• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • jordan barton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Leigh Tate
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Greg Martin
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Jay Angler
gardeners:
  • Nancy Reading
  • Mike Barkley
  • Christopher Shepherd

Permaculture attempt in high desert of California

 
Posts: 4
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
any update on this post?   im in los angeles but would like to move to high desert or establish some sort of part time base to experiment with permaculture ideas.  socal deserts are rough - hard if you're not there all the time to prevent squatters and thieves grabbing your stuff.  anyone else have experience in this regard?  im somewhat new to the forum but maybe this has been discussed elsewhere.
 
Posts: 12
Location: California Republic - The Angels County - Antelope Valley
2
forest garden urban solar
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Madeline Breeze wrote:any update on this post?   im in los angeles but would like to move to high desert or establish some sort of part time base to experiment with permaculture ideas.  socal deserts are rough - hard if you're not there all the time to prevent squatters and thieves grabbing your stuff.  anyone else have experience in this regard?  im somewhat new to the forum but maybe this has been discussed elsewhere.



The Adobe Mountain โ›ฐ Foothills-Permaculture Experiment Experience (AMF-PEE) continues...! ๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ‘‘๐ŸŽ‰

https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=2297744297162786&ref=content_filter
 
Madeline Breeze
Posts: 4
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
is that in Lancaster, CA?  your stove looks pretty cool, did it work well through our long winter?  hard to tell from your photos how much planting you have done but i see some trees and strawberries!  what has been your greatest success and challenge so far?  thanks for sharing!
 
Guadagno Attilio-Cesare
Posts: 12
Location: California Republic - The Angels County - Antelope Valley
2
forest garden urban solar
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Madeline Breeze wrote: is that in Lancaster, CA?  your stove looks pretty cool, did it work well through our long winter?  hard to tell from your photos how much planting you have done but i see some trees and strawberries!  what has been your greatest success and challenge so far?  thanks for sharing!



Yes, the AMFPEE Land is located on unincorporated Los Angeles County, Butte Valley, (Lancaster), California Republic.

โ€œLil Frankensteinโ€ (AMFPEEโ€™s new mini-rocket-mass-heater/stove) was only just completed following the completion of this last Winter Season.

Greatest challenge, from my perspective, is creating shade which will withstand OUR strong prevailing winds and the unpredictable other tan prevailing winds.
Perceived โ€œ...greatest success...โ€ would be the fact that i have been able to grow food-bearing  plants successfully through to harvest while keeping the plethora of desert reptiles and mammals from eating them before i DO! ๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ‘‘๐ŸŽ‰
 
Posts: 2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Super sad to hear how this ended. I am sure you inspired and sobered many. We were all hoping you would flourish there and what took an evening to read took years for you. I don't live in the USA yet but My wife and I have been considering something similar in Llano Ca. This thread makes me wonder how to build a guild of like minded people. I have been so caught up thinking about the land, Fukuoka, Mollison, keyline principles etc. But in the end community is really key. Caring not only for the earth but also helping each other be our best and sharing with our neighbors.
 
Posts: 1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi! I live in Twentynine Palms; your neighbor!! We have similar climates. I want to hear an update on the project! And see pics!
8071B85D-7BB7-483F-B152-35A7388DD12C.jpeg
Friend Carl showing the state of our soil!
Friend Carl showing the state of our soil!
 
Posts: 1
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi! I am doing the same thing in high desert in south eastern Arizona, in the Sonora desert.  The climate and wind issues seem similar to barstow.  I also plan to use bamboo! It came to that conclusion the other day,  they grow so fast and can provide shade. Our problem is the cows that roam here destroy everything.  Also the native animals are so desperate for foods and water they go to extreme lengths and often eat plants that are unpalatable for them. Squrriels, rats, mice, rattlesnakes, birds, cows, deer.... anything around here will eat my garden.

Trees are mostly mesquite and only reach like 6 feet tall if not in a wash. Soil is very high clay and rock, extremely erosive,  high wind is an issue. Very little shade.

Here is the good stuff: 5000 ft elevation, lots of sunshine,  two riverheads coming off big mountain,  good well water, sky island effect, nice hiking trails, so much potential for recovery.

The ecosystem is collapsed from overgrazing for 150 years and was probably delicate anyway. The sky island effect is obviously caused by cows because they can't eat oaks on rocky hilltops so it is a different biome there. I like cows but they have decimated the landscape. Trapping all the beavers in Arizona to extinction also played a part.....
 
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would love to buy some desert land in California and try this , smart irrigation and planting trees and other plants that hold water to bring in wildlife., Maybe even shade structures over water holes as well to maintain the water?
 
Posts: 53
7
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ranch Seekers wrote: Our problem is the cows that roam here destroy everything.  Also the native animals are so desperate for foods and water they go to extreme lengths and often eat plants that are unpalatable for them. Squrriels, rats, mice, rattlesnakes, birds, cows, deer.... anything around here will eat my garden....



yep, this is a problem.

If you think you are going to plant stuff in the ground (I don't care what it is) gophers, rabbits, bugs, etc will eat it instantly.

I don't think people put enough into protection.

Also, if you plan to leave the property for a spell .... well, look what happened to the OP in this thread.
 
Posts: 1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you for sharing this challenge! It sounds like many people here are trying to figure out similar situations. I'm also trying a permaculture approach near Santa Clara, which is super dry in the summer. I don't have any advice to offer except to say that I've come to love my clay soil. It retains water really well once you get a thick mulch on top (I used woodchips from Chip Drop), and in the winter during the rainy season you can propagate cuttings by literally sticking them in the clay. All my plants & trees seem to bust through it just fine if it's reasonably moist. The key is never letting it hardpan, so... more mulch! Best of luck in the future!!
 
sunglasses are a type of coolness prosthetic. Check out the sunglasses on this tiny ad:
Rocket Mass Heater Plans - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/7/rmhplans
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic