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City/County codes and permaculture

 
Paul Cereghino
gardener
Posts: 855
Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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The City of Olympia Council is discussing revisions to city code, policy and programs to encourage food production as an urban land use next Monday evening. 

Any ideas out there on creative ways through incentives, regulation, code changes, zoning changes etc... that a sovereign city can improve the quality of its food system?

Any examples folks can point to to other such efforts outside the NW?
 
Benjamin Burchall
Posts: 182
Location: Long Beach, CA
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Cities can give property owners a property tax credit for growing food whether in ground or in containers. A greater tax credit can be given for those who generate income through their efforts. They may have to change zoning to allow for market gardens on residential property. A municipal composting facility can recycle organic waste and sell it at cost to the urban growers.

Cities can create jobs by paying urban farmers who live in the city to raise food on school property. The funds being spent to purchase food from vendors can pay the farmers' salaries. This could be done at any municipal facility that has land or other space for container gardens and purchases food.

Heck, I've got a whole program I'm working on formalizing for Atlanta that a city could implement and spur the local economy while localizing it's food. I'd be happy to talk to you about it. Perhaps you could present it to your city council if you like it.
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Kay Bee
Posts: 471
Location: Jackson County, OR (Zone 7)
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There was  a book I came across at the library > 10 years ago  published back in the late 70's/early 80's that I think was called "Edible City" based around a coalition in Eugene, OR.  It looks like there is a book with that title now on Amazon regarding a project in Toronto, so I may be off a bit on the name.

It was a very "homemade" feeling book, but it had a lot of insights in to how a city could truly be made in to a productive and healthy environment.

This site has a mention of the Edible City Resource Center, which if I recall was a sponsored site where people could come for free and learn about composting, vermiculture, growing veg/fruit/nuts and get classes in food storage, like canning. 
http://www.lanefood.org/about-wffc.php

I see there is a manual on Amazon, as well.  This may be the actual book that I came across.
http://www.amazon.com/Edible-Resource-Manual-Richard-Britz/dp/0913232971/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1316878150&sr=8-1

May be worth looking in to if you really have a chance to make some progress at the city gov level.
 
Paul Cereghino
gardener
Posts: 855
Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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That's great... I actually have a copy of the edible city I picked up at  used book store in the early 1990!  I'll revisit it.
 
                                
Posts: 17
Location: Western Washington, USA
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The  Stevens County Assembly passed a Food Freedom ordinance this summer.

http://www.stevenscountyassembly.com/blog-entry/farm/food-freedom-ordinance-final
 
2017 Appropriate Technology Course at Wheaton Labs http://richsoil.com/pdc
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