• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • James Freyr
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Mike Haasl
  • r ranson
  • Jocelyn Campbell
master gardeners:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • thomas rubino
  • Kate Downham

Planting over an old construction site

 
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
28
forest garden rabbit greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The front of my house is, like many Haitian houses, where cement was mixed and left to harden. After I fenced in the space and started planting, I realized that there are several feet right under the window where there's still a large amount of hardened cement, gravel, and even, apparently, unmixed cement. Not only is it really hard to get through, it seems that in addition to our usual infertile soil, it's sucking up nutrients and moisture.

I've managed to move out most of the suffering plants to a friendlier location, but I'm trying desperately to make this space plantable. I'm burying organic material and compost and aged goat manure under more organic material and local soil. My thought is I'll try to raise the whole thing up about 18 inches or so with decent soil and plant resilient plants.

What can I plant there? Perennials, flowers or fruit or ornamentals. Under a high window (about 6 feet off the ground) and bare wall on each side. It is also the south side and gets a major beating by the sun each afternoon. I've planted an acerola cherry and a jackfruit to give shade, but they're young, so that will take time. It looks bare and ugly! Help!
 
pollinator
Posts: 11740
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
976
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Plant Moringa - it loves heat and grows amazingly fast!
 
Priscilla Stilwell
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
28
forest garden rabbit greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tyler Ludens wrote:Plant Moringa - it loves heat and grows amazingly fast!


I've got 3 cuttings in the ground right now, in front of the spot to give shade, but waiting for some signs of life. Might have to go the seedling route.

But morninga isn't exactly a front-of-the-house-focal-point plant. I need some pretty too!
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 11740
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
976
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
They have beautiful foliage and flowers, I think!
IMG_3354.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_3354.jpeg]
 
Priscilla Stilwell
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
28
forest garden rabbit greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like them in a mass planting as a backdrop. They look like lace. But I don't love them so much for the front of the house.

I'm actually thinking of planting a few clumps of vetiver grass for structure and to chop-and-drop for mulch, then just set a half dozen large cement or terracotta pots out with various structural plants in them. Once the soil is improved through the chop and drop, I can plant something more permanent. Maybe .  . .  :)
 
Message for you sir! I think it is a tiny ad:
Learn Permaculture through a little hard work
https://wheaton-labs.com/bootcamp
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic