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Hackberry trees possible grafting candidates

 
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I am blessed (or cursed) with an abundance of hackberry trees on my farm.  Unfortunately they are quite susceptible to the wooly aphid and become quite messy when everything under them get covered in black sooty mold.  Not a threat to the tree but very messy.  What I was wondering is it possible to graft another tree that is not as susceptible to the wooly aphids and reduce the problems they cause.  It is a novel approach but I will not use chemicals and don;t want to cut them down if I don't have to...
Does anyone know of possible candidates for grafting onto them.

Thanks
 
pollinator
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Location: East tn
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What is the fruit/nut like on your tree?

Sugarberry is same family and fruit skin covered nuts are edible and nutritious.

These types of trees can be coppicced so the fruit is at a level to be harvested.

Might be important to slowly test your trees, one tree, one limb, cod weather, right moon phase, etc

The native Americans used the fruit/nut in pemmican and when dehydrated, it stores well.
 
John Tietjen
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I wonder if they are susceptible to the woolly aphid like my species.    
 
gardener
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Celtis occidentalis is a member of the Elm family and is now part of the Cannabaceae genus so if you want to do something really unique you could graft some hops to your hackberry trees.

Redhawk
 
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