Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

transplanting

 
Posts: 2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hello im in the process of moving from lower michigan to northern michigan and i have several daffodills and peonies and a few rose bushes that have been growing on this property for almost 50 years it was my parents property i really hate to leave them can i trasnsplant them during the summer months or should i wait till fall the bank took the house after my mom passed away so im not leaving them anything maybee a few dead roses greedy buggers any answers would be greatly appreciated thank you
 
master pollinator
Posts: 11353
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
738
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would move them now.

 
Posts: 235
Location: Richwood, West Virginia
3
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lookee Lookee!

For those transplant shocked trees dissolve a vitamin B-12 capsule in a quart of water then dilute to one half gallon and water the poor things, it will help their root systems recover faster.  


link



 
Posts: 525
Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
143
transportation hugelkultur cat forest garden fish trees urban chicken cooking woodworking homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Keeping family heritage plants is always important - many cultivars are unavailable now and they're a way to memorialise people.

Based on your climate, it seems they could be moved anytime between Spring and late Summer. Other times may not allow the plants to grow a suitable root system before Winter. (Harden off)

Regardless, ensure you take a large rootball with dirt attached, cleanly trim any roots with sécateurs to avoid disease, and trim the plant back a bit to lower transpiration. Wrap the rootball in hessian (it breathes) and keep moist.

Get them into the new spot soon thereafter, mulch with compost and water in well with dilute seaweed/fish liquid fertiliser - not actually a fertiliser, more of a soil conditioner increasing microbial activity.

Avoid using manure or other fertilisers until next Summer, it could caused fertiliser burn.

(Also, when transporting in a car, cover them with a tarp or cloth to avoid wind and sun burn.)
 
Posts: 17
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Also, when you're trimming the plant (as F Agricola recommended) keep some of the trimmed pieces as cuttings and start them rooting. When we moved from Maryland to Florida, that's how I was able to bring my husband's favorite rose.
 
mooooooo ..... tiny ad ....
A rocket mass heater heats your home with one tenth the wood of a conventional wood stove
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!