Suzie Browning

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since Jun 10, 2010
Southwestern Ohio
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Recent posts by Suzie Browning

Can anyone tell me how flame weeding along a welded wire fence will affect the fence itself? Will it shorten the fence's lifespan?
6 years ago

jbreezy McCoy wrote:Most of the time the default to thinking that the food is organic or at least treated differently then what they get at the grocery store.



This is very common where I live. People automatically assume that if it is grown by someone local, it's organic. I'm very vocal about my practices and try to educate others enough that they will start to ask other growers.

There is a small farm near me that used to be certified organic and dropped it because of the cost. They have no trouble selling their product without any certification. Yup, "know your grower" makes all the difference in the world in these parts.
6 years ago
I can't answer your question but your post title reminded me of a quote I recently ran across and I wanted to share.

"There is enough in the world for everyone's need, but not enough for everyone's greed." ~ Frank Buchman
6 years ago

John Crawford wrote:Onion Jam.

It should also be noted that it's not going to be as thick as regular jam due to not having allot of pectin.



You could try Pomona's Universal Pectin. (www.pomonapectin.com) I love this stuff for two reasons. 1. I can make my own recipes using any type and amount of sweetener I want. 2. It never expires.
6 years ago
Not a major, but the University of North Carolina offers a course, Intro to Permaculture http://online.northcarolina.edu/course.php?id=13319

A while back there was a thread on here to videos online taped from that class.  I've watch about half of them so far. If you do a search, you might be able to find it.
6 years ago
Try searching for plants with the word Fire in the common name.  This seems/looks familiar to me and the word Fire is what popped into my head.
6 years ago
If I knew I was going to have to leave, I'd just use containers that would leave with me.
6 years ago
This is what I read from the "Permaculture Techniques" pdf download from Permaculture.org.  (http://www.permaculture.org/nm/images/uploads/Permaculture_Techniques.pdf)

White mulberry as chicken forage is as good as a double crop of grain. It is 17% protein. The mulberry crop is a very good chicken food for the period of bearing in which it occurs, and beyond it; because the chickens are getting seed long after the mulberries are gone.



I assumed he was talking about the fruit as I don't normally think about the chickens eating the leaves.  Do you know of anyone who has attempted to feed them dry leaves (whole, crushed, powdered?) in the winter (perhaps mixed with something else)?

Last year I froze mulberries to feed in the winter but with the small crop I had this year I won't be able to.  Looks like it would have been better  (more nutritious) to dry them instead. 

I am raising meal worms to replace the mulberries this winter. Permaguy, have you considered adding meal worms or other insects to your tool?

6 years ago
Ah, it didn't cross my mind you were talking dry. 
6 years ago
I read this thread a couple of days ago and kept thinking to myself, but don't mulberries have 17% protein?

I finally found a reference on permacultre.org where Bill Mollison states White Mulberry is 17% Protein.  Is this just white mulberries or am I misreading the data you've show?

Edited to add: Permaguy, I ment to say, I like the tool you making.
6 years ago