Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

wheels in the wild - raven becomes better at photography (hopefully)

 
master steward & author
Posts: 16271
Location: Left Coast Canada
3828
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The goal: to become a better photographer.

The method: learn by doing.  Take photos of spinning wheels in different settings with the idea that spinning wheels are more or less the same, but each location will teach me something new.

I want to learn:
  • compisistion - how to compose the photo so it looks good
  • how to see what my camera sees
  • how to get my camera to see what I see
  • all about light and how it influences the photo
  • how to take classic style photography
  • how to take stock photography
  • what all these buttons do on my camera
  • delete not-perfect photos


  • This thread is about me exploring photography.  I suspect the photos I share with you won't be very good.  They will probably be the worst of the ones I take.  But I'm hoping that each will teach me something and over time I'll improve.

    To start with, I'm focusing on taking the photo.  I want to take good photos so that I don't have to do too much editing.  My theory is, the better the photo, the less time spent editing it.

    Why spinning wheels?  Because the basement is full of them and it's time for them to earn their keep.  



     
    r ranson
    master steward & author
    Posts: 16271
    Location: Left Coast Canada
    3828
    books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    My first attempt is on a sunny day at about 1pm.  The day is hot and dusty but my thought was I could find a shady spot and take pictures.  
    The place I chose was beautiful, but not right for this time of year or day.

    No matter what angle I took the photo at, it felt like the wheel was backlit.  

    My main focus today was to
  • get started
  • experiment with the rule of thirds and composistion



  • 22-july-19-tripod-elk-bever-lake-(1).JPG
    [Thumbnail for 22-july-19-tripod-elk-bever-lake-(1).JPG]
    This is near the old filter beds. The city water used to come from this lake and the water would pass through these reedy sand ponds before being piped into water towers in town.
    22-july-19-tripod-elk-bever-lake-(5).JPG
    [Thumbnail for 22-july-19-tripod-elk-bever-lake-(5).JPG]
    I like the story this tells of being in the middle of the field with trees in the background. But to get the trees and horizon straight, the wheel was on a slant. This would be a good setting to play with depth of field.
    22-july-19-tripod-elk-bever-lake-(22).JPG
    [Thumbnail for 22-july-19-tripod-elk-bever-lake-(22).JPG]
    I'm in the shade, the wheel is in the shade. Here's a nice tree to divide the picture at the third line. But the lighting is all wrong. There's no pzazz to this picture.
    22-july-19-tripod-elk-bever-lake-(39).JPG
    [Thumbnail for 22-july-19-tripod-elk-bever-lake-(39).JPG]
    This so far is my favourite. But the wheel isn't really in focus as much as I wanted and I was going for a glammer shot that gave me the whole wheel. I took this when I was getting fed up with not getting good photos.
     
    r ranson
    master steward & author
    Posts: 16271
    Location: Left Coast Canada
    3828
    books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
    • Likes 2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I added 'delete not-perfect photos' to my list of things to learn.  This is going to be a difficult thing to learn as I think I have saved every single digital photo I ever took.  Which means I'm wasting a lot of computer space storing crappy photos.  
     
    gardener
    Posts: 581
    163
    personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
    • Likes 6
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    In one of my wild variety of jobs, I used to work as a curator, for a photographer, so am very familiar with the difficulty - and importance - of weeding out the less than perfect photos. In my experience, it was most effectively & efficiently accomplished as part of a system of categorization. I looked at each shot to determine:
    A - quality; I tossed anything unsalvageable, and kept folders for things that would be perfect, with minor tweaking
    B - topic (hers were many!)
    C - chronology
    As I sorted, we'd confer on tweaking options, according to what she was willing to do. If something only needed minor cropping, she often left that to me. If it was a lighting issue, that was more of an 'artsy' thing, in most cases, so was left to her. Editing out things that could detract from the shot, like a power line, an unexpected/ accidental photo bomb, etc were divided between us according to time requirements, skill, etc.

    All of this sorting took a lot of space, too, but in the long run, it saved untold gigs, and made finding specific pics much easier. We researched many online tools, to help sort them all out, and hands down, Dropbox was the best one, for our purposes, because it was fairly inexpensive, shareable, and infinite folders and files are possible. But, they key for us, was moving things off the hard drives, as we went. That did a couple important things. First, it freed up space on the hard drives, for photo dumps, to add to my never ending job security. But, just as importantly, it helped us keep track of exactly what had been curated, and what hadn't. When two people are working on something like this, and at different times, speeds, and decision making abilities (anything I was unsure of had to be deferred to her, lol), keeping track would otherwise have been a nightmare. Ymmv... Good luck!
     
    There's a way to do it better - find it. -Edison. A better tiny ad:
    permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
    https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
    • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
    • New Topic
    Boost this thread!