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I think if we get a lot of input from everyone here, this could be a super valuable resource for figuring out which fruit trees and berries will grow best in your area.

You are in the right spot if you are in a Continental Climate Hardiness Zone 3- warm to cool summers and very cold winters. In the winter, this zone can experience snowstorms, strong winds, and very cold temperatures(source)

If you think you are not in the right spot or you want to check your climate zone and hardiness zone for sure, click on the main thread to find out and get additional information Fruit Trees and Berries that Grow Best in Your Area Naturally and it will have a link to your specific climate zone and hardiness zone for you to post!


Familiar places in this area...

Winnipeg, Canada


(source)

This list won't be perfect, as there are so many different factors that affect a fruit tree's growth, but it should be a good help by seeing which trees do well for others in a similar area who have had success with a particular variety. By growing trees that are already slightly adapted to your area, saving the seeds, and growing new fruit trees, you could help create many more new varieties that are very adapted to your specific area!

Hardiness zones are one important factor and show the average annual minimum temperature for a location. You can click on https://garden.org/nga/zipzone/index.php?zip=27822&q=find_zone&submit=Go+%3E to find your exact hardiness zone, and there are also links to lots of other good information.


(source)

Fruit tree nurseries usually list hardiness zones for their fruit trees, but I've often found they tend to exaggerate the growing zones and are often unreliable.

They often leave out one very important aspect... climate zones.

What is a climate zone you may ask?

A climate zone takes other important things into consideration, such as humidity and rainfall. There are many different subsets and climate zones, but I believe this website does a great job of simplifying it into a few main climate zones of A-D below, and I'm adding Oceanic/Mediterranean due to their unique climate...

A) Tropical- hot and humid, average temperatures are greater than 64°F (18°C) year-round and there is more than 59 inches of precipitation each year

B) Dry- dry (not humid) and little precipitation

C) Temperate- warm and humid summers with thunderstorms and mild winters

D) Continental- warm to cool summers and very cold winters. In the winter, this zone can experience snowstorms, strong winds, and very cold temperatures—sometimes falling below -22°F (-30°C)!

E) Oceanic/Mediterranean- more average temperatures, not too hot in the summer or cold in the winter, usually has rainy winters and dry summers (source)



If you live in the US, you should be able to tell your general climate zone based on the map below and the descriptions above of what it should be like there.

I couldn't find a great general map for Canada and other countries, but you should be able to generally tell from the descriptions above. If you want to find out your exact climate zone, you can check out a cool map here World Climate Zones to find your zone with links at the bottom of the page based on the color, that you can click on with detailed information of your climate zone.


(source)

This should be a huge help to others with that same climate and hardiness zone to help them decide what to plant!

If you could post your general location in your state or country with your reply, that would be an awesome help!

The trees should be able to grow well naturally without extensive disease or pest control.
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Posts: 103
Location: Prairie Canada zone 2/3
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I'm in north-central Saskatchewan, Canada, zone 3 on the edge of zone 2.

Fruit trees and berries I've had luck with, that have survived at least 3 winters without special care:

Chokecherries (they grow wild here)
Serviceberries (also grow wild here)
Pincherries (wild)
Highbush Cranberries (wild)
Hazelnuts (the Beaked Hazelnut grows wild here; there are also hardy hybrids)
Wild Roses (wild)

Apples, including Honeycrisp, Battleford, Norland, Frostbite / Minnesota 447, and Rescue (crab)

Pears, including Ure and Golden Spice (I have several other varieties, but they haven't made 3 winters yet)

Plums, including Pembina and Brookred (again, I have others, but they are pretty new).  Black knot is endemic in the local wild chokecherry population, and in some ornamental trees in the towns / cities, so some plums won't do well here, even if they can survive the actual winter.

Grapes (particularly Valiant; I am experimenting with others)

Haskap / Honeyberries

Sour Cherries (particularly Carmine Jewel and the other University of Saskatchewan sour cherries)

Raspberries

Strawberries (planted in the ground, not a raised bed, and with straw or snow cover; however, there are also wild strawberries here)

Red Currants

Black Currants

Gooseberries

Mountain Ash

Rugosa Roses (particularly Hamsa)


I also have apricots, burr oaks, aronia / chokeberries, hawthorns, and butternuts, but they have only been through one winter.  I have been told black walnuts, hardy kiwi, chums, and shagbark hickory can do okay here, but have not planted any yet.


While they are not fruit, per se, rhubarb and asparagus do well here, as do hostas, nettles, and sunchokes.


I don't have any on my property, but blueberries grow well in acidic soil in areas in this zone.  My place does not have acidic enough soil for them to be happy.


 
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Posts: 532
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
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Jess Dee wrote:I'm in north-central Saskatchewan, Canada, zone 3 on the edge of zone 2.

Fruit trees and berries I've had luck with, that have survived at least 3 winters without special care:

Chokecherries (they grow wild here)
Serviceberries (also grow wild here)
Pincherries (wild)
Highbush Cranberries (wild)
Hazelnuts (the Beaked Hazelnut grows wild here; there are also hardy hybrids)
Wild Roses (wild)

Apples, including Honeycrisp, Battleford, Norland, Frostbite / Minnesota 447, and Rescue (crab)

Pears, including Ure and Golden Spice (I have several other varieties, but they haven't made 3 winters yet)

Plums, including Pembina and Brookred (again, I have others, but they are pretty new).  Black knot is endemic in the local wild chokecherry population, and in some ornamental trees in the towns / cities, so some plums won't do well here, even if they can survive the actual winter.

Grapes (particularly Valiant; I am experimenting with others)

Haskap / Honeyberries

Sour Cherries (particularly Carmine Jewel and the other University of Saskatchewan sour cherries)

Raspberries

Strawberries (planted in the ground, not a raised bed, and with straw or snow cover; however, there are also wild strawberries here)

Red Currants

Black Currants

Gooseberries

Mountain Ash

Rugosa Roses (particularly Hamsa)


I also have apricots, burr oaks, aronia / chokeberries, hawthorns, and butternuts, but they have only been through one winter.  I have been told black walnuts, hardy kiwi, chums, and shagbark hickory can do okay here, but have not planted any yet.


While they are not fruit, per se, rhubarb and asparagus do well here, as do hostas, nettles, and sunchokes.


I don't have any on my property, but blueberries grow well in acidic soil in areas in this zone.  My place does not have acidic enough soil for them to be happy.



Awesome list Jess!

I love how you listed varieties you have had success with, great info!
 
Jess Dee
Posts: 103
Location: Prairie Canada zone 2/3
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Steve Thorn wrote:
Awesome list Jess!

I love how you listed varieties you have had success with, great info!



Thank you! I hope it is helpful to someone.  One of my own early frustrations was knowing that apples would grow well here, but not being easily able to find / figure out which ones would work for me.  My list is by no means exhaustive, but might help someone find a starting point.  I was surprised at how many things really do grow here, but, on the other side, it can be quite a challenging climate for fruit and nut trees.  It is -42 C here today.  I guess it will weed out the marginally hardy.
 
Steve Thorn
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
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Jess Dee wrote:Thank you! I hope it is helpful to someone.  One of my own early frustrations was knowing that apples would grow well here, but not being easily able to find / figure out which ones would work for me. My list is by no means exhaustive, but might help someone find a starting point.  I was surprised at how many things really do grow here, but, on the other side, it can be quite a challenging climate for fruit and nut trees.  It is -42 C here today.  I guess it will weed out the marginally hardy.



I bet it will be very helpful!

I struggled with finding good ones for my area too, although my struggle was with the heat! I'm always searching for new varieties to add too!

Wow, that is cold!
 
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Also zone 3 (Minnesota near the Canadian border), and pretty new to growing things like fruits and nuts. I have few established trees, with the exception of one very old apple that I believe is a Haralson and has been here since long before I was. It does phenomenally, even through horrible weather. I've never had a failed crop in zone 3b, regardless of weather.

I have other apples but none established enough to recommend yet. The same goes for plums and pears. And the Manchurian apricots.

Other fruits and nuts I grow include:
Hazelbrush (productive, but the squirrels love them)

Red raspberries (wild, and the cultivars Latham, Boyne, and Killarney)

Serviceberries (no known cultivar, but my wild ones have been selected for fruit quality)

Highbush cranberries (I live in a swampy area and these guys love the permanently wet areas)

Blueberries (wild and both low and high bush varieties like Northblue, Chippewa, Superior, and Northcountry)

Wild plums (Canadian wild)

Rhubarb (it's used as a fruit, so it gets included)

Nanking bush cherries

Hansen's bush cherry

Carmine jewel sour cherry ( the nearby orchard also grows Romeo and Juliet varieties with great success)

Chokecherries (and chokeberries, though I didn't currently have any)

Strawberries (I have Honeoye and Sparkle)

Gooseberry (unknown cultivars, but they are green/white and red)

Currants (red and black but unknown cultivars)

That's all I can think of right now, especially this time of year. Other things I am growing but am unsure of their long-term survival are: autumn olive, pink popcorn blueberries, goji berries, black raspberries, and Siberian stone pine)

Other fruits that are in plans to try are mountain ash varieties Rabina and Shipova, Victory quince, elderberries, mulberries, lingonberry, bilberry, and grapes.

 
Steve Thorn
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
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Dem Krebs wrote:Also zone 3 (Minnesota near the Canadian border), and pretty new to growing things like fruits and nuts. I have few established trees, with the exception of one very old apple that I believe is a Haralson and has been here since long before I was. It does phenomenally, even through horrible weather. I've never had a failed crop in zone 3b, regardless of weather.

I have other apples but none established enough to recommend yet. The same goes for plums and pears. And the Manchurian apricots.

Other fruits and nuts I grow include:
Hazelbrush (productive, but the squirrels love them)

Red raspberries (wild, and the cultivars Latham, Boyne, and Killarney)

Serviceberries (no known cultivar, but my wild ones have been selected for fruit quality)

Highbush cranberries (I live in a swampy area and these guys love the permanently wet areas)

Blueberries (wild and both low and high bush varieties like Northblue, Chippewa, Superior, and Northcountry)

Wild plums (Canadian wild)

Rhubarb (it's used as a fruit, so it gets included)

Nanking bush cherries

Hansen's bush cherry

Carmine jewel sour cherry ( the nearby orchard also grows Romeo and Juliet varieties with great success)

Chokecherries (and chokeberries, though I didn't currently have any)

Strawberries (I have Honeoye and Sparkle)

Gooseberry (unknown cultivars, but they are green/white and red)

Currants (red and black but unknown cultivars)

That's all I can think of right now, especially this time of year. Other things I am growing but am unsure of their long-term survival are: autumn olive, pink popcorn blueberries, goji berries, black raspberries, and Siberian stone pine)

Other fruits that are in plans to try are mountain ash varieties Rabina and Shipova, Victory quince, elderberries, mulberries, lingonberry, bilberry, and grapes.



Wonderful list Dem with great plants and specific varieties!
 
Jess Dee
Posts: 103
Location: Prairie Canada zone 2/3
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I did up a blog post of apple varieties that are hardy to zone 2 or 3 (many of which we have here at my place in Saskatchewan), plus links to Canadian suppliers, which may be useful:

16 Hardy Apple Trees for Zone 2&3

 
Steve Thorn
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, NC, US
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Jess Dee wrote:I did up a blog post of apple varieties that are hardy to zone 2 or 3 (many of which we have here at my place in Saskatchewan), plus links to Canadian suppliers, which may be useful:

16 Hardy Apple Trees for Zone 2&3



Neat info Jess, enjoyed the blog post!
 
Jess Dee
Posts: 103
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Steve Thorn wrote:

Neat info Jess, enjoyed the blog post!



Thanks, Steve - I hope it was useful!
 
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