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Jim Kovaleski's grass fed veggie method

 
Posts: 76
Location: Kitsap Penninsula, WA
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I stumbled across these videos on YouTube and have some questions for anyone who has done this.

1) Is there a certain kind of soil that is more appropriate for this method (say - clay soil vs sandy soil)
2) IF you use this method and do some watering, are you running irrigation under the dried grass as mulch or overhead? I'm thinking under...
3) I know his method doesn't use water at all - have any of you tried it successfully and in what climate do you live in.

Here are my specs for our land:
Pasture of mixed clover, grasses, dandelion.
Sandy loam - built up over the last 3 years but still quite sandy.
Ranging from neutral to acidic.

My misgiving is that with our sandy soil, some watering would be necessary at some time, but overhead watering would just sprout any seed heads from the grasses, even with 3x year hay harvesting by hand scythe (aka - trying to harvest grasses before they pop seed heads.)

I love to learn his methods, but it costs money to take his class and I don't want to invest in it only to find out our soil is not right for it.

Thanks everyone! (And besides, I think I can piece together his strategy just using common sense, but if the soil is off, it's all for nothing).
 
master pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Interesting!  His website says this :  "Annual Intensive Production vs. Permaculture . An honest look at why these systems should be blended & which system is really best suited for feeding people."

I wonder why he thinks that annual intensive production is not part of permaculture?

(Sorry, I'm not able to answer your question about the suitability for sandy soil)
 
pollinator
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Location: Montana
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I'm sure that Jim's class is interesting and potentially valuable (to a market gardener perhaps). However I see no reason why I or you could not try some of his methodology based on the freely available videos explaining his methods. It's basically a modification of the Ruth Stout method. So read Ruth's books, buy a scythe, read "The Scythe Book". Start laying down mulch, and see how it goes. Incidentally Ruth Stout had sandy soil and a frost pocket and it may have made her method work better: sand = less slugs. There are several other modifications of the Ruth Stout Method out there including Lasagna Gardening, Straw Bale Gardening, and the Back to Eden method of wood chip gardening. Research those as well: free online websites and videos, libraries, and cheap used books are available. If you don't want to scythe you might be able to get a lawnmower- perhaps even an electric, with a bagger and use grass clippings (I'm considering this). You may also find cheap or free other sources of organic mulch and use those instead.
 
Tyler Ludens
master pollinator
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William Schlegel wrote:I If you don't want to scythe you might be able to get a lawnmower- perhaps even an electric, with a bagger and use grass clippings (I'm considering this).



I've been using an electric lawnmower and I love it!  I would absolutely never use a gas mower, but I truly enjoy mowing with the electric mower.

 
Lindsey Jane
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William - straight up, brother. I agree. I saw that it was for sale and I instantly thought - well, the interwebs has a wealth of things to learn from for free, I can hack this. I actually have been researching getting a scythe because we have transitioned to no engine/no till (in the interest of the environment, my mental health, ease of use, etc) and I was already going to invest in one to cut our 1/3 acre pasture! Good thinking! I'm going to get Ruth's book. I'm so glad you reminded me of her methods, I had forgotten all about her...

Tyler - I have transitioned to an electric mower to mow the grass directly around our house and I. LOVE. IT. Ever so much. I plug it in, it turns on, there's less noise, no fumes, and I don't have to get it tuned up every year for 75$. Unfortunately, our pasture is too far away for cords, but the above solution seems like a good fit. Then I can truly ward off the zombies when they come knocking. I'll just stand in my pasture with my scythe. Plus maybe a black, hooded cloak. And a maniacal laugh.

Thanks, gents!
 
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