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I'm going to add an Oceanic/Mediterranean climate zone with hardiness zones that should give better information for people in these similar climates for the Pacific Northwest, much of Europe, New Zealand, southern Australia, and other places with these climates.

Please list your plants under the links above at the bottom of the 1st main post to the separate thread for your particular climate and hardiness zone so we can get the best information in one easy to see spot so I can update it!

If it doesn't have a link yet, it should be coming soon!

Only general discussion should be listed in this thread.


This is such great information coming in, excited to see all of the great info!
 
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I have been disappointed at times that the correlation between Climate or Hardiness Zone maps and what actually produces well doesn't seem to exist. If we permies are going to work on what sounds like an excellent resource, I'd like to suggest that we need to know things like "minimum temp X number of days for fruit to ripen". I'm on the Pacific Wet Coast, a little colder than what Meg Mitchell is describing, but despite having a plenty long enough "frost free" period to grow tomatoes, it's a struggle to get them to ripen and if we get the wrong weather at the beginning of Sept, we can easily loose the entire crop. If anything, the info on "how hot is too hot" seems more available.

Similarly, many people don't realize that some fruit needs a minimum "cold period" in order to set fruit (such as apple), so moving that plant to a warmer location may not work.

Maybe I'm the only person who took way too long to figure out these two factors, but I have difficulty believing that. The info just doesn't seem to show up on many plant descriptions. Getting help from Permies who are actually growing these things, seems like a fine idea!

Is the plan to eventually make some sort of a chart under each of these headings? That would be awesome!

I'd also remind people that sometimes knowing what people try and it just didn't work out (Gooseberries *should* grow fine here, but I've had no luck with even getting the plants to look happy, let alone get fruit set) is also useful info. It doesn't mean that someone else might not have better success, but it would warn them to do a little extra research on what might make that particular species happy.

Lauren Ritz wrote:

Many plants will thrive with very little water if they're trained for it from the beginning.

Although I agree early training and a good tap root are huge assets, I moved onto a property with well-watered apple/plum trees and I weaned them off gradually by watering deeply with longer gaps until at this point they get some occasional grey water if the drought is particularly bad. I also gradually added extra mulch and simple polyculture around some of them, although I'd like to do more of that. That said, I lost several plants two summers ago that I thought had been weaned well enough. That just tells me it was time to plant something else in that location!
 
pollinator
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James Landreth wrote:It would be great if people would talk about their thoughts on how climate change will affect what is easy to grow. For example, here the summertime droughts are a big challenge and we're able to successfully ripen things we previously didn't have enough heat for. A big challenge for me when selecting what to plant has been that just because something has always been easy to grow here doesn't mean it will thrive any longer



Yes. Rhubarb is a cold weather perennial, and a pretty tough plant at that. But if it gets too warm, they bolt early, diminishing the number of good stalks you can get.
As a pollinator, climate change can also affect the pollen that insects rely on that pollinate our crops: too much CO2 and the pollen is high in sugars but low in protein and our bees can't gather enough pollen to thrive. Seasons change fast but species need time to adapt: If a helpful insect cannot get what it needs at the time that it needs it because of a change, the insect will fail to thrive and the crops it pollinates will suffer.
There are some years when we don't see a specific bird [red winged black bird for example] because it could not mate successfully. Several years of this and the species can be in trouble. The climate is relatively similar from year to year but if the trend continues, a species can disappear. I started getting some small hive beetles in my hives. Not many, not often, but they are supposed to DIE in the winter here [4b]. As the planet warms, we should expect more tropical diseases to ramp north, and because our plants, animals and even ourselves are not adapted yet, there will be trouble.
The species do not evolve as fast at the climate.
 
Steve Thorn
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Jay Angler wrote:I have been disappointed at times that the correlation between Climate or Hardiness Zone maps and what actually produces well doesn't seem to exist.



Me too, I'm thinking that this will be awesome information to help provide a better resource!

If we permies are going to work on what sounds like an excellent resource, I'd like to suggest that we need to know things like "minimum temp X number of days for fruit to ripen". I'm on the Pacific Wet Coast, a little colder than what Meg Mitchell is describing, but despite having a plenty long enough "frost free" period to grow tomatoes, it's a struggle to get them to ripen and if we get the wrong weather at the beginning of Sept, we can easily loose the entire crop. If anything, the info on "how hot is too hot" seems more available. Similarly, many people don't realize that some fruit needs a minimum "cold period" in order to set fruit (such as apple), so moving that plant to a warmer location may not work. Maybe I'm the only person who took way too long to figure out these two factors, but I have difficulty believing that. The info just doesn't seem to show up on many plant descriptions. Getting help from Permies who are actually growing these things, seems like a fine idea!



I think that by having the separate threads, with the links above, for each general climate and hardiness zone, it should connect people in very similar areas who's climates should be close enough for it to be grown like others have in that same climate and hardiness zone. It won't be perfect, but it should be very close!

If people list things like extremely early or late bloom times or very long harvest times, I think that would be awesome and super helpful information!

Is the plan to eventually make some sort of a chart under each of these headings? That would be awesome!



Yes, the links above to the separate threads for each unique climate and hardiness zone will have a chart listing the plants that have been most successfully grown in that area with specific varieties also listed based on the number of comments for each type!

I'd also remind people that sometimes knowing what people try and it just didn't work out (Gooseberries *should* grow fine here, but I've had no luck with even getting the plants to look happy, let alone get fruit set) is also useful info. It doesn't mean that someone else might not have better success, but it would warn them to do a little extra research on what might make that particular species happy.



I agree that this is super valuable information! I looked up multiple resources from different nurseries that said Gala apples would do well in my area and hardiness zone. Maybe that was with spraying, but with our humid climate and growing it naturally, it just couldn't fight off powdery mildew. I planted another one just in case it was a one time fluke or unhealthy plant, but the second one died from the powdery mildew too.

Although I agree early training and a good tap root are huge assets, I moved onto a property with well-watered apple/plum trees and I weaned them off gradually by watering deeply with longer gaps until at this point they get some occasional grey water if the drought is particularly bad. I also gradually added extra mulch and simple polyculture around some of them, although I'd like to do more of that. That said, I lost several plants two summers ago that I thought had been weaned well enough. That just tells me it was time to plant something else in that location!



That's awesome!

Yeah all of my fruit trees have been transplanted onto my property when they were fairly young, and they have not been irrigated and have done great with leaf mulch and growing in a polyculture, which are sometimes just "weeds"!

I'm excited to grow seeds from these varieties to create even better adapted plants to my specific area!
 
Steve Thorn
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Amanda Launchbury-Rainey wrote:Try https://www.plantmaps.com/index.php



Awesome maps Amanda!
 
Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
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Leslie Russell wrote:

Amanda Launchbury-Rainey wrote:According to the maps I mentioned in my last post we are zone 9a and we can't move for cherries here. It is like walking on ball bearings in many places!


Amanda, I'm in 9b.I've never heard of anyone growing cherries here! What variety do you have?



There are so many bird cherries - wild ones that grow on roadsides and on the edges of fields, then many gardens have red, black and yellow varieties. Im not joking - they are everywhere! I grow Morello and Stella on the finca and of all the fruit trees I planted 3 years ago, the cherries are the only ones kicking in in our dreadful soil.
 
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Hej! What a useful idea this is! But, I'm having trouble figuring out where to input my information. I live in an area that is climate zone Dfc (boreal), but the continental links are called continental -4, -3, etc. What do those numbers correspond to?  Thanks!
 
Steve Thorn
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Daniel Schneider wrote:Hej! What a useful idea this is! But, I'm having trouble figuring out where to input my information. I live in an area that is climate zone Dfc (boreal), but the continental links are called continental -4, -3, etc. What do those numbers correspond to?  Thanks!



They are the hardiness zones!

If you are in zone 5, a link to the thread should be available now above at the bottom of the main post. If you are in zones 3 or 4, it should be coming soon!
 
Jay Angler
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@ Steve Thorn: you've only put Oceanic/Mediterranean as low as 8, but Vancouver Island tends to have pockets of 6 and 7, and I suspect Washington and Oregon would also. I just read this interesting explanation: "The Koppen classification system, developed by Russian German climatologist Wladimir Koppen in the late 19th century,  is one of the most widely used climate classification systems in the world.  Under the Koppen system, the world’s climates are classified into five main groups: A – Tropical, B – Dry, C – Temperate, D – Continental, and E – Polar.  Victoria falls in the the Temperate group, which is further classified based on the annual precipitation pattern, indicated by the second letter in the classification: s for dry summer, w for dry winter, and f for precipitation throughout the year.   So Cf would include Oceanic climates, like London, England, while Cs climates are termed Mediterranean.  To meet the criteria for a Cs climate, summer months must have less than one third the precipitation as the wettest winter month, and summer months must have less than 30 mm of precipitation.  Victoria easily meets these criteria, with July rainfall of just 13 mm – less than one tenth of our wettest month in December.  Mediterranean climates are further classified as Csa or Csb, depending on whether summers are hot (mean monthly temperature above 22 C) or warm (mean monthly temperature below 22 C).  Based on all these criteria, Victoria’s climate is classed as Csb, or warm summer Mediterranean.  Other locations with a Csb climate include San Francisco, Cape Town, and Porto, Portugal. "  from: http://victoriaweatherandclimate.blogspot.com/2016/01/a-mediterranean-climate.html

Wow - there's more to this climate thing when you start to dig, and weather weirding is only making it more interesting!

This suggests we could fit under Temperate, but since you had an area for Mediterranean, I wondered if that would be more appropriate?
 
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One thing tricky about this for the continental climate section is how much snow cover an area receives.  We receive so much snow locally that it provides insulation for roots and we can keep trees and shrubs that have no business surviving in our zone.  Would the idea be to still list in our technical zone based on temperature scale with the caveat that we have this insulation boon?
 
Cécile Stelzer Johnson
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M. Crex wrote:One thing tricky about this for the continental climate section is how much snow cover an area receives.  We receive so much snow locally that it provides insulation for roots and we can keep trees and shrubs that have no business surviving in our zone.  Would the idea be to still list in our technical zone based on temperature scale with the caveat that we have this insulation boon?



It is a really good idea to indicate the snow cover you get but there may be so many "exceptions" to the zone that we may lose ourselves trying to catalog all that. In the plains, we can get serious winds that desiccate the trees. Should we take that into account too? Probably not, and yet, we make shelter belts to improve our chances.

While I agree in the main, even a  good reliable snow cover can only help you so much, maybe by one zone? In Central Wisconsin, we also get snow. I am in 4b, Continental but I'm not going to try peaches, or sweet cherries unless they are guaranteed for zone 4b, and not many are. It is iffy: (No, who am I kidding?: I'm too curious: I will 'try' a bunch of trees that will be at their northern limit, especially if I don't have to pay $40.00 for one! ;-))  

It is a characteristic of the Continental climate that it can vary wildly. We are going through a serious cold snap right now: This morning, we were at -29 F (but we've had -30 F about 20 years ago). Today, we have a nasty wind that brought the temperatures to -45 F with the windchill, and we will be at 35 F *above* in 2 or 3 days. That is quite a big variation in 48 hours!
I pile the mulch heavy before it snows and pull it away in the spring. If the roots have a good insulation blanket it does not automatically follow that the branches and buds above the snow won't die especially with our winds. Now, this cold snap is exceptional and is making the National News: For the first time ever, the mail will not be delivered and all our schools are closed. I would not count on it any more than I count on a "micro-climate". It is iffy, but let's start with the agreed upon zones and take care of variations as best we can. It is a good idea for your region, for sure.
 
Lauren Ritz
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James Landreth wrote:That's good to know Lauren. What other plants have you found that survive without irrigation after establishment? Do you grow any nut trees there?



The grapes did great without being irrigated during the summer. Concord and Interlaken. Currants are doing fine. The almond as well seems to be doing quite nicely. The old plum is massive and something like forty years old with weekly deep watering until about five years ago, watering only during fruiting since. The young plum was a grafted (purchased) tree and isn't doing nearly as well. Peaches died when I tried to transition to less water, and all were grown from seed but they were in the middle of a well watered lawn until five years ago. Because of easy access to water most of the roots were incredibly small--I was able to pull one tree out of the ground with my hands. I'm working on the walnut but I'm not sure how well it will do. It only gave us three walnuts last year, possibly because of drought stress. When I started watering more it put out catkins a second time, although nothing came of it. The grafted nectarine, again, isn't doing as well but it's surviving. It fruits just fine but it's staying small.

I was thinking about trying pistachios but I'm having a difficult time finding raw seeds for the varieties that do well in this area.

As I'm still in the process of transitioning to drought tolerant, I should find other things later. Most of the trees were already well established when I took over the yard. I currently have apple, pear and peach seedlings that will get a chance to grow on their own roots in drought conditions. We'll see how they do. I expect the apples will do well. Pears and peaches, we'll see. Peach seedlings appear to be doing OK so far, but I'm losing most of the pear seedlings. I have two left. Maybe half germinate, and most of those don't make it to their second year under my conditions.
 
Lauren Ritz
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Meg Mitchell wrote:Some of my favourite fruits are stone fruits and I'm very worried about how climate change is affecting their ability to flourish and ripen. If you have a cherry or plum tree (or even an apple tree) and all your blossoms come in during an early warm period, and then a colder period comes, oftentimes the blossoms will freeze and drop off and that's basically the end of your growing season for those fruits. \



I consistently get almonds and plums on trees that blossom over an extended period of time. Maybe that's what we should be breeding for. Even if there's a late frost, unless it spans weeks we usually get some kind of harvest. Of course, that won't work for commercial growers because they require a consolidated harvest period so everything can be pulled off the trees at once.
 
Steve Thorn
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Jay Angler wrote:@ Steve Thorn: you've only put Oceanic/Mediterranean as low as 8, but Vancouver Island tends to have pockets of 6 and 7, and I suspect Washington and Oregon would also. I just read this interesting explanation: "The Koppen classification system, developed by Russian German climatologist Wladimir Koppen in the late 19th century,  is one of the most widely used climate classification systems in the world.  Under the Koppen system, the world’s climates are classified into five main groups: A – Tropical, B – Dry, C – Temperate, D – Continental, and E – Polar.  Victoria falls in the the Temperate group, which is further classified based on the annual precipitation pattern, indicated by the second letter in the classification: s for dry summer, w for dry winter, and f for precipitation throughout the year.   So Cf would include Oceanic climates, like London, England, while Cs climates are termed Mediterranean.  To meet the criteria for a Cs climate, summer months must have less than one third the precipitation as the wettest winter month, and summer months must have less than 30 mm of precipitation.  Victoria easily meets these criteria, with July rainfall of just 13 mm – less than one tenth of our wettest month in December.  Mediterranean climates are further classified as Csa or Csb, depending on whether summers are hot (mean monthly temperature above 22 C) or warm (mean monthly temperature below 22 C).  Based on all these criteria, Victoria’s climate is classed as Csb, or warm summer Mediterranean.  Other locations with a Csb climate include San Francisco, Cape Town, and Porto, Portugal. "  from: http://victoriaweatherandclimate.blogspot.com/2016/01/a-mediterranean-climate.html

Wow - there's more to this climate thing when you start to dig, and weather weirding is only making it more interesting!

This suggests we could fit under Temperate, but since you had an area for Mediterranean, I wondered if that would be more appropriate?



That is interesting info!

I added an Oceanic/Mediterranean zone 6 and 7. I think 7 will be used a lot, specifically for Europe. After I made zone 6, I realized there might not be a whole lot of people in that zone, but I guess it will be there just in case.
 
Steve Thorn
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Lauren Ritz wrote:I consistently get almonds and plums on trees that blossom over an extended period of time. Maybe that's what we should be breeding for. Even if there's a late frost, unless it spans weeks we usually get some kind of harvest.



I think that's a great point Lauren!

I know that would be super helpful in my area. I'm definitely going to select for that when I start breeding fruit trees soon!

Of course, that won't work for commercial growers because they require a consolidated harvest period so everything can be pulled off the trees at once.



I think a lot of the varieties we have, have been selected to have an early bloom and harvest time with all the fruit ripening at one time, bred like this specifically for the commercial growers.

It's exciting to think about future varieties that will hopefully have late and lengthy bloom times with fruit ripening gradually. There may be some limits for this, but I think this area has great potential to be further developed!
 
Lauren Ritz
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Steve Thorn wrote:

Lauren Ritz wrote:I consistently get almonds and plums on trees that blossom over an extended period of time. Maybe that's what we should be breeding for. Even if there's a late frost, unless it spans weeks we usually get some kind of harvest.



I know that would be super helpful in my area. I'm definitely going to select for that when I start breeding fruit trees soon!


Consider using bud grafting from your young trees onto established trees for primary evaluation of fruit and budding habits. Maybe turn a 10 year project into one or two years.
 
Steve Thorn
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Lauren Ritz wrote:

Steve Thorn wrote:I know that would be super helpful in my area. I'm definitely going to select for that when I start breeding fruit trees soon!


Consider using bud grafting from your young trees onto established trees for primary evaluation of fruit and budding habits. Maybe turn a 10 year project into one or two years.



Awesome idea!

I had been thinking about regular grafting, but bud grafting could be done from a one year old plant, great tip Lauren!
 
Jay Angler
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@Dave Burton - Thank you so much!  J.
 
Lauren Ritz
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You've done a lot of work in a very short time.

Am I the only one waiting for the "dry" links to go up?

Thanks!
 
James Landreth
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Lauren, these are just a total shot in the dark, but is it possible to grow mulberries there? Maybe it's too cold out there or some other condition applies, but I'm told they are really drought tolerant once they're established. I'm hoping to get pistachios too someday, but right now the ones at One Green World are crazy expensive. Have you thought about hazelnuts, jujube, or apricot?
 
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James Landreth wrote:Lauren, these are just a total shot in the dark, but is it possible to grow mulberries there? ... I'm hoping to get pistachios too someday, but right now the ones at One Green World are crazy expensive. Have you thought about hazelnuts, jujube, or apricot?



Yes, mulberries grow here. Extremely drought tolerant, or so I'm told. There are mulberry trees planted by the pioneers just a few miles from here. I'm specifically looking for raw pistachio SEEDS so it'll be more likely to survive. I grew hazelnuts (or rather, my mother did) and they really struggled for about ten years before they expired of unnatural causes :). Jujube is a possibility but I'm in a subdivision and don't want something I plant invading the neighbor's lawns. I don't know of anyone in the area who grows them, so I can't say for sure how well they do. I have two apricot trees so far. I also have two serviceberry, but it appears to be a gopher magnet so I'm not sure if it will survive.
 
Steve Thorn
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Lauren Ritz wrote:You've done a lot of work in a very short time.

Am I the only one waiting for the "dry" links to go up?

Thanks!



They should be coming very soon!
 
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For those interested to find almost for any area the climate zone:

https://en.climate-data.org/

Unfortunately my region has 4 different zones in a very small area...
 
Jay Angler
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@Mike Homest - I was able to get the link to work, but the site itself needs patience and persistence to get to the useful level. You have to keep scrolling to the bottom to narrow your location down. (In my case, country then province then town.) Until you actually click on close locations, you don't get the monthly rainfall and high/low temp data that is actually meaningful to gardeners. In the summer, our day/night temps vary by about 10 Celsius, so when they give "daily average" it doesn't help nearly so much as knowing if the low is likely to mean freeze and if the high is high enough to ripen strawberries, for example. Despite its limitations, thanks for the link. I'm tempted to spend some time when I have it, taking a look at the data for a number of places mentioned on Permies, even if I know that averages are just that - extremes are sometimes more important and harder to find!
 
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