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This thread is all about Resilient Seeds




Who We Are
Resilient Seeds is a one-woman operation, a labor of love, a search for sustainability, and a desire to do work that is connected to the earth in a good way. My name is Krista Rome, I was born in Bellingham, Washington, and I, like any other human, am constantly searching for my truth. I possess an Aquarian spirit of doing things because they feel right and not because they are profitable, so farming is perhaps a natural place for me to have ended up. My path in life has brought me through several careers, all with a focus on sustainability. When I started farming, I had to start driving my vehicles a lot more, but began contributing to the improvement of our local food system. That trade-off helped me recognize that every decision in our lives involves some sort of compromise, but I do my best to make choices that nurture the environment the best I can. I apply that philosophy to my farm and seed company, always investigating what more I can do to improve my practices to minimize any harm to climate, soil, insects, people, wildlife, and habitat. It’s a never-ending journey, and it's a joyful one.

What We Do
The formative years of what has grown into Resilient Seeds were spent trailing cool climate grains and dry legumes and educating other homesteaders and farmers on growing their own. I called that the Backyard Beans & Grains Project and still consider that work an important part of the Resilient Seeds mission.

But seed growing is addictive, and I wanted to offer other seeds that contribute to a year-round local pantry and also those with good genetic diversity so that you can select and adapt resilient varieties for your own unique climate and conditions. Working with a wider variety of promising crops feeds into a broader vision of true food resiliency on a community scale.

Running a seed business is a year-round operation; I don't stop to rest in winter, I just come inside for a few months. I farm one acre, with a wide diversity of seed crops, traditional storage crops, and fall & winter vegetables for the local farmers market. The field season starts in early March in the seedling house and ends in November in the barn as we finish cleaning the last seed lots and shelling the grain corn. In December it is full-on with germination tests, website updates, farm clean-up, and wrapping up the late season farmers market. In January the seed orders start coming and the focus for the next few months is on packaging seeds and mailing orders. I sell most of the seed online, with a targeted audience of Pacific Northwest growers, but an actual customer base of all over the country and the world. I also sell wholesale seed on contract to other regional seed companies, including Bountiful Gardens, Uprising Seeds, and Siskiyou Seeds. I really do love the year-round farm business, as each season is different and special in its own way.

About our seeds
All of our seeds are open-pollinated, Non-GMO, and grown using "beyond" organic methods. We received official USDA Organic Certification in August, 2015. All seeds not indicated as "Certified Organic" were grown following organic standards but prior to our applying for certification. Many of our seeds are heirloom varieites that have stood the test of time.  Many more are newer varieties bred under organic conditions by regional independent seed breeders. We are a member of the Open Source Seed Network, so we have pledged to keep these independent breeders' varieties safe from patenting and available to everyone (www.osseed.org). You will also find  a few "modern land races" (genetically diverse varieties) and variety mixes that offer you the opportunity to become a seed-adaptor/breeder yourself: just grow these out year after year and save seed from the plants that do best under your specific growing conditions.  

We grow 100% of the seed we offer, so we have firsthand, detailed knowledge about each crop and each variety. All of our seed exceeds federal germination standards and is tested on a yearly basis. Basic growing instructions are included with each packet. For more details on growing dry beans and grains, download our free pdfs from the Growing Guides tab.  

​Unlike seed companies that sell hybrids (which need to be purchased every year), we hope that our customers will learn to save their own seed and share it with their friends and neighbors.



Ships internationally

http://www.resilient-seeds.com
COMMENTS:
 
gardener
Posts: 1365
Location: Middle Tennessee
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I give this seed source 9 out of 10 acorns

I love small, independent seed companies, and here's another one that I've purchased seed from. I didn't discover Resilient Seeds until fall of 2016, and wish I had known about them sooner. In the spring of 2017 I grew the Blooming Prairie snap bean, with very good results in my southern climate. A short bushing variety with beautiful purple bean pods, the bushes blossom abundantly resulting in quite an ample harvest for the six bushes I grew. Germination success was high in my case, with all twelve seeds sown germinating and then culling to six plants. These snap beans are delicious and my wife and I munched on them often during the summer.

I certainly recommend this seed company!
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Posts: 16
Location: Boston Mountains, NW Arkansas
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I also wish I had discovered Resilient Seeds sooner. I'm trying several varieties this year including Swedish Red pole peas, a highly productive soup pea.
 
Weeds: because mother nature refuses to be your personal bitch. But this tiny ad is willing:
Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
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