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Chicken manure and mulch

 
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My wife has a condition that is made much worse with chicken manure or any exposure to chicken droppings, bedding, etc.  I've had them rooting in the compost pile since I moved it next to their coop.  She is very worried about using the compost for the garden due to the manure and exposure to the chickens.  Does anyone know how long before chicken manure breaks down so it is not active anymore?  She doesn't want anything to do with the compost which is awesome and rich, but can't be used now.  
 
pollinator
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Michael,

your question seems to be how long would it take for your wife to not react to some unspecified component of the chicken manure, based on a reaction that is not described. Can you provide any other data?
 
pollinator
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One full year of composting detoxifies a lot of things. In this case that would mean one full year from removing from the chickens.

Another thought. In Will Bonsall's gardening book he explains how he uses Humanure to fertilize corn and squash by digging a deep trench and burying well composted humanure compost.

Handling your chicken compost like Will handles his Humanure would be considerate. Corn would be an excellent choice because the edible part, the cob, is far off the ground.

So my thought is: compost it another year, then bury it in trenches under your 2020 corn patch.

Speaking as someone who misses having chickens, are you sure you can keep a flock around with her allergy getting this bad? Maybe you could pass them on to another permie nearby?
 
Michael McKay
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"your question seems to be how long would it take for your wife to not react to some unspecified component of the chicken manure, based on a reaction that is not described. Can you provide any other data?"

She learned that she has inflammatory muscle neuropathy.  Basically think of MS and you'll get an idea of what it is.  Some component in manure, dust of the coop, or whatever, made her lungs really inflamed and reduced her lung capacity severely.  It is already compromised due to her muscle weakness.  Once she stopped being around the chickens, the lung inflammation stopped.  It is some kind of inflammatory reaction which is making her very sick so I am taking care of the chickens now and she just watches them from afar.  
 
Tj Jefferson
pollinator
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Michael,

This is a maybe answer, but I would say the visible manure should be gone and worked in, then the clock starts. For heavy manuring, you probably need a year. I can still see visible manure if the mulch is thick before than frame, but it depends on the rate of decompostition and incorporation. Super vibrant composting will shrink that, and would probably be like humanure rules.

It could be mold or fungal reaction, in which case this is a byproduct of decomposition regardless of chickens, or it could be ammonia, in which case dilution in chips should be the answer and quickly resolve.
 
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Always wear a dust mask when cleaning out the coop. This includes everyone, not just the OP and his wife.

There's a known condition, bird fancier's lung. It occurs in people who keep birds, not just chickens, but a wide variety of birds. I have known people who had to give up their birds as a result.

I do not know if there is any "safe" period of time for composting chicken manure when the person suffers from bird fancier's lung.

en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bird_fancier%27s_lung

Best wishes on this, but it may come down to re-homing the birds.
 
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