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wild morning glory erradication

 
                    
Posts: 14
Location: Milwaukee, WI
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Urban garden with two areas being overwhelmed by morning glory.  both areas are on fences but in one the morning glory has been suffocating a raspberry patch and a rose bush, in the other the only plant is a chokeberry bush that has been latched onto albeit less than the rampage on the raspberries.

Looking for a permaculture answer to the problem; I've heard these can be a serious problem to get rid of.  I am in the midwest and the season here is just about over anyhow, but wondering if there is something I should be doing now or things to plan on for next spring.

Thanks in advance for any help.

-Ryan
 
Posts: 225
Location: Adelaide, South Australia (Mediterranean climate)
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I assume you are talking about Convolvulus arvensis here.

There are mites which can be released on the plant that retard its growth.  There are also people who have done it with a 2-3 year rotation of plants like pumpkins and grasses.  This is probably easier in a field situation than an urban situation.  Paul's preferred method involves pulling the stems of the plant out repeatedly, starting by clearing a small area and then expanding the area gradually which is kept cleared of the weed.

I have resorted to methods that would not be considered permaculture but appear to be effective so far with relatively low effort.  I suspect the difficulty of removal probably depends quite strongly on how much it likes your climate.  Here it dies back over winter, but we have fairly short mild winters (no frosts), so quite a long growing season allows the plant to vigorously expand further each year, even with attempts to check its growth.
 
Posts: 520
Location: Eastern Kansas
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Morning glories LOVE it here!

The only way I got rid of mine was to switch my garden spot, at which time they became more managable.

Morning glories do NOT like being mowed every week and my lawn is relatively free. That makes me suspect that pulling the same plants repeatedly would work but I have not tried it as I moved my vegetable garden. The basic idea is, you spend 5 minutes pulling morning glory in one area. Then, the next day you again spend 5 minutes pulling morning glory, STARTING IN THE SPOT YOU PULLED YESTERDAY! This exhausts the root and the plant becomes weak and eventually dies.

I have not tried it as I moved my garden before I heard of it, but morning glory does not do wello in a lawn that gets mowed every week: it usually dies. My old garden space is now just grass and trees.

I hate those cheerfull white flowers!
 
                    
Posts: 14
Location: Milwaukee, WI
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Thanks guys I guess it's gonna just be a lot of pulling up.  Hopefully if I get the buggers weak enough before the winter comes it will be easier to deal with next season.
 
Hugh Hawk
Posts: 225
Location: Adelaide, South Australia (Mediterranean climate)
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Some sources say that the plant is most vulnerable in autumn when it is storing its reserves for next season in its roots.  So it's definitely worth a try now to weaken it.
 
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