Mark Seasigh

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since Jun 04, 2019
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Recent posts by Mark Seasigh

I mean, if it’s not fire blight and something less harmful I’d like to try treating this problem with a different method.

I’m sick of pruning away all of the previous year’s growth on trees that have these spots.

=M=
8 months ago
This is my Ichiban Asian Pear tree...

I’ve had these black spots before, and just pruned them out thinking it is fire blight.

Is this fire blight or not?

=M=
8 months ago
Here’s some pics of strawberries and the spots I mentioned.

Most leaves are spot free, but I also removed a bunch of leaves a week ago hoping to combat the blight in this fashion. Thought it worked, but they have returned once again on very healthy new growth.

=M=

I also posted a picture of my in ground Emperor Francis sweet cherry tree. He hangs out with me in the greenhouse while I jam out to music and such.

: )
8 months ago
So, I recently decided to move some of my 3-4 year old strawberry plants into my new greenhouse...

It was a great idea, as I’m sure you are thinking right now...

However, I have strawberry plants that have developed common leaf spot caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fragariae...

Furthermore, I remember this same issue when they were growing in my yard. This fungus causes round purple spots to appear on the top of the strawberry leaves. They fruit fine; in fact, I already have a few sets of flower buds in the greenhouse after only two weeks. When they were growing in my yard, the berries were large, sweet, and juicy. I expect the same results or better now that they are in the greenhouse.

The fungus does not seem to harm the fruit, in fact the only thing it seems to do is make me feel bad for the little buggers.

I did some research, and a university suggested a fungicide; which after searching for it online I realized that a tiny bottle is around 300$ a pop. I would really rather have a more cost effective organic method to cure my poor berry plants of this affliction.

I know that many of you on this site are very knowledgeable, and I’d appreciate your opinions.

Also...

If any of you grow strawberries in a greenhouse I wanted to ask you if you are able to get constant flushed through the year with day neutral/ever bearing varieties... This is my goal, to have a constant flow of delicious large strawberries all year long.

If this is possible, or if you have achieved this goal already, please feel free to drop me some advice, or possibly some pictures of your operation.

Thanks in advance,

Your fellow strawberry conscious friend,

Mark

=M=

P.S.

I’ll post some pictures of my plants soon.
Actually, I’ll head out there right now.
8 months ago

Jamin Grey wrote:My speculation is that after several years, the one in the tote will need watering, the ones in the ground won't, and the one in the tote will, due to limitation on root depth, not be able to produce as many consecutive harvesting of spears. I think it'll work but be less productive and need more watering.

I'd be very interested to hear how your experiment goes!



I’ll post some pictures in a couple months/weeks.

: )

It’s an Experiment!!! Hehehe!!!

=M=
9 months ago

Marco Banks wrote:The annual cycle of asparagus is about a month and a half of spears that are large enough to pick, and then 10+ months of it just growing or going dormant.  When the spears get small and spindly, you need to let the plant just do it's thing.  It becomes a big, tangled mess -- ferny branches going all over the place.  It's not a space-efficient plant, but rather, it consumes a lot of garden space as the asparagus fronds flop over and try to maximize exposure to the sun so it can create an energy reserve for next season.  So if you had a place to transport those planting boxes/barrels/containers for the majority of the year when the plant isn't bearing, yeah, a greenhouse might be a solution.  But don't count on picking a big bunch of asparagus and having a nice amount for a meal.  You'll get 2 spears today, none tomorrow, 1 spear the next day . . .  There are so many more efficient veggies to grow in a greenhouse than big, tangly asparagus plants.  For the small amount of asparagus you'll actually get for all your effort, I'd spend $5 at Costco and buy a bunch there.



What plants would you suggest to grow year round in a greenhouse?
So far I’ve decided on Everbearing/day neutral strawberries and a couple different kinds of tomatoes.

=M=

9 months ago
Thanks for the replies.

Well, now I’ll plant most of my crowns outside... and one in a tote in the greenhouse as an experiment...

I bought 10 medium crowns of asparabest variety today.

So, I’ll plant nine in a row, and one in a tote.

I’ll let you guys know how it goes in a month or two.

Thanks again for the replies.

=M=
9 months ago
Hi! I’m Mark.

I have a question for all you experts out there.

I have a heated Greenhouse, and I was wondering:

If I plant asparagus in a deep 3’x2’ tote with proper drainage holes in it, and keep the temperatures between 50’f and 80’f all year round; will I get continual harvests of asparagus throughout the year, or will they just flush one time in the spring?

Do they need to go dormant in order to produce like many fruit trees, or will they just keep on pumping out shoots???

Let me know what you think ASAP!!!

: )

Thanks in advance!

=M=
9 months ago
It does help.
Thanks again for all the priceless information: I appreciate you.

=M=
1 year ago
My “Flat Wonderful” peach tree.
It’s my favorite because it has purple-red leaves through most of the growing season; then later on in September the leaves start to turn dark green.
Plus, it produces flat peaches that look like doughnuts, or tires, or flying saucers, or what have you; furthermore, these peaches are super Juicy and Delicious!

I love this tree!!!

Would you believe I only planted it three years ago; and, when I got it, it was just a whip no taller than 1’ 6” and 1/4” wide?!?

I live in zone 5, and this is a cold hardy peach tree baby!

=M=
1 year ago