Denise Cares

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since Oct 12, 2018
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books food preservation wood heat
USDA Zone 7a
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Recent posts by Denise Cares

For anyone interested here's a couple of extensive reference lists of research on the effects of EMF on the health of humans/animals.   Sadly the telecommunications giants wish to have us overlook the accumulating preponderance of data as they push installation of 5G cell towers throughout the US.  
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1V3n0962PtWWB-gzcfF85TglEC4iZAOeq/view

https://europaem.eu/attachments/article/130/2018-04_EU-EMF2018-5US.pdf
2 weeks ago

Mark Tudor wrote:The following is understanding that PEP=Permaculture Experiences (according to) Paul, the idea is generalizing some tasks. I wonder if instead of having specific species like black locust or willow, the plants listed should be based on function. There might also be a list of plants (surely some lists already exist out on them interwebs) which fulfill each category, including the growing range like USDA zones, as well as water needs once established (arid - dry - moderate - wet - rainforest).

So instead of saying black locust, perhaps you use "nitrogen fixing tree" or "silvopasture leaf fodder" or "rot resistant wood". Then a person looks at a list like "Nitrogen Fixer Trees: Black Locust, Mimosa, Alder, Redbud, Autumn Olive, Kentucky Coffee Tree, Golden Chain Tree, Acacia, Mesquite, etc etc" and they can find something which will adapt to their existing environment?



Mark I like your suggestion for adapting to different locales/growing zones.  I always learn a lot from reading these threads...like for example that the Mimosa and Redbuds are nitrogen fixing.  They are both growing on my property - I planted them over the years.  Nice to know they are beneficial for the perennials added to the primarily late succession land.
3 weeks ago
It would be a real privilege to be able to attend a full PDC !  I'm currently enrolled in an on-line class Observation for Permaculture Design taught by Alan Booker and am learning so much.  The science behind Permaculture Design is so fascinating.  I have lots of questions which go beyond what can be dealt with during the OPD course.  I'd highly recommend anyone who is able to attend a PDC course to do so!
3 weeks ago
Where did you go?  I've enjoyed cruising thru some of your posts.  Beautiful garden and so many neat ideas!  I'm wanting to replicate your "buried wood beds" - if you could please explain how you make one?  Thanks and I hope I can find more of your posts.
4 months ago
Is any of this equipment powerful enough to get water from a well when the power goes out?  Is there a solar set-up that would work as back-up power?
4 months ago
Hello Everyone,
So this is a bit of a silly question but could someone clarify what is the benefit of leaf mold over compost?  Are there different end uses for each of them?  Certain plants that prefer one over the other?  I'm getting the idea that leaf mold germinates mushrooms and that compost does not.  That compost needs to be hot and leaf mold does best cold but takes longer to finish.  So why do we prefer leaf mold?  Would it ruin the leaf mold if I added some rabbit manure/bedding to the pile of leaves?  Would it be better to cover it during heavy winter rain/snow?  Thanks
4 months ago
Hello Aimee,  Do you have an email or phone I can contact you on?  Thank you much.  Dee
This makes sense.  The Bible talks about noticing the certain growth of plants and trees to mark seasons - so why not to indicate planting time for other plants?
Matthew 24:32
Now learn a parable of the fig tree; When his branch is yet tender, and putteth forth leaves, ye know that summer is nigh:
Here is the remaining match.

Luke 21:30
Behold the fig tree, and all the trees;
When they now shoot forth, ye see and know of your own selves that summer is now nigh at hand.