Win a copy of The School Garden Curriculum this week in the Kids forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Anne Miller
  • Mike Jay
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Burra Maluca
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • James Freyr
  • Mike Barkley
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Greg Martin
  • Pearl Sutton

Jean Pain - Compost Based Bio-Energy System  RSS feed

 
Posts: 3
Location: Central Texas
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Found this video over on Google+. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=a4jrskze_UU

Has anyone on this forum done any work on this type of system? What types of problems did you run into setting it up, using, and maintaining it?

 
steward
Posts: 3425
Location: woodland, washington
97
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I made a pile of wood chips with some polyethylene tube coiled through it for water heat, but skipped the much more complicated biogas part. my pile wasn't as big as Jean Pain's, but I got 140 Fahrenheit water for several months, though it's gradually cooling off now. the things probably five months old and I would guess the water coming out is about 120 Fahrenheit.

the only real problem I ran into was finding enough material to build the pile.
 
Gregor Eisenhorn
Posts: 3
Location: Central Texas
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
To clarify, I do not want to go in and cut a bunch of trees, and brush to make a compost pile, but to add water heating and gas collection of the compost piles already being used.
 
Gregor Eisenhorn
Posts: 3
Location: Central Texas
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks, Tel. I'l have to keep in mind the amount of material needed.
 
                            
Posts: 18
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Perhaps check out mb-soft.com there is some detailed info on the use of biomass for heating the house and water using fallen leaves and grass more than wood as you have to chip the wood so small. He has a bunch of other idea's on the site some interesting and some out there.
 
Posts: 155
Location: Sierras
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Gregor? Are you trying to bio-gasification - as in an anaerobic process? Like chicken shit and cow manure? or just humanure? Cows do about 55kg, chickens about 0.17kg per day per head of manure...

How are you going to 'collect gas'??
 
pollinator
Posts: 940
Location: Stevensville, MT
17
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Paul, Caleb, and Krista talk about hot water in this podcast: hot water podcast

They talk about the Jean Pain Method.
 
Posts: 9
Location: Central Maine Highlands on the cool side of zone 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

tel jetson wrote:I made a pile of wood chips with some polyethylene tube coiled through it for water heat, but skipped the much more complicated biogas part. my pile wasn't as big as Jean Pain's, but I got 140 Fahrenheit water for several months, though it's gradually cooling off now. the things probably five months old and I would guess the water coming out is about 120 Fahrenheit.

the only real problem I ran into was finding enough material to build the pile.



could you share more about your system, are you still using it?
 
tel jetson
steward
Posts: 3425
Location: woodland, washington
97
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

ann sterling wrote:
could you share more about your system, are you still using it?



I am not still using it. it was pretty simple to build, though. layer of wood chips, spiral of poly pipe, layer of wood chips, spiral of poly pipe. I sprayed water on and stomped each layer.

we used it to heat bath water, which I don't think is the best use for something like that. because it is constantly producing heat, it would be much better for something that also needs constant heat. running the hot water through a radiator to heat a living space, for example.
 
ann sterling
Posts: 9
Location: Central Maine Highlands on the cool side of zone 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

tel jetson wrote:

ann sterling wrote:
could you share more about your system, are you still using it?



I am not still using it. it was pretty simple to build, though. layer of wood chips, spiral of poly pipe, layer of wood chips, spiral of poly pipe. I sprayed water on and stomped each layer.

we used it to heat bath water, which I don't think is the best use for something like that. because it is constantly producing heat, it would be much better for something that also needs constant heat. running the hot water through a radiator to heat a living space, for example.



Thanks for that! Was it plumbed into a pressurized supply?
 
tel jetson
steward
Posts: 3425
Location: woodland, washington
97
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

ann sterling wrote:
Thanks for that! Was it plumbed into a pressurized supply?



the supply was gravity fed from a tank up a hill. never measured it, but based on my best guess at the altitude change, it was probably in the vicinity of 15 psi or so.
 
ann sterling
Posts: 9
Location: Central Maine Highlands on the cool side of zone 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

tel jetson wrote:

ann sterling wrote:
Thanks for that! Was it plumbed into a pressurized supply?



the supply was gravity fed from a tank up a hill. never measured it, but based on my best guess at the altitude change, it was probably in the vicinity of 15 psi or so.



Perfect, thanks very much!
 
Lasagna is spaghetti flavored cake. Just like this tiny ad:
global solutions you can do at home or in your backyard
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/paulwheaton/better-world-boo
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!