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How hot is goat manure?

 
Posts: 53
Location: West Palm Beach, FL
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I picked up about 20 gallons of goat shit yesterday, raked from underneath a shelter.  It clearly had been sitting there for a while, but not really composting as it was dry.  How nitrogen rich is this stuff?  

I plan to spread it around my in-ground fruit trees.  I'm sure it will be well received by the bananas, but I'm wondering how much I should stretch it for the rest of them.  Not really worried about it burning anything, but I am curious how it compares to cow and chicken manure.  Any insights?
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high quality goat poo
 
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Hi Conner,

From my understanding, Goat manure is like rabbit manure, in that it doesn't need composting, and won't burn like other fresh manures. I would treat it like rabbit manure in usage, and think you should be fine top dressing with it, like a mulch in reasonable application.

I hope that helps!
 
master pollinator
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Goatberries are pretty close to perfect in terms of C:N ratio. You're unlikely to burn anything unless it's super tender, like new seedlings.
 
Conner Murphy
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Awesome! Thanks guys.
 
gardener
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Since it has dried you should be good to go. Goat manure is well balanced when it comes to N,P,K as long as the animals had a good and varied diet.
If it was fresh however, then you need to treat it like any other ruminant manure and compost it prior to use.
The reasons you want to compost or age cow manure are the same reasons you want to treat goat or sheep manure the same way, pathogens.

Composting manures is more about killing off pathogens than it is about regulating nutrients.

Redhawk
 
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