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How much sunlight for Philippine greenhouse....balancing solar panels with clear roof

 
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Hello group,

 We are building a needed extension for our sewing studio.  Plan was to put a 5x9 foot cutting table in it but that went wrong (not enough room) so now we are building an extension to the extension.  The idea is to make most of this extension a Philippine style greenhouse.  In other words we don't need to enclose it for heating purposes like in Northern Europe but instead it will be screened on one side and a roof over it.  The other side is the side of our house.  We want to use a clear(ish) corrugated fiberglass roofing material but also want to put our extra solar panels that are in storage up there. on the sides will be plant stands.  I asked around and nobody really seems to know.  What percentage of clear(ish) exposed fiberglass corrugated roof panels to solar panels (which will effectively block the sunlight)?  Not allot of light will come through the side so I can't really count on that.  Should it be 50/50 solar panels to roof allowing sunlight?  I know this is really broad like maybe the type of plant will determine the answer.  We would like to grow tomatoes or maybe something else that looks good but can be eaten.   Suggestions regarding a hardy but healthy/edible that can handle the lower light would also be really helpful.  

Best regards and advanced thanks, Mike
 
pollinator
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Hi, can you expound a bit more? what do you mean by "Philippine Greenhouse"? Over the decades here in the Manila suburbs, we've tried various plastic roofing sheets, fiberglass, and polycarbonate but they always leak after a few strong typhoons. In my opinion, GI (yero) is still best beneath pv panels, and most other roofing applications here (easy to patch with vulcaseal).

We would like to grow tomatoes or maybe something else that looks good but can be eaten.   Suggestions regarding a hardy but healthy/edible that can handle the lower light would also be really helpful.


Is there any reason why you'd like a greenhouse for your edibles? My herbs, tomatoes, eggplants, squash (kalabasa), and a few other edibles are in full sun - they hardly ever do well in partial shade.
 
Mike Kendall
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Hello,  We have lots of panels installed successfully already.  We will make a structure of rectangular tubing (and angle iron where needed) for the roof and have done this already with no problems using a mix of corrugated fiberglass that is semi clear and a supporting structure of rectangular tubing  in a different area that easily supports the weight of the panels and roof.  Currently we have an excess of 3 dozen panels still not installed after other completed projects.  2 dozen will go on our second carport we are building now (first carport already covered in 2 dozen panels).  The last dozen we will put on top of this screened enclosure as well as potentially the top of the studio extension (which is corrugated GI).  This screened in area  is going to be approximately 15ft x 21ft in area adjoining the studio extension which is 12ft x 15ft.  It borders the front wall/fence and part of our house.  We have zero room left on all four sides for any more panels of the roofing structure of the house (approaching 3000 sq ft) so this might as well be the place to put the last dozen panels (with space for sunlight to enter in between).  Intention is to be able to put a very large table structure inside in the center and plants on each side of that along the length.  On our front terrace it is similar in that we have screened in and put plants but those are just for decoration.  We want to be able to put a plant type that will thrive in the lower light level than full sunlight and this time I'm interested in finding something that is edible instead of more plants that require attention with zero return other than they look good.  I posted this in gardening for beginners as I am exactly that maybe even a level below beginner.  So to sum it up I'm looking for recommended plants that can be used in salad or soup that will thrive on the lesser level of light and a recommendation of percentage of coverage that I can get by with (on panels) that will still allow enough light through for growing the plants.  From your response it sounds like tomatoes are not an option.  My background leans towards electrical engineering so this is new to me.  Best regards, Mike
 
pusang halaw
pollinator
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Mike Kendall wrote:I posted this in gardening for beginners as I am exactly that maybe even a level below beginner


Everyone started that way so Congratulations in taking the first steps!

Most indoor growers i know are succulent/cacti enthusiasts/sellers. You can use your greenhouse as a nursery for seedling trays, hydro/aqua ponics, and as sanctuary for your outdoor container plants in severe weather. Besides, most tropical fruit and veg thrive best in in full sun so take advantage of our sunny weather now. Pretty soon rains will come and by the second half of July, typhoons will arrive in rapid succession.
 
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