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Endless supply of free pallets...  RSS feed

 
Cortland Satsuma
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We have little around here that goes for free. However, the abundant half and full pallets are available for the taking in mass! I saw the unique pallet bed; but, have no need for it. If you had a ton of pallets available to work with, what would you use them for? (Any pictures would be great, too!)
 
Michael Cox
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Salvaged wood can make all sorts of things. I saw a huge chicken house the was made entirely from pallet wood.

With some wood working skills you can biscuit and glue boards together to make larger pieces - time consuming, but if you have good quality hardwood you could get as far as making nice furniture with it. Around here we occasionally get pallets made with oak. I've only had one or two though, never enough to do anything meaningful with.
 
Michael Cox
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Pallet wood eye candy...
 
Cortland Satsuma
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Hi Michael,

We mainly have soft pine pallets available. I have not seen any hardwood ones. Thank you for posting the link! Those are some great ideas!
 
R Scott
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You can make beautiful furniture from pallet wood. http://www.naturalbuildingblog.com/pallet-wood-kitchen-cabinets/#more-10112

The "ugly" pieces can be drawer bottoms and backs to furniture (just like it was back in pioneer days).

The broken pieces and stuck nails are firewood (just run a magnet through the ashes before you dump them).

You can use it for siding or shakes. We have a chicken tractor that is 90% pallet wood.

 
Craig Dobbson
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I use them:
to stack fire wood on.
to make fences or large compost bins. I bind them with wire but you can nail or screw them too.
for hugelkulture with rotted ones
to keep chickens from scratching the hillside soil down while plants establish themselves in the soil .
for wind breaks
for critter housing (wild or domestic)
for campfire wood (easy way to recover nails)





 
Jennifer Wadsworth
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Permaculture site in Amman, Jordan. Toolshed made from pallets.

 
John Polk
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Have you checked out Paul's Pallet Fence video?



 
leila hamaya
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Craig Dobbelyu wrote:I use them:
to stack fire wood on.
to make fences or large compost bins. I bind them with wire but you can nail or screw them too.
for hugelkulture with rotted ones
for wind breaks
for campfire wood (easy way to recover nails)


yep ^^^^ i've done most of that


i have a thing for making stuff with pallets, especially cause i had an excellent source for them at at a nearby car dealership at my last place.
car dealerships are the best for pallets cause the car parts come in extra big thick ones.
they had HUGEY pallets, hardwood and softwood pallets, sometimes even boxes and other cool wood for free, every time i went by there on my way home i would stop and fill up mu truck with a big load of them. keep the good ones for building stuff and use the broken up pieces for kindling

i've made

fences, both as is and by taking them apart and using the wood for nailing on a fence
simple clothes dryer (just stick a couple in a sunny place upright and then tuck all your wet clothes in the slats with or without clothespins)
taken them apart and made interior walls with them
benches for sitting outside
a tool box, for storing tools
window boxes for planting
laying on the most flooded spots for walking on in the wet season and not having your feet covered in mud


oooo i am sure theres more but thats all i can think of at the moment.
 
Cortland Satsuma
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Everyone...Thank you! Great ideas, Pictures, and Video! I am not sure what niche they can fill here; but, I am certain we will find something...I hate to see a resource stream not being tapped.
 
Cj Sloane
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I stack hay on pallets.
 
Dale Hodgins
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I've stacked about 500,000 reclaimed bricks on pallets gathered for free from a roofing supply.

There used to be an old guy in town who would show up at job sites with pallets that he'd scrounged. For $2 each, he would distribute them around sites where lumber, pipes or other stuff needed to stay off the mud. At the end of the job, you call him to take them away. Very handy and a good pass time for a chatty old guy. He was a firewood hound. The cost of his service was so low that I made a point of saving him a nice pile of wood, so he would have more than the usual $20 for his efforts.
 
John Polk
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We end up with quite a few that are damaged.
Those have supplied about 10% of our heat this winter.

The nail, removed from the ash with a magnet, are probably enough to build a chicken coop.
"Waste not, want not."

 
Philip Durso
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Dale Hodgins
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Some pallets from tropical places are made of unique woods not usually found in the temperate zones. Certain importers end up with these. I had one made from a very hard, reddish wood. It was from Indonesia. You may never know what wood your new shelves are made from, and that can be part of the story when your work is admired.
 
Chris Badgett
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I like to use used pallets for stacking firewood on and even as firewood itself.
 
Dale Hodgins
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This is a design for a smoker or a dehydrator which is shaped roughly like a refrigerator. Get a dozen stove shelves or refrigerator shelves, roughly the same size. Use 3 long pallets to form the sides. Two small ones can form the base and roof. Nail battens in place to hold the shelves. Cob in and around every surface of the pallets, so that they are completely encased in cob. You may want to cover the wood in chicken wire, so the cob will adhere better. Now you have a cob oven style smoker or dehydrator that will store quite a bit of solar heat or RMH heat etc. A glass door faces south if it's a dehydrator. A metal clad door for a smoker. Ventilate it. A solar collector could make it work faster. It needs a rain hat during wet weather.

Used as a dehydrator, this unit would dry out really well when not in use, so that it is super thirsty when required. It would store heat and continue working into the night. Most problems with mold have to do with a stoppage of air flow at night. Problem solved. It should be black inside and out.

Bam! Knocked that one out of the park.
 
Cortland Satsuma
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Yes, you did, Dale...Thanks!
 
Judith Browning
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Dale Hodgins wrote:This is a design for a smoker or a dehydrator which is shaped roughly like a refrigerator. Get a dozen stove shelves or refrigerator shelves, roughly the same size. Use 3 long pallets to form the sides. Two small ones can form the base and roof. Nail battens in place to hold the shelves. Cob in and around every surface of the pallets, so that they are completely encased in cob. You may want to cover the wood in chicken wire, so the cob will adhere better. Now you have a cob oven style smoker or dehydrator that will store quite a bit of solar heat or RMH heat etc. A glass door faces south if it's a dehydrator. A metal clad door for a smoker. Ventilate it. A solar collector could make it work faster. It needs a rain hat during wet weather.

Used as a dehydrator, this unit would dry out really well when not in use, so that it is super thirsty when required. It would store heat and continue working into the night. Most problems with mold have to do with a stoppage of air flow at night. Problem solved. It should be black inside and out.

Bam! Knocked that one out of the park.


I am pretty sure you shouldn't use refrigerator shelves for anything that will heat up...seems like i remember hearing about people being poisoned from (chromium?cadmium?) being released with heat I think it was when using them over a camp fire though and maybe just in older shelves.
 
R Scott
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Yeah, Judith. They should be fine as a dehydrator or smoker (never getting above 200 F) but stove racks are safer.

Newer fridges/freezers are plastic coated, anyway, and that just won't work.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Judith Browning wrote:
Dale Hodgins wrote:This is a design for a smoker or a dehydrator which is shaped roughly like a refrigerator. Get a dozen stove shelves or refrigerator shelves, roughly the same size. Use 3 long pallets to form the sides. Two small ones can form the base and roof. Nail battens in place to hold the shelves. Cob in and around every surface of the pallets, so that they are completely encased in cob. You may want to cover the wood in chicken wire, so the cob will adhere better. Now you have a cob oven style smoker or dehydrator that will store quite a bit of solar heat or RMH heat etc. A glass door faces south if it's a dehydrator. A metal clad door for a smoker. Ventilate it. A solar collector could make it work faster. It needs a rain hat during wet weather.

Used as a dehydrator, this unit would dry out really well when not in use, so that it is super thirsty when required. It would store heat and continue working into the night. Most problems with mold have to do with a stoppage of air flow at night. Problem solved. It should be black inside and out.

Bam! Knocked that one out of the park.


I am pretty sure you shouldn't use refrigerator shelves for anything that will heat up...seems like i remember hearing about people being poisoned from (chromium?cadmium?) being released with heat I think it was when using them over a camp fire though and maybe just in older shelves.


Thanks Judith --- I've investigated this for a few minutes. All references seem to go back to a family who were poisoned by cadmium used as a barbecue grill in 1959. It was the first firing of the grill. Most fridge shelves today have a coating over the metal. A dehydrator will never reach those temperatures, but still there could be some risk from the shiny metal shelves from old fridges. I guess it would be important to discover the properties of plastic coatings before heating them up. Oven shelves are much stronger. Most ovens go up to 550 F, so they should work fine.
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Back to the idea of continuing the drying throughout the night. Suppose we build a flat plate solar collector from strong 2x8 with an insulated plywood bottom. This would be strong enough that it could have 4 inches of dark colored rocks laid in the bottom. The rocks would heat up over the day and the panel would continue sending hot, dry convective currents to the dehydrator long after dark. An insulating blanket placed over the glass would help.
 
Cortland Satsuma
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@Dale...

That is a great additional idea! By any chance, do you have any drawings to post? Also, your idea would be a benefit to other threads! I have one going on cheap smokers...I think your idea should be added there, too (If you do post it there as well, I have some ideas to bounce off you related directly to smokers.) I appreciate your sharing your resourceful ideas with us!

@Everyone...

Thank you! You each have unique uses and ideas...lots for us to consider.
 
Natalie McVander
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I built a small goat milking shed and feed storage with 6 large pallets, the kind the mower tractors are shipped in.

The parlor was about 6 foot square and the two side walls were 6 foot high, the ends I left open.
Two more pallets were used to created the peaked roof.

Then two more pallets were used to connect to the one side as a lean-to feed storage, which I enclosed with other scrap lumber.

I set it all on blocks to keep it from rotting, and anchored the walls in 6 locations to the ground so wind would not take it away.
I connected all the wall bases with boards so it didn't splay out, then filled it with a few bags of gravel so milking wasn't a muddy chore.

A few built-in shelves, including a short loft for extra storage, a cut open doorway between the two rooms, and a large tarp (which I replaced every 2 or 3 years) was stapled over the roof and remaining sides.

I built a beautiful and sturdy millking stand and it looked very nice, thickly coated in glossy green paint, sitting there being used by happy goats.

I had a very useful shed for many years for only 50 dollars - about 75 square feet, I suppose.
 
Cortland Satsuma
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@Natalie...

What great ideas! Do you have any pictures from your awesome projects? I would love to see them.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Cortland, I will make some drawings and check out those other threads.

Here's a way to improve a no post pallet fence on a windy site or where animals push on it. Attach wire mesh under the lowest slats to form a gabion basket. Fill it with rubble rock. If the bottom foot were filled with rock, those fences would work almost anywhere with no need for posts. Rain would flow through. Do this to the north side of heat loving plants for a heat storing, wind blocking Trombe wall. Unheated sheds and trellises on windy sites could be given ballast by this method. Snow fences too.
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Small cob structures of all sorts would go up fast if a pallet frame were infilled. Papercrete, straw clay, woodchip clay and earth bag construction could be made on a pallet form work.

Abe Connely's Rapidobe system could be a model for earth filled pallet walls using free lumber covering tarps.

Both sides of pallets could be covered in wire to form gabion walls for warm climate barns.
 
Natalie McVander
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All my pictures are on an external hard drive that's elsewhere at the moment.

But I did make a visit to my old farm blog and found this picture.

It was the nearest one I had taken to the shed.

I just tried the upload attachment file, so we'll see how it comes out here.
goat-shed-and-dp-party.jpg
[Thumbnail for goat-shed-and-dp-party.jpg]
Pasture party - with goat milking shed.
 
Natalie McVander
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maybe this one is closer
turned-garden-plot-and-shed.jpg
[Thumbnail for turned-garden-plot-and-shed.jpg]
 
Cortland Satsuma
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@ Natalie...Thank You!


@Dale...

Great additional idea! I Could do that for some of my short term fence needs. We are trying to keep all our wood fencing cosistent; but, we do keep moving them as we move along on our plans. It would be great to be able to erect a no post fence to close off the gap area, as we move the rest of the fencing around. It could also be used as the backing to our currently unsuccessful live fence / hedge rows on our property line.. This could help us save a LOT on our fencing investments. Thank You! I look forward to your smoker drawings, as well. It is a great idea and I hope others benefit from it as well!
 
Roberto pokachinni
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I've often thought of building a structure that is post and beam (we have lots of logs here), and infilling the walls with pallets. The pallets could be measured, and set in groups of equal measurements, and posts could be placed so that they butt up against the outside edges of the pallets at these measured spacings. Which would be quite solid. The walls could then be covered on the exterior or the interior with wire mesh, or infilled as dale mentioned with cob or other materials.

I have seen a great treehouse that was built out of pallets and lots of plastic baler twine.

I've made compost bins with baler twine lashed pallets. The beauty of pallet compost bins is that you can put a large group of compost bins to rotate all stabilizing each other and sharing pallet walls. If you think of the sides of the letter E all being pallets, there would be 5 pallets. You can add on so that there are E's back to back (sharing a back), or you can add an E to the end, sharing one _ of the E. In a single E formation, one bin in that formation could hold just leaves. The other is where you throw your nitrogenous waste, and layer some of those leaves on it. Or the bin could be last season's compost which you are digging into and using and the one beside it would be this years, that you are building. An E sun catch is quite stable, and provides all kinds of micro-climates for plants.

If you google pallets, and pallet furniture, and pallet projects, etc you will come up with a lot more ideas, and some interesting videos/photos.

There are also pallet breaking/separating tools that can be very helpful if you are getting really into that.
 
Natalie McVander
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Also saw some very cool decks and patios on a google image search.
Building a deck is so expensive, but adds so much to outdoor living.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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Natalie your deck comment reminded me (because I grew up on a wet coast and a covered deck is best there) about using pallets for making a roof, or as arbors and shade ramadas. I saw ramada's built of pallets in AZ and in Utah. They have just enough wood to block some light, and just enough spaces to let the hot air out of a ramada with just a bit of brush on top.
 
Natalie McVander
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Sounds like what I went looking for at first.

I saw a video of an out door building (I searched 'patio') made of pallets so the walls were see through, but the roof was solid.

It was so pretty and airy. I loved it. This particular one actually had separate sections so it had the feel of a small cottage that was open to the world, yet cozy.

I'd love to build one!
 
Dale Hodgins
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Dale's Pallet Lock --- for mobile pallet fences.

This is a simple locking device for a pallet fence similar to the one in the video.

All pallets must be stood the same way so that they are of matching height. The lock consists of two lengths of 2x4 in a T-shape with angle bracing nailed on top. Lock blocks of 4x4 are nailed to the bottom sides of the 2x4s. The pallets are held in place and the T-Lock is placed on top. It is hammered down until the snug fitting lock blocks are inserted into the pallet top. The wood with an end grain drawn on, are 2x4 scraps which reinforce the pallet and prevent the lock blocks from sliding around.

This is a top view looking down on the fence. It is of three pallets, one to the left and one to the right of the brace pallet. --- The animals would be on the side at the top of your screen. Any pressure that they exert would push on the brace pallet so that there are no nails or screws to tear through. Brace pallets could be given the 1 foot gabion bottom treatment. Move them with a fridge cart.

We'll cal the lower pallet the brace pallet and those facing the animals the fence pallets. Two fence pallets meet in the center of each brace pallet.
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For easily fenced critters, just the angle braces with wooden dowels hammered into holes drilled in the 2x4 scraps might be sufficient.
A triangular scrap of plywood would strengthen and simplify construction of the 2x4 t-shape.
IMAG5019.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMAG5019.jpg]
 
Cortland Satsuma
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@Dale...

Thank you, that is very helpful! Now, I just need to see where I can incorporate it into our land plan.


@Dale, Natalie, Roberto...

The internet searches can be difficult to weed through; having real people, like yourselves with first hand knowlege and experience sharing here is far more mtivating to myself and all others who read this thread. Free pallets exist in every port of the world and many places where freight travels as well...Providing an easy access thread of great ideas can help individuals everywhere put an often wasted resource to good uses that meet their land plan needs. Thank you!
 
Roberto pokachinni
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Totally agree with your point of view Cortland. Just wanted to point out that there are tons of great inspiring projects out there to view if you hadn't searched it out.

Dale... Dude, that's a great lock system for connecting pallets! I can see that being super snug, and stable especially with the gambion bottom you were talking about.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Thanks Roberto.

Carrying the gabion thing a little further
--- Gabion pallet animal shelter ---
Build this as you would build a shed from pallets. Fill the walls with rubble rock. Stucco or earth plaster the outside. This would give excellent predator protection even without stucco. It could be movable using an L-lock. Windy places with hot days and cold nights would benefit most. The shelter would present a welcome reprieve from the heat of the day and from frigid nights. Sheep and goats who read this already want one.

Unheated workshops and sheds would also benefit from thermal mass and tough theft resistant walls.
 
Cortland Satsuma
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Dale Hodgins wrote:Thanks Roberto.

Carrying the gabion thing a little further
--- Gabion pallet animal shelter ---
Build this as you would build a shed from pallets. Fill the walls with rubble rock. Stucco or earth plaster the outside. This would give excellent predator protection even without stucco. It could be movable using an L-lock. Windy places with hot days and cold nights would benefit most. The shelter would present a welcome reprieve from the heat of the day and from frigid nights. Sheep and goats who read this already want one.

Unheated workshops and sheds would also benefit from thermal mass and tough theft resistant walls.


Great Idea Dale...and, I am sure they do!
 
Natalie McVander
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Dale Hodgins wrote: Sheep and goats who read this already want one.



LOL

I Love this idea. Kudos!
 
Tom Strode
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The hardest part of using pallets is breaking them down. There are a bunch of prybars shown on You-tube for doing that. But they work your back and shoulders. Here is a much better idea
He has other videos on how to make it and pull the nails and lots of other things.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
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