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Broadforks

 
                    
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How many of you use a broadfork?  Can any of you share your thoughts or experience with this tool?
I am thinking of investing in one.  The model manufactured by Meadow Creatures looks quite sturdy.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9435
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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I used to use one and I loved it!  But I'm not using it presently because the garden I'm working with now has buried logs and sticks in it.

 
George Lee
Posts: 539
Location: Athens, GA/Sunset, SC
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Get one. It should be a staple for each farmer who believes in pre- and one day "post-carbon" tools. Gardener and farmer alike shouldn't be without one.
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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The broadfork is not a tool for creating good tilth, but is essential for maintaining it.
It is a good, non-destructive way to loosen and mix garden soils, but is not "powerful" enough to convert dirt into soil.
 
Ivan Weiss
Posts: 176
Location: Vashon WA, near Seattle and Tacoma
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Yes! Do it! I use the Meadow Creature broadfork, manufactured right here on Vashon Island WA by my friend Bob Powell. Bob's broadfork is a great tool for hand clearing, well balanced and ergonomic. If, for example, you are trying to clear blackberries in an area where you can't run hogs, the broadfork will be your best friend. Highly recommended.
 
Jack Shawburn
Posts: 230
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I made one with 6 - 14" flat tines cut from 1/4" Steel plate.
The handles are over 5feet tall so it has great leverage.

I prepare the soil only once with it.
It is a bit slow on hard soil but easier on the back.

We put down, compost, some rock dust, maybe kelp, soaked char, little granite dust and matured manure if needed. Sometimes bonemeal too.

The soil is just broken through the added amendments
It is then watered, mulched and left to the earthworms
to create tilth, mix all and improve fertility.
We keep thick mulch over it as much as possible.
 
2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
http://richsoil.com/pdc
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