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John Saltveit

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since May 09, 2010
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John Saltveit currently moderates these forums:
Food forest in a suburban location. Teaches grafting and helps people learn how to grow food. Involved with a local food exchange group.  Shares cuttings and knowledge with schoolchildren.
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Recent posts by John Saltveit

William- You're right. They're great in oatmeal.  The tart flavor and red color perfectly complements the sturdy blandness of oats.
John S
PDX OR
6 hours ago
Yes, I agree with all above.
Chopping them up and mixing them with whatever I'm eating:lasagna, chilaquiles, beans, rice.
Adding chile, soy sauce, olive oil, vinegar, etc to the combo to make it just right.
Very bitter that year? Less dandelion, smaller pieces, other flavor combos to balance. 
I usually mix them in with other greens too, which balances the flavor: parsley, earth chestnut, scorzonera, many mallows, swiss chard, kale, leeks, false dandelion, plantain,e tc.
John S
PDX OR
12 hours ago
I think they're great in salads because they're SO pretty.  The flavor is dispersed so tart is balanced with bitter, etc.

They're also great in muffins and pancakes.

John S
PDX OR
14 hours ago
Stacy,
I agree that the building can be social, but afterwards, what? TO do it cheaply, sustainably, and simply, it kind of has to be in a fairly remote location.  Designing it for social interaction can solve that problem.  I like introverts, I'm married to one, but most people want social interaction.
John S
PDX OR
14 hours ago
I agree with TJ on the deep containers.  I have transplanted many pawpaws successfully.  Just make sure that your hole is deep and dug before you remove the pawpaw. Have all of your amendments ready. MOve it just after it wakes up in the Spring or before it goes to sleep in the Fall.  Place it in gently and water it and it should be ok.  Make sure to keep your paw paw seeds moist. Like citrus seeds, they are from places that get a lot of summer rain.  If they dry out, they won't germinate.  Apples are from dry summer places and so they can dry out, then germinate, but not so with Paw paws.
JohN S
PDX OR
14 hours ago
That's a great site, Peter!  THere is another village in Washington State in the East part of the Gorge, sort of near Klickitat.

I think it's helpful if people want to start that kind of natural building to know if there are other fun/cool people around to hang out with and do stuff with.

John S
PDX OR
17 hours ago
I think that what you're doing with the natural building is awesome.

It can be cheap, sustainable, low cost and fun.

I think the biggest drawback is the social aspects.

You can get cheap land and build your house in the middle of nowhere. Cheap house but bored. 

You can try to do that in a town but then you have regulations, higher cost, and you often can't get clay as cheaply.

Have you heard of movements to try to site a couple of cool towns near each other?

Near a smaller college town could work.

I live in the PNW and there is a lot of groove going on but there is also very expensive housing in cities like Portland and Seattle.

If people could have another natural building communiity a few miles away by bike or griesel bus they could have a better social life, play music, adventures, etc. 

Have you two heard of people trying to organize natural building communities for better social interaction?
Thanks,
John S
PDX OR
19 hours ago
Tim-
Wearing manufactured shoes is a recent phenomenon.  What do you think people did before they bought them?

Why do the world's greatest distance runners go without shoes?
JohN S
PDX OR
4 days ago
You'd better watch out- those hips are dangerous!
John S
PDX OR
5 days ago
I have been growing rugosa roses for about 20 years. They get no diseases here, smell great, and have small thorns and big hips!?!
Before, I had been growing native roses: huge giant sprawling plant with almost no flowers or hips and huge thorns-no thanks.
I eat some fresh, but I want to try the  process of separating the hips and seeds under unheated water.  I like the way people say they are the opposite of an orange:you keep the outside and throw out the inside.  I think I will try just drying them in the sun this year and see how that goes. It should kill fewer of the antioxidants and less vitamin C.  The hips are also beautiful.
John S
PDX OR
1 week ago