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Nigerian dwarf goat questions?

 
Posts: 44
Location: Central Pa
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Now that spring is rolling around I am picking up on last years project building a goat paddock but due to the overly wet rain all last year I didn't get the paddock even started. I had plans to install post and woven wire fence and a small shed/ milking parlor. I have been looking at other homesteaders that have videos and one I follow has a few does with kids in a rather small paddock maybe 25*25 and a shed for them and the fencing is cattle panels over woven wire and is secured to T post not wooden post. I was under the impression that weld wire was useless as the welds would give and T post wouldn't be ideal. I Also was surprised at the size of a few paddocks I had seen I figured they would need more room. When we had goats growing up they always were moved around the farm to eat the weeds and grass and had rather large areas to graze so I was unsure of the area needed per goat. Lots of information online but lots of it says one thing and the next is completely different.
 
Posts: 37
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Everyone seems to have their own magic formula that works for them. A lot of personal information and choices go into this question: type of land, climate, how much I am willing to hand feed them verses letting them graze, and so on. I've raised Nigerian dwarf, and they do take less area just because of their smallness compared to other goats. I used welded wire and T post with good success, however I placed my post different then most people do. Every other post was on a different side of the fence (One on the inside, next one on the outside. ) My reasoning behind this was goats climb and push on fences and this method supports the fence better from both sides. It helps to keep them from walking down a fence.

I actually like calf hutches, because of the size, easy mobility, and you can clean them well if you get into a situation where you had a sick animal in them. Also it you have several then the "boss" can't  control all the shelter entrances.  However these do not make good milking parlors. ;)

One suggestion I did follow, sorry can't remember anymore where I read it to give credit to, was to cut two 16 foot welded wire panels in half, then attach them together so they form a square with one corner easy to open. Now you have a moveable pen for your goats. The eight foot square is suppose to help deter birds of prey from wanting to land inside that small area and take off with a young one. This pen saw lots of use. It is much easier to move with two people, but when there is a will you find a way.
 
hunter miller
Posts: 44
Location: Central Pa
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were you using only T post I was thinking of using wooden for the corners and T in between but that would be a permanent pen instead of one I can move through out the yard about 2 acres. An as far as the weld wire you were using fencing or the cattle panels that come in sections?
 
Liza Stallsmith
Posts: 37
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I used the panels. I think I've got some of every kind they make. lol But the cost for them has gone way up, however the very first ones I have bought are still in use and going strong. Wooden corner braces would be nice for a permit pen though I didn't do mine that way. The other kind of fence that I would highly recommend would be the no climb horse fence. I used it around my garden because we live back in and my goats and sheep get let out in the yard at times to keep it "mowed."
 
Liza Stallsmith
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Oh, all the fencing posts on my place the way I told you no matter what type of fence. Often I have animals on both sides of it.
 
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