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Laundry water + pumping

 
pioneer
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Location: Rocky Mountains, USA
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Okay, this is probably a repeat, but I didn't see it in a search.

Here in the American West water is always in short supply.  For the past couple of years I've been using greywater from the laundry to water a section of the property. (aka "laundry to landscape")

Unfortunately the washing machine (yeah, ditched the dryer, but some conveniences are too much to pass up in this stage of life) is in the basement.  What I've been doing is allow the washer to fill a plastic tote and then using an inexpensive sump pump to blow it outside through a hose.

This works... sort of.

Unfortunately, a tiny bit of carelessness results in a very big mess.  And even on a good day there is always some amount of nasty, grody water still remaining to stink up the house.

What I'd like to do is to have everything all plumbed in solid so that there's no longer stink or spill danger.  Also, since the water level would then be hidden from view I'd need the pump to turn on automatically whenever water is present.

I've found pumps like that for sale, but they want an arm and a leg (and at least one kidney) for the dumb things.

Any thoughts for how to rig this up on a reasonable (sub $100 USD) level?
 
pollinator
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Can you post pictures of your current setup? I have a hunch a few modifications instead of total replacement would save you a bunch of money. How big of a footprint are you okay with having? What size hose are you using to discharge? How high do you need it lifted to get outside?
 
pollinator
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It seems a sub-pump would work. They are about $60 and have a float switch that kicks them on. That is a pump/float switch combination, but a simple float switch could turn on any pump.

As far as the smell, I make the assumption that you do not have a P-Trap installed. That would eliminate the smell from coming back into the house. EVERY washing machine drain should have one of those though, just for that reason.
 
K Eilander
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Pretty straightforward.
IMG_20190816_133229.jpg
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1) Washer fills plastic tote
IMG_20190816_133326.jpg
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2) Watch till it's full, then flip the switch
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3) Water flows through this pump (sorry about the suds)
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4) Exits house through disused dryer vent hole (pay no attention to the upper pipe)
IMG_20190816_133023.jpg
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5) Flows into rose bush
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6) Which feeds the bees and everybody's happy :)
 
Travis Johnson
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Put a plywood cover over the tub, and seal it with caulk to keep down the smell, and then install a float switch on your submersible pump. That would cost you about $25.
 
T Melville
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I'm thinking ~$34, if your pump draws 10 amps or less, and if you still have the lid for that tote. (10 amps is a lot.)

Put the lid on, drill a hole just big enought to pass an "s" trap through. Fasten your washer discharge hose into the top of the "s" trap. ($6.98 at Lowe's)

Mount the float switch, and plug your pump into that. ($26.74 at Lowe's)
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T Melville
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Travis posted while I was typing. I like the plywood, too. A good alternative to the lid, plus tougher.
 
Travis Johnson
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T Melville wrote:Travis posted while I was typing. I like the plywood, too. A good alternative to the lid, plus tougher.



I just guessed on the price, so I am not surprised that it is a little more, but we both are thinking the same cheap solution.
 
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