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Natural pest control- catch and release

 
Posts: 1913
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
145
kids duck forest garden chicken pig bee greening the desert homestead
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This is the second bull snake I've relocated. The first was desperately trying to eat a peacock egg. This one was simply near the barn and thus relocated. So in these pics I have an apple tree that is just riddled with ground squirrel holes underneath it. So we put this little bull snake in the hole and wished it good hunting!



Enjoy the rest of the parts of these pictures. The mini  krater growing trees. The lone surviving comfrey plant. The various plants that are starting to volunteer themselves there.
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Posts: 118
Location: winston oregon
cattle forest garden greening the desert
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non poisonous snakes and allan savory's holistic management will be your best friends.

on a side not how much acreage and time do you have. do you own the land and are you willing to create extreme amounts of content.

it may be a good idea to plant as many trees as you can with a focus on nitrogen fixing trees that cattle can eat from.
you can also plant bush beans as an understory for the trees to reduce irrigation
it may be a good idea to grow feed for animals and plant your crops within that framework so that you can go in before the cattle and harvest everything you can and then graze the livestock behind you so that you can replant that area with useful plants while weeding out any plants you dislike
 
Posts: 23
Location: North Island - New Zealand
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elle sagenev wrote:This is the second bull snake I've relocated. The first was desperately trying to eat a peacock egg. This one was simply near the barn and thus relocated. So in these pics I have an apple tree that is just riddled with ground squirrel holes underneath it. So we put this little bull snake in the hole and wished it good hunting!



Enjoy the rest of the parts of these pictures. The mini  krater growing trees. The lone surviving comfrey plant. The various plants that are starting to volunteer themselves there.



Heck...you are handling that snake..  Here in New Zealand we do not have snakes - nothing poisonous - Oh except for a supposed spider called a "Red Back" - very very rare and in my 72 years I have never seen one.
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1913
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
145
kids duck forest garden chicken pig bee greening the desert homestead
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Donald MacLeod wrote:Heck...you are handling that snake..  Here in New Zealand we do not have snakes - nothing poisonous - Oh except for a supposed spider called a "Red Back" - very very rare and in my 72 years I have never seen one.



Ah that makes me sad for you! I love snakes! But we do have a venomous one in these parts so that's no fun.
 
Farmers know to never drive a tractor near a honey locust tree. But a tiny ad is okay:
3 Plant Types You Need to Know: Perennial, Biennial, and Annual
https://permies.com/t/96847/Pros-cons-perennial-biennial-annual
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