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Sustainable Living Architecture  RSS feed

 
Marcella Rose
Posts: 95
Location: Central Texas, it is dry here.
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So...my husband and I watched episode 1 of Neverland (Syfy) and oh WOW! 6:40'ish into this clip and I was floored by the tree city (Click here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obtcR4reuaU). It is the perfect example of permaculture in action...even if it is fiction.

It reminds me of the living bridges that takes generations to build in this video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jrmm7gjZGE

What are your thoughts about sustainable living architecture on the scale of a "tree city?"
 
Atom Dari
Posts: 22
Location: New Orleans presently
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i'm going to have to research this one, i'd like to know a good list of the best plants to use for architectural forms like that and more.
 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6795
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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I once removed a rotting pergola from a mass of wisteria vines. It maintained the shape pretty well without the original structure. Strangler figs often stand long after the host tree has rotted away.

In temperate climates there are many vines which will grow along a hemp rope and support themselves once it rots away.
 
Brian Knight
Posts: 554
Location: Asheville NC
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This is such a great idea with so much to explore. I know sycamores are a great variety to experiment with and take well to grafting interesting, perhaps useful shapes. This really could be the future of permaculture building and architecture in general. Would love to hear more ideas on it.
 
Dwayne Petterson
Posts: 1
Location: 940 Front St, San Diego, CA 92101
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This video is so good. It actually reminds me of a lost time when the Scifi Channel actually produced Science Fiction.

 
Mike Dayton
Posts: 149
Location: sw pa zone 5
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If you cut Locus posts in the spring when the sap is running and plant them in the ground they will sprout and grow roots. I do not see any reason why you couldn't graft cross members to the posts once they are rooted. The living " structure " would be an open air sort of a thing, like a pergala, but could be very attractive. I have toyed with this sort of thing in my mind for some time. Thinking more along the idea of a living fence made by grafting branches to tree trunks that are planted fairly close together. The process does take time, but the finished product is unbelievable. The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago, the 2nd best time to plant a tree is Today. Lets get out there and plant some trees we may never sit in that trees shade . I wish my Grandfather had planted more walnuts. Go ahead and try, if it works, wow, what a great finished product. If it does not work, oh well, try something diff. The only people who never make mistakes are the people who do nothing. Lets get out there and make some mistakes. )
 
Nacho Collado
Posts: 42
Location: Granada City (that's in the south of Spain)
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i have a test going on... made a circular trench with an spiral entrance and buried cane roots on it, i expect to have sort of a room with living cane walls of about 4 to 6 meters high and a space of around 100 square meters/yards it will be open sky but will hide us and give shadow in the summer hot




Mediterranean cane roots (Arundo donax)
 
Marcella Rose
Posts: 95
Location: Central Texas, it is dry here.
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Thank you for all of your replies! I am glad I am not the only person that sees the value in experimenting with this idea.

Here is another video by Dr. Rachel Armstrong in London on living architecture...you might like this. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzsDutxxDLw



Also, in the book Harmony, by the Prince of Wales, he talks about ancient architecture and how so much of it is related to the same geometry that is related all through nature. Our ancestors really had a key that was lost a long time ago as their buildings still are standing and in use whereas recent structures are already being "condemed" and not usable. In "fractal thinking" (which is what I do) ancient architecture and living architecture are related in the fact that nature really is the main ingredient...we just have to learn the formula or perhaps the language is a better term. Once we learn the "how" we can then purpose to teach others not only the how, but also the "why."

This is a very exciting topic!
 
Arthur Buitelaar
Posts: 1
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Very exciting indeed!

I found this site: http://www.naturbauten.org/index.html
It's in german and has some great video's on this topic. This guy is growing houses!

http://www.treedome.com/index.html
This is an English site but with less information.

His theory is that by grafting branches together diagonally, eventually the branches will become thicker, close the gap and become a solid wall.
I couldn't find examples of walls where this has already happened, but I think it's really interesting.

I put some willow cuttings in the ground arching over a small stream and will try to grow a bridge this way.
 
Marcella Rose
Posts: 95
Location: Central Texas, it is dry here.
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Arthur Buitelaar wrote:

His theory is that by grafting branches together diagonally, eventually the branches will become thicker, close the gap and become a solid wall.
I couldn't find examples of walls where this has already happened, but I think it's really interesting.

I put some willow cuttings in the ground arching over a small stream and will try to grow a bridge this way.


I have seen this done with esparlier fencing and thought the same about that concept! I just do not have the land to try it out. Thank God that someone is out there DOING this! I am so happy! Thank you for sharing that and please, please...when you have the time, I would love to see pictures or diagrams of what you are doing!

***I am going to watch the videos with my hubby later tonight.
 
Sam John
Posts: 2
Location: New Delhi, India
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Still wondering how a branch(a branch created by grafting two different branches together) can become thicker after grafting.
Both videos are nice.
 
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