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Propagation advice- Amelanchier, serviceberries

 
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I am attempting to propagate some service berries from dormant cuttings.

I dipped the bottoms in aloe prior to sticking them into soil.

I kept them in their own little pots with bags over the top of them for about a week.

Is it safe to remove the bag from the top of the pots at this stage of growth?

Any advice moving forward would be appreciated!

All currently have 2-3 leaf buds like the one in the picture.

840BB3BF-0ED2-44CB-9D3C-F1E6033B89BE.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 840BB3BF-0ED2-44CB-9D3C-F1E6033B89BE.jpeg]
 
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Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Are these indoors? in a green house? outside on a patio?

With it still being early spring you will want to consider last frost dangers when wanting to remove their protective cover.

If you were in southern California, or anywhere along the gulf coast I would say yes it is safe to remove those covers.
Anywhere else, check to determine when there will definitely not be a possibility of frost.
Right now those are tender young shoots, treat them like the babies they are and you will do fine.

If you have them in a protected area that frost can't get to them, remove the cover from the branch but leave the soil covered to retain the moisture so you don't need to worry about it drying out and them dying of thirst.

Redhawk
 
Andy James
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:Are these indoors? in a green house? outside on a patio?



Ope, that all seems very important.


They are indoors. I started them in an east facing window, and moved them to a south facing window yesterday. I don’t plan on taking them outside for about a month or so (Michigan- US).

I’ll take your advice in your last sentence. Would you recommend covering the pot with same plastic bag, or throwing some mulch on top of the soil to retain moisture? Is it important for the soil to be able to have some air at this point?

Thanks!
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Since they at indoors I'd just use mulch instead of plastic and yes it is important for air to get to the roots. The plants look  like they are going to do quite well by the way.

Redhawk
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