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It's late spring/early summer... what are you planting?

 
Posts: 41
Location: Western Oregon (Willamette Valley), 8a/8b
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forest garden foraging rabbit chicken cooking homestead
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My spring garden is taking off, but I have some extra space here and there and am just wondering, what are some good things to try planting a little later in spring? My last frost date is about 20 weeks away.

So, what are you planting right now? In particular, what are some things that I can sow outdoors by seed now, or propagate easily?

As for me, I just transplanted a bunch of strawberry runners and a whole bunch of nasturtium seeds along the edges of my garden, and I see a bunch of volunteer squash just coming up right now.
 
gardener
Posts: 678
Location: Western Washington
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duck forest garden personal care rabbit bee homestead
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I'm just north of you. Every year, I experiment more and more with what we call "shoulder season" gardening here (fall, winter, and spring gardening). Now is a great time to sow sunflowers for bee forage (lemon queen is one of the best I hear). I'm also sowing brassicas. They'll grow really fast and try to bolt, but that's ok, because the flowers are good broccoli substitutes and are good for the bees. Starting in July I'll start seriously seeding for my fall garden--lots of greens and brassicas. This year I had collards, unprotected, straight from the garden all winter long. Then this spring they flowered and fed the pollinators. I'm still pulling leaves off them.

Towards fall, buckwheat and garlic will go in, too. Leeks, miner's lettuce (which is very winter hardy), and some cabbages, too
 
Rebecca Rosa
Posts: 41
Location: Western Oregon (Willamette Valley), 8a/8b
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You reminded me I have some sunflower seeds, so those went in the ground.
I planted a bunch of pod radishes and carrots, too. The radishes are grown for pods not roots so they love the heat, and I've seen butterflies and even hummingbirds visiting the blooms. As for the carrots... I never really have luck with them but I've heard there's never a bad time to plant carrots...? Might as well try I guess.
 
James Landreth
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Posts: 678
Location: Western Washington
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I have a terrible time growing carrots. They're hard to germinate if you're not on top of keeping them wet and they take forever. July will be a great time to start seeds for fall
 
Posts: 76
Location: Kitsap Penninsula, WA
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Hi there!
We are up here on the Kitsap Peninsula. Our garden starts going in about March with potatoes and the like (although this year, we had 2 feet of snow when I would usually start chitting potatoes, so they didn't go in until the end of April) and I've now gotten the whole garden in for the first round of stuff.

Right now I am sowing dill (bouquet and mammoth), more kale, salad greens (wild garden mix from Territorial) and mustards in the raised bed gardens to replenish what has already been eaten and or/bolted. We spot sow radish about every 2 weeks in whatever spare piece of soil we've got. I've been coming away from broccoli and raab, and just sowing red russian kale for baby greens, then kale raab, then flowers, then seeds. It's just so much easier than fussing over broccoli. This weekend another round of Daikon radish is going in the ground. Cilantro is sown every 3 weeks or so.

Also, I grow lot's of herbs from seed and spend the summer getting them big and healthy in 4 inch pots (sweet marjoram, lovage, thyme, sage, all the parsley) and then put them in the ground at the end of September. So this time of year is spent up-potting herbs and setting them in the happiest places to get hale and hearty for transplanting.

Here's how I grow carrots:
Rake the soil flat, spread seed (I don't use pelleted seed - the germination rate is not as good in my opinion) cover with an inch of sifted compost. Water 3 times a week. Then thin as they get out of control. I usually put carrots and dill on the borders of beds where I've put beans. This year, they are just on every border in every available piece of soil b/c it's obvious that I have a problem. A growing food problem. I need, like, a program or something.

I'm banking on the idea that our growing season this year will be long and warm - well into the end of October. I'm just gonna keep putting stuff in the ground and see what does well.

Oh! You could start calendula or cosmos! So pretty...I use dried calendula petals in our herb salt and the cosmos are just for vanity. You could also put in some sweet peas (like old spice mix - they smell bonkers) and trellis them.

Okay, I'll stop now...

Have fun!

 
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