John Saltveit

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since May 09, 2010
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Food forest in a suburban location. Teaches grafting and helps people learn how to grow food. Involved with a local food exchange group.  Shares cuttings and knowledge with schoolchildren.
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Recent posts by John Saltveit

It heals on its own. Just bud graft it quickly.
John S
PDX OR
2 hours ago
Those look like good choices. New growth.  You can't save the leaf, but you can save the branch if you do it carefully.
John S
PDX OR
12 hours ago
Thanks Paul and Justin,
I haven't been out there for a few years due to children, work, etc.  It's great to catch up on what's been going on there.
John S
PDX OR
1 week ago
Sometimes with trees like that where I'm not sure if they can handle the drought, I might just give them one deep watering per month in the summer to encourage deep root growth.  Then I might just watch and wait. If they show no signs on the leaves of drying and withering, I don't water at all.
John S
PDX OR
1 week ago
I think it is drought tolerant when adult.  We are bone dry in July and August usually, and it is a common street tree here. Many are very old. 
John S
PDX OR USA
1 week ago
It was also more fun to read than a "textbook" kind of food forest book.  By giving all the crucial information through actual successful forest gardens themselves as well, you can imagine how your forest garden will come alive through their transformations.  Great job.
John S
PDX OR
2 weeks ago
Forest Gardening in Practice by Tomas Remiarz

I give this book 8.5 out of 10 acorns.
Tomas Remiarz is not just an ivory tower academic. He has been working in forest gardens and observing them for many years, mostly in Britain.  This book honors the forebears of food forest history and borrows ideas from them.  Remiarz looks into many of them and what they were trying to do.  There is some theory in here, but Remiarz acknowledges that most of that has been covered before. Most of the book focuses on examples of food forests in different location. What did they try to do in that specific climate? Where did they start from? What worked? What didn’t?
Remiarz lives in England, so most of the examples come from Britain.  There may be some terms that are unfamiliar to North Americans, such as tree onions and hedge garlic.  There are also examples of places in which you may not understand the specific climatological challenges if you can’t place Devon from Shropshire or Dorset. 
However, Remiarz explains the details of each site very well.  His writing style is clear.  He makes you want to go to each place and experience it.  The interaction of plants, weather and soil is intricately explained.  You can tell that he must be really great at running a forest garden in the way he explains the  interactions between plants, animals, and fungi.  He delves into some possible problems that can occur in forest gardens and interactions that are helpful as well as interesting.  He also expresses the joy that can come from people coming together in cooperative ways to establish and maintain a forest garden.  As a food forest owner myself, I not only enjoyed the book, but I also could have used it when I started mine. 

John S
PDX OR
2 weeks ago
I give this book 8.5 out of 10 acorns.
Tomas Remiarz is not just an ivory tower academic. He has been working in forest gardens and observing them for many years, mostly in Britain.  This book honors the forebears of food forest history and borrows ideas from them.  Remiarz looks into many of them and what they were trying to do.  There is some theory in here, but Remiarz acknowledges that most of that has been covered before. Most of the book focuses on examples of food forests in different location. What did they try to do in that specific climate? Where did they start from? What worked? What didn’t?
Remiarz lives in England, so most of the examples come from Britain.  There may be some terms that are unfamiliar to North Americans, such as tree onions and hedge garlic.  There are also examples of places in which you may not understand the specific climatological challenges if you can’t place Devon from Shropshire or Dorset. 
However, Remiarz explains the details of each site very well.  His writing style is clear.  He makes you want to go to each place and experience it.  The interaction of plants, weather and soil is intricately explained.  You can tell that he must be really great at running a forest garden in the way he explains the  interactions between plants, animals, and fungi.  He delves into some possible problems that can occur in forest gardens and interactions that are helpful as well as interesting.  He also expresses the joy that can come from people coming together in cooperative ways to establish and maintain a forest garden.  As a food forest owner myself, I not only enjoyed the book, but I also could have used it when I started mine. 
John S
PDX OR
2 weeks ago
These are great ideas for different scales of biochar.  I have been using the meat grinder. It is an effective method of grinding it to a kind of coarse sand texture, which is much better than the gravel that I was getting with the giant mortar and pestal version I was using earlier.  I am intrigued by the plywood boards in the driveway to see how that will work, but I'm going to have to talk to the boss first.
JOhn S
PDX OR
2 weeks ago
I wandered around a couple of counties in E.  Oregon that are supposed to have the invasive woad problem while camping, but I couldn't find any.  I think it sometimes takes a while to get used to the regular plants in an area, then after awhile, you can pick out your intended foraged target.  I am sure that eventually I will find it. I might try to grow it meanwhile from seeds.  We have very acidic natural soil here, and it likes neutral to alkali soils. 
John S
PDX OR
2 weeks ago