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Leah Sattler
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alright, so sometimes I get in a not so creative mood and get pretty starved for ideas so lets hear what you are eating!

tonite for me- pinto beans, acorn squash and fried cabbage w/mushrooms. a weirdish meal even by my standards. but it was good and my tummy is full so thats what counts.
 
Gwen Lynn
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I would eat that! It sounds good.

We had cold shrimp w/cocktail sauce & purple hull peas with green chilies & bacon. Kind of a weird combo, but it was easy & filled us up! Had the peas for good luck in 2009.

Happy New Year to all!
 
Leah Sattler
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uh oh! I forgot about the whole good luck thing I had better make some black eyed peas tonite or do you think beans would do the trick in a mexican inspired casserole
 
Gwen Lynn
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Ya know, I never heard about that -black eyed peas for good luck- thing until I moved to the south. Didn't ever eat them when I lived in IL, but now I figure "when in Rome", etc. Besides, my good friend "the goat herder" got me into eating them & now I like them a lot! (I never really ate them before...thanks goat-herder! )

But back to life up north, in my family we always had pickled herring on New Years. I don't know if it was for good luck but it could have been. That's where the tradition may have started.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur toxin-ectomy
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You know what I'm craving? I have these wonderful delicata squashes, a really hearty brown/red/wild rice mix, so I want to make stuffed squash with the rice, sauteed mushrooms, carrots, onions, and either nuts or sausage. I'm leaning toward sausage. Yum!

I'm also craving colcannon - mashed potatoes with kale and leeks, with a mound of caramelized onions in the middle. It takes kind of a while to prepare, but talk about winter comfort food!
 
Leah Sattler
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oooh that sounds good jocelyn! I am gonna have to make that one of these nights!

its my b-day and that means whatever I want for dinner. so I am making homemade chicken soup just like every year!

I just made fresh pasta and the stock is simmering on the stove. I'm drooling. now all I have to do is run to the store for my shameless treat.....jack and coke. well not shameless. but my shame doesn't stop me

 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Location: Missoula, MT
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books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur toxin-ectomy
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Belated Happy Birthday, Leah!! 

Gosh, your noodles look beautiful and that rack looks just perfect for drying them! I love homemade noodles. And did you sign the purchase agreement on your home on your birthday?? Been watching that thread and wishing you the best there, too.
 
Leah Sattler
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thanks jocelyin and yes we did!

I was going to have pork chops from our home raised pigs last night.....set them on the counter came back a few minutes later and they were gone.....the dogs had pork chops for dinner 
 
                              
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Oh my gosh those noodles look wonderful.  We're having taco soup for dinner tonight. 
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur toxin-ectomy
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Welcome, Toni! I don't think I've ever heard of taco soup. Is it like tortilla soup?
 
Leah Sattler
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mmm taco soup. I suppose everybody makes things different. ground beef and chicken With taco seasoning is so versatile. taco salad, taco casserole, taco soup, taco mac and cheese.

we had shepards pie last nite. somehow I can't make that without making a huge amount it filled my giant cast iron skillet to the brim
 
Gwen Lynn
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I'm at my sis-in-law's (sil?) mountain cabin in NE Georgia. It's beautiful here. We had a "low country boil" last nite. Shrimp, sausage, corn boiled in some Old Bay Seasoning. It was such a beatiful evening, we ate outside. Tonite we're having rotisserie chicken. It's soooooo nice to have someone else do the cooking. What a luxury!
 
Leah Sattler
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yum. i have been craving crab so we might have a bit of a 'boil' ourselves this weekend...... if I can rustle up any crab in fort smith 
 
                              
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We had chicken breast cooked in olive oil with cajun seasoning on it and a great big green salad.  I can't wait till this week end to cook outside on the grill. 
 
Dave Boehnlein
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I don't know if you're the type to use cookbooks, but this winter I picked one up and every single recipe I've made from it has been excellent. It is the Smith & Hawken Gardener's Community Cookbook (http://www.amazon.com/Smith-Hawken-Gardeners-Community-Cookbook/dp/0761117431) & you can pick up a dirt cheap used copy.

The cool thing is that the book is focused largely on foods you would grow in your garden or buy at a local farmer's market (parsnips, turnips, kale, etc.). My favorite recipes so far are the red pepper stuffed eggplants, the shittake & asparagus flan, and the fennel & pine nut apple crisp. The interns here at the farm approve as well!

Dave
 
gary gregory
Posts: 395
Location: northern california, 50 miles inland from Mendocino, zone 7
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arugula!

Its okay, I'm from california!   Cool spring, its the best crop I've ever had.   Big arugula salad with a little red leaf lettuce thrown in.  Basalmic vinegar, olive oil and garlic dressing.   And Marie Callenders frozen turkey pot pies.   
 
Leah Sattler
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gary wrote:
arugula!

Its okay, I'm from california!  Cool spring, its the best crop I've ever had.  Big arugula salad with a little red leaf lettuce thrown in.  Basalmic vinegar, olive oil and garlic dressing.  And Marie Callenders frozen turkey pot pies.   


shame on you  how can you eat those pot pies? bleche! do you need to come over for some real home cooking? 

salad yummy.

and I confess........I eat store pizzas.......always doctored up with extra vegies, especially artchokes and peppers but still....
 
gary gregory
Posts: 395
Location: northern california, 50 miles inland from Mendocino, zone 7
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Leah Sattler wrote:
shame on you  how can you eat those pot pies? bleche! do you need to come over for some real home cooking? 


It was just one of those nights where our brains were fried from the day's activities and it had to be simple and quick.    Tonight is tri-tip from last summer's 4H auction.     [and more salad]
 
          
Posts: 20
Location: Northern Calif.
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Tonight I'm making slow roasted veggies ( Bok Choy , Yu Choy ,Red Onion , Mushrooms , Carrots , Red Potatos , Brocolli , Sweet Potatos , Garlic , Ginger ,  Salt / Pepper) and chicken thighs on cast iron griddles in the oven along with a pineapple upside down cake made in a cast iron skillet....... hopefully my wife will approve when she gets home from work.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
master steward
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Location: Missoula, MT
389
books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur toxin-ectomy
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Boy, I'd sure approve Al! Nice.
 
Leah Sattler
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me too! I'm impressed. my dh used to make dinner when i was working late but it was usually hamburger helper  ........not that I am biting the hand that fed me......it was really and truly appreciated.

there are certainly days for simple. I think tonight I will make my version of hash. sausage and black eyed peas. I usually toss in some green chilis and onions. very filling. very cheap (I just blew all my money on goats :roll and pretty tasty too.
 
          
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I thank you guys for the kind words.

Leah , please forgive me for intruding but was curious about your goats. Stock for a farm ? or freezer ?......
 
Leah Sattler
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thats weird. I posted and poof. it was gone.

are you asking whether I eat them? yes. I have focused mainly on grain free breeding stock until recently. now I have more land and can actually start to generate more stock meant for the end meat market, including my own freezer. up until now it has just been a few wethers sold for meat or going in my freezer. but now all I need is some more fence to turn them out and let them grow on what they can scrounge up. sacked feeds and hay makes for expensive meat.

the meat is very good. it is super lean and not terribly well suited to fast cooking. the back strap is the exception I have found. otherwise I do roasts and stew meat and when cooked like that tastes just like beef to me. I have only eaten wethers under a year old though. I have two does that will be off to freezer camp in a few weeks that are a little older (Still young though- 14 months or so) and I am interested to see if there is a difference
 
Gwen Lynn
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The same disappearing post poof has happened to me. I dunno what to make of it!
 
          
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Location: Northern Calif.
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Ahh lucky you..... I live in the suburbs and dont have the room for livestock.

I have only had goat meat twice in my life ..... both were in stews ..... had a different sort of flavor but did make for some good eating.
My wife's cousin had obtained it and his wife cooked it up...... going to have to check into their source and see what is available...... sounds like something that a Dutch Oven would cook up nicely.
 
Gwen Lynn
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AL, I'm in the burbs too. Maybe someday get a little land. Fingers crossed. Would definitely like more room between neighbors. This 'hood is getting old fast. 
 
          
Posts: 20
Location: Northern Calif.
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Gwen Lynn ,

  Ya , Here in the Bay Area where I am at there just isn't much land that can be had at a reasonable cost. I live in a small unincorperated village in a house built in the early 1950's  but still neighbors are right next to each other.Hopefully someday I could get some land but it would have to be somewhere else...... to expensive here.

hmmm I just noticed that I had updated my profile to show my location but it's not there..... I must have made some mistake.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
master steward
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Location: Missoula, MT
389
books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur toxin-ectomy
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Hi AL,

It's odd, but the location field doesn't show up on folks' posts. There is a different field you can use for this.

To get your location to show up under your name, go to:
*account
*forum profile information
*personal text - enter your location here; I typed "Western WA."

I feel the suburban thing - am there myself - in a condo no less! 
 
          
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Location: Northern Calif.
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Jocelyn Campbell wrote:
Hi AL,

It's odd, but the location field doesn't show up on folks' posts. There is a different field you can use for this.

To get your location to show up under your name, go to:
*account
*forum profile information
*personal text - enter your location here; I typed "Western WA."

I feel the suburban thing - am there myself - in a condo no less! 


Thank You Jocelyn Campbell , I appreciate your help !!
 
gary gregory
Posts: 395
Location: northern california, 50 miles inland from Mendocino, zone 7
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I had a Latino friend many years ago and one night when I stopped by his house he asked me if I would like a bite to eat before going out to the bar.  I said sure and he pulled some cheese and flour tortillas from the fridge, turned on a burner on his gas stove and threw a flour tortilla on the flames until it started smoking and then turned it over and charred the other side!  I said,"Rueben, why are you burning that tortilla like that?"  He responded without hesitatation or turning around,  "It reminds me of my mother's cooking!" 
    It was very hard to keep back the laughter, but over the years I have found that the charred flavor really adds something to the burrito.  So tonight it is 'burritos a la Rueben'  Saut'ed  onions from last summer's garden,  broccoli, carrots, cabbage, lightly cooked and slightly crunchy, and pork from leftover country spareribs.  Lots of spices and tapatio with slices of avacado on top.   
 
Leah Sattler
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AL wrote:
Ahh lucky you..... I live in the suburbs and dont have the room for livestock.



if you are really interested you could raise quail fairly easily in the burbs. or rabbits. some people keep a few hens of a quiet breed for eggs too.

I'm going out for mothers day a day early. hmmm. don't know where. maybe the local catfish buffet.
 
Gwen Lynn
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Have a nice lunch & a Happy Mother's Day!
 
          
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Location: Northern Calif.
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Leah Sattler wrote:
if you are really interested you could raise quail fairly easily in the burbs. or rabbits. some people keep a few hens of a quiet breed for eggs too.

I'm going out for mothers day a day early. hmmm. don't know where. maybe the local catfish buffet.


Not a bad idea.... but I do have one problem , and that is with our Home Owners Assn ..... we are not allowed to keep animals to be raised for food...... however I do know one neighbor who has kept a couple of ducks in his back yard...... maybe he likes duck eggs ....... Balut anyone ?

Catfish !! Ohh do I love Catfish !.......... I haven't seen a Catfish Buffet since I was in New Orleans 15 years ago.

Hope everyone has a great weekend !

Now it's off to pick up something to make dinner with and I haven't a clue what to get........ I just got a new 12" 8 QT Camp Style  Cast Iron Dutch Oven that I'd like to break it in......hmmm what sounds good ?
 
          
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Location: Northern Calif.
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Looks like I going to make up some stuffed peppers in the new Dutch Oven......... mix up some beef and sausage with some garlic , red onions ,mushrooms , kidney beans , rice , salsa , salt n pepper , and whatever else I can find to toss in some yellow bell peppers.....wish me luck 
 
Leah Sattler
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stuffed peppers are awesome! I can't wait for my garden to start shelling them out so I can eat them more regualrly. they are so expensive to buy they don't get on the menu often in the off season. I was thrilled to find that a local greenhouse had a zillion varieties of pepper seedlings! and they are very reasonably priced...so I went a ltitle crazy with the peppers. honestly though...I think I will go back and get some more pimentos. I keep my pantry stocked with canned pimentos and green chilies to throw into recipes and they are 1$ or more for a little jars of pimentos. for the off brand of chilis its just .56 but still..... maybe that can be my goal for this years garden canning. I picked tomatoes and canned green beans to see if I could provide for a years worth and it seems I have met that goal. this year...peppers.
 
                              
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Location: MASSACHUSETTS 35 MI W OF BOSTON
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I love New England, My brother lives in Plymouth and did some digging, I am lucky enough to have oysters, and quahogs, to make something with, i am thinking a stew, New England style, cream butter, a  few token veggies, and ice cold beer. I always have a wonderful salad, not home grown yet, all  I have now in the garden is scallions, marjoram, lavender, many dandelions hah.... but they are nice additions to the salad..
 
Leah Sattler
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what are qhahogs?

 
                              
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Location: MASSACHUSETTS 35 MI W OF BOSTON
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they are clams of a sort, a bivalve anyway, not typically steamed, but shucked and mixed with great flavors and stuffed back inthe shell... you then bake them and eat them with a fork, the shell becomes the serving plate , if you will. they are tough, so long cooking or very short cooking is the thing. growing up near the ocean, we are lucky for all the food we can forage, if we are responsible about it...........
 
Leah Sattler
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once when I was in washington some of the people I was with all went clam digging and that is what we had for dinner. that was my first experience with just going out and finding your own food. (as well as my first and last taste of fresh clams). I also was turned on to growing strawberries there. they had terraced gardens leading down to the water and they were full of luscious strawberries. I'm sure they thought I was nuts. I much preferred to sit there and hunt strawberries than hang out with everyone!
 
          
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Location: Northern Calif.
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Well tonight I just wanted to have something abit different..... something I hadn't had in a while...... so I through together some veggie sandwiches out of what I had in the fridge......... In todays case it went like this : Be fore warned I only measure stuff if I'm baking so in this case as usual I didn't measure anything with respect to quantity of ingredients.

Red Bell Pepper cut up into roughly 3/8 " strips a couple of inches long.
Red onion sliced up.
Brocolli stalks.... after slicing off the tough outer skin I sliced up the core into roughly 3/16" thick X a couple inches long.
White Button mushrooms sliced..... only had 4 left.
A couple of tomato's sliced.
Portabella mushrooms about 4" wide..... sliced up into 1/2" X 2 " slices after removing the gills.
Some sliced up left over canned pitted black olives that were in the fridge.
Green onion..... sliced up on the bias.
String Beans ...... sliced lengthwise split down the middle and cut on bias .
Garlic...... 4 cloves smashed and chopped.
Ginger .... a small hunk of ginger smashed and chopped.
Italian Seasoning...... to taste
Black Pepper ...... to Taste.
Fake Balsamic Vinegar ..... a splash or two.
Soy Sauce .... a splash or two.
Pace Med Heat Chunky Salsa....... I don't know I tossed some in till it looked right....
Red Pepper flakes....... A pinch.
Un Processed Wheat Bran...... a pinch or two..... pretty much tasteless but just adds extra  fiber.....
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sauteed  it all into my 12" cast iron skillet with some Extra Virgin Olive Oil....... cooked up long enough so that the beans were cooked through but still retained their taste and were just abit aldente............ Had to add a small amount of water when it wasn't quite done yet but was getting too dry.......

When it was all fully cooked...... I tossed the mixture on some 6" long sour dough sandwich rolls that were lightly toasted and slathered with mustard and  some thin sliced Cracker Barrel Cheddar Cheese.

This makes a very tasty healthy meal that is bold enough taste wise not to miss the fact that there was no meat in it...... spicy enough for just enough heat without burning...... and quite filling.

Feel free to try it your way with whatever ya have sitting around ........ I tried this as an experiment years and years ago and it worked out well.

 
 
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