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Easiest Fruit Tree to Grow

 
garden master
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What would you recommend to a brand new gardener as the easiest fruit tree to grow? This may differ greatly based on climate, temperature, and location, but should give great insight for people living nearby what could be a good fruit tree to start with!

Fruit trees have amazing potential to produce a large harvest with little maitenance if grown naturally.

For my area, I would recommend pears and plums!

Reasons I would recommend them...

1) The varieties I have planted have been generally healthy and free from disease.

2) They often grow quickly, usually even in a variety of soils.

3) I especially love to eat plums, which gives me extra motivation to try to get a good harvest!

Can you think of anything I've missed about pears and plums being easy to grow?

What would you recommend to a new gardener as the easiest fruit tree to grow?
 
pollinator
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Jujube.  No problems with insects or disease.  Mine produced fruit the second year.  
BUT They have thorns.  Not a problem when picking the fruit but the tree will grab you when mowing around.  They also produce root suckers.  Taste like the sweetest little apples you ever ate.
 
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Pears seem like the least trouble and thrive the best, unfortunately not my favorite fruit.  Asian pears seem to be less prone to problems.
 
Steve Thorn
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Dennis Bangham wrote:Jujube.  No problems with insects or disease.



That is awesome, such a big plus!

Mine produced fruit the second year.



I love when a fruit tree produces a quick harvest like that, very good to know!

Taste like the sweetest little apples you ever ate.



Definitely going to have to plant one of these soon!
 
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Pears is a good one based on my experience. My original trees went through a terror for 2 years. Deer girdling them, 6 weeks of standing water, several months of hi temperature drought. The pear survived where others didnt.

Nice to see jujube mentioned. I planted 2 last year.
 
Steve Thorn
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Mike Schroer wrote:Pears seem like the least trouble and thrive the best, unfortunately not my favorite fruit.



I've had that same experience.

Asian pears seem to be less prone to problems.



Good info!
 
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Nikita's Gift persimmon (American x Oriental). No bug, disease, or animal problems. Fruit the 4th year. Delicious, nutritious, no care. I got mine at Burnt Ridge.
https://www.burntridgenursery.com/mobile/NIKITAS-GIFT-TM-AMERICAN-PERSIMMON-Diospyrus-kaki-x-virginiana/productinfo/NSPRNIK/
 
Steve Thorn
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wayne fajkus wrote:Pears is a good one based on my experience. My original trees went through a terror for 2 years. Deer girdling them, 6 weeks of standing water, several months of hi temperature drought. The pear survived where others didn't.



I had one go through almost the same thing, and it sailed right through it too!
 
Steve Thorn
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Woody McInish wrote:Nikita's Gift persimmon (American x Oriental). No bug, disease, or animal problems. Fruit the 4th year. Delicious, nutritious, no care.



That's awesome!

How would you describe the flavor? I tried one from the grocery store, and it didn't have much taste, but I figured they probably picked it very unripe to ship it.
 
Woody McInish
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Steve Thorn wrote:

Woody McInish wrote:Nikita's Gift persimmon (American x Oriental). No bug, disease, or animal problems. Fruit the 4th year. Delicious, nutritious, no care.



That's awesome!

How would you describe the flavor? I tried one from the grocery store, and it didn't have much taste, but I figured they probably picked it very unripe to ship it.



I'm sure the one you tried was an Oriental and not a NG cross. The NG is sweet and crispy early ripening to very sweet, juicy, and soft later.
 
Steve Thorn
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Woody McInish wrote:I'm sure the one you tried was an Oriental and not a NG cross. The NG is sweet and crispy early ripening to very sweet, juicy, and soft later.



Awesome info Woody!

Yeah I think the one I tasted was a Fuyo I believe.
 
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Asian Pears. (Eastern Pennsylvania) zero issues every year even when I lose everything else (apples, peaches, plums, appricot, cherry, other pears). Japanese beetles don't touch them.
Persimmon is my next in line but smaller yields of smaller fruit (and I lost the entire crop last year).
 
Steve Thorn
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Paul Lutz wrote:Asian Pears. (Eastern Pennsylvania) zero issues every year even when I lose everything else (apples, peaches, plums, appricot, cherry, other pears). Japanese beetles don't touch them.
Persimmon is my next in line but smaller yields of smaller fruit (and I lost the entire crop last year).



That's great to know about the Japanese beetles too, because they are bad here every year, swarming my poor cherries this year!
 
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My Nikita’s Gifts are too mushy and too sweet.  Before they are mushy, they always are at least a little bitter. I pick them just before they soften and dehydrate them. That takes the bitterness out. Add nuts for great trail mix. They are pretty carefree trees. Tiny seeds and huge fruits. They ripen in  late October or even November here. That’s great because it’s not a very busy time for me. I have had some fall web worms. I much prefer the taste of American persimmons.

Montmorency Cherry has been my most reliable and carefree tree. Over about ten years I had one year the codling moths ruined them. Other years varied but were pretty productive.

Fireblight wiped out my pears.

I know you asked about trees, but thornless blackberries are extremely productive and need very little care. Also they can produce a good crop in the second year, and you can plant them between your trees. They like some shade here.
 
Steve Thorn
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Ken W Wilson wrote:My Nikita’s Gifts are too mushy and too sweet.  Before they are mushy, they always are at least a little bitter. I pick them just before they soften and dehydrate them. That takes the bitterness out. Add nuts for great trail mix. They are pretty carefree trees. Tiny seeds and huge fruits. They ripen in  late October or even November here. That’s great because it’s not a very busy time for me. I have had some fall web worms. I much prefer the taste of American persimmons.



That's a good strategy to dehydrate them to take the bitterness out!

Montmorency Cherry has been my most reliable and carefree tree. Over about ten years I had one year the codling moths ruined them. Other years varied but were pretty productive.



I'm hoping my cherries do ok with the fruit this year, hoping to get a first harvest from them this summer!

Fireblight wiped out my pears.



I get fireblight occasionally here too. I've had success if I catch it early by cutting off the branch a good bit ahead of the infection and burning the branches.

I know you asked about trees, but thornless blackberries are extremely productive and need very little care. Also they can produce a good crop in the second year, and you can plant them between your trees. They like some shade here.



That's good to hear! I planted some this year around some of my fruit trees, can't wait to taste them next year hopefully!
 
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Sour cherry is a very tough tree. No pests, needs very little water or none at all depending on climate, grows fast. You can eat them raw off the tree but most people prefer baking with them...they are a bit on the tart side.
 
Steve Thorn
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Nathan Watson wrote:Sour cherry is a very tough tree. No pests, needs very little water or none at all depending on climate, grows fast. You can eat them raw off the tree but most people prefer baking with them...they are a bit on the tart side.



I haven't planted one yet, but I love sour cherries! I've heard they're usually more vigorous than sweet cherries, which is nice.

Mmm, a cherry cobbler sounds so good right now!

 
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Crataegus schraderiana.  Mine is grafted and is about 7 or 8 foot tall, and bears kilos of big deep red berries that the birds show no interest in, and that make dark pink appley-tasting jam that sets well.  Not much fun to eat raw because of the skin and pips (which I sieve off to make the jam), but in terms of easy it's fab.  Nice thick blossom in May, attractive cut silvery leaves.  Difficult to get to germinate (I'm still trying!)  
 
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Hester Winterbourne wrote:Crataegus schraderiana.  Mine is grafted and is about 7 or 8 foot tall, and bears kilos of big deep red berries that the birds show no interest in, and that make dark pink appley-tasting jam that sets well.  Not much fun to eat raw because of the skin and pips (which I sieve off to make the jam), but in terms of easy it's fab.  Nice thick blossom in May, attractive cut silvery leaves.  Difficult to get to germinate (I'm still trying!)  



Very neat!

That's commonly called blue hawthorn right? Sounds easy to grow and the jam sounds delicious!
 
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Guava grows wild in my area, it litters the roadsides. [Makes good wine]

The next easiest in my climate is the Brazilian Cherry - its super-tart flavor can blow your head off, but you get used to it and its highly concentrated vitamin C.
Often used as a hedge, fruit are thin-skinned and prone to pest damage, but prolific enough for all the wildlife to share with some left over.
[And makes good wine]
 
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The big ones in my area (Virginia 7b/8a)... the ones I see in 1 out of say 8 homes here in the suburbs... that are completely neglected and still produce are...

Figs

Just let them grow in their natural form in full Sun and they will be either a medium to large bush depending on type. They make 2 crops a year too!

The other big one would be mulberries. The black varieties have the most flavor. Just be sure to keep them away from where cars will be. Well actually, birds love them too. So a little further away than that. Dwarf everbearing seems like a good one to plant under a field of say pecan trees or some other large nut bearing tree. The berries will bring in the poop/fertilizer. Mulberries are immune to the juglone that black walnuts and their ilk produce.
 
Steve Thorn
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Jondo Almondo wrote:Guava grows wild in my area, it litters the roadsides. [Makes good wine]

The next easiest in my climate is the Brazilian Cherry - its super-tart flavor can blow your head off, but you get used to it and its highly concentrated vitamin C.
Often used as a hedge, fruit are thin-skinned and prone to pest damage, but prolific enough for all the wildlife to share with some left over.
[And makes good wine]



That's awesome Jondo!

It's so nice when there are good wild edibles around!

So cool with the Brazilian cherry, that it produces enough for everyone!

 
Steve Thorn
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Marty Mitchell wrote:The big ones in my area (Virginia 7b/8a)... the ones I see in 1 out of say 8 homes here in the suburbs... that are completely neglected and still produce are...

Figs

Just let them grow in their natural form in full Sun and they will be either a medium to large bush depending on type. They make 2 crops a year too!

The other big one would be mulberries. The black varieties have the most flavor. Just be sure to keep them away from where cars will be. Well actually, birds love them too. So a little further away than that. Dwarf everbearing seems like a good one to plant under a field of say pecan trees or some other large nut bearing tree. The berries will bring in the poop/fertilizer. Mulberries are immune to the juglone that black walnuts and their ilk produce.



Great information Marty!

I think we may be in very similar climates. I've heard figs grow like weeds here too. I haven't planted any yet but hope to soon!

I've planted a few varieties of mulberries and am super excited to hopefully taste them soon!
 
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I'd go with fig trees, easy to grow and easy to propagate, fruit ripening all summer long too.

Of all of our fruit trees (plum, pear, peach, fig, apple) the ones that I seem to have to fuss over are the apple trees.
 
Steve Thorn
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:I'd go with fig trees, easy to grow and easy to propagate, fruit ripening all summer long too.



Awesome!

Of all of our fruit trees (plum, pear, peach, fig, apple) the ones that I seem to have to fuss over are the apple trees.



That's been the same for me too. I wish they were a little easier!
 
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