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Planning for Permaculture in Longview, WA

 
gardener
Posts: 4295
Location: Missoula, MT US Hardy:5a Annual Precipitation: 15" Wind:4.2mph Temperature:18-87F
1631
transportation forest garden tiny house urban books greening the desert
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Planting stuff will be a nest labor project for the gardening and homesteading projects in Longview, WA, and I want to make it so that this is a "one unit of thought and one unit of action" thing, like Paul has mentioned that we're kinda aiming for the whole permaculture thing- making it simple to do well and be aligned with Nature.

Soooo, from some of Paul's podcast's this is kinda the attitude I want to use in deciding how to do permaculture. It's roughly how Paul Wheaton has described taking a hint from the Book of Nature:
"Pigweed grows everywhere in Montana!"
"Hmm... I wonder what I ought to plant in Montana?"
"Pigweed! (amaranth)"

Essentially, what I want to do is take some of those hints from the Book of Nature and find less prickly and tastier things related to the things that already do well in this area.
Currently, the major things I notice that do really awesome are: blackberries, teasel, thistle, and this weird green bushy-tail thing.

These are some pictures of the property to get an idea of what grows in this area.


What kind of edible tasty plants do really awesome in the Cascadia region that you can just plant willy-nilly and not have to take care of whatsoever? I'm aiming towards the Sepp Holzer approach of Book of Nature and "flick and kick" of seeds and "you're on your own!"
 
Dave Burton
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1631
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I created my very early draft of a plan for doing permaculture around the ponds that I have been repairing.

I got some ideas from these places:
Perennial Crops of PNW
Northern Bushcraft
Freshwater Ecosystems: Ponds for Permaculture
Plants for a Future

This is my very early plan:
 
Dave Burton
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1631
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For infrastructure, I was thinking that these might be things to consider:
-mulched walkways
-drip irrigation
-rocks to denote garden boundaries
-paddock shift fencing
-paddock shift animal house
-pond islands for a safe place for water fowl
-a footbridge over the spillway between the ponds
-vine trellises
 
That feels good. Thanks. Here's a tiny ad:
Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
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