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Lawn Care Regimen

 
Posts: 8
Location: Zone 7a : 0 to 5 (F)
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Hello

I've read the rich soil article etc but I was wondering if anyone just put together a simple guide that shows when to do each step.  For example, May fertilize, Sept overseed, etc with a list of what should be done on a regular basis.  I want to stay organic but I need a dummy's guide.

Thanks
Sam
 
Posts: 31
Location: Zone 7
7
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A lot depends on where you are.  Putting a general area in your profile would be very helpful!
 
Samer Abraham
Posts: 8
Location: Zone 7a : 0 to 5 (F)
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Gray Henon wrote:A lot depends on where you are.  Putting a general area in your profile would be very helpful!


Updated my profile but just it case it doesn't show when I post this time it's Zone 7a : 0 to 5 (F).
 
Gray Henon
Posts: 31
Location: Zone 7
7
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Zone 7 will usually put you square in the transitional zone, which usually comes down to microclimates.  Would you say you have mostly fescue/orchard/rye grasses or bermuda/dalis/crab?
 
Samer Abraham
Posts: 8
Location: Zone 7a : 0 to 5 (F)
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Gray Henon wrote:Zone 7 will usually put you square in the transitional zone, which usually comes down to microclimates.  Would you say you have mostly fescue/orchard/rye grasses or bermuda/dalis/crab?


I have just put down sod and it consists of this:
Kentucky Blue Grass Blend
19.86% Everglade Kentucky Blue Grass
19.84% Nudestiny Kentucky Blue Grass
19.76% America Kentucky Blue Grass
19.76% Freedom III Kentucky Blue Grass
19.64% Princeton P-105 Kentucky Blue Grass
 1.14% Inert matter
 
pollinator
Posts: 361
Location: Elizabeth City, North Carolina - Zone 8a - Humid
33
dog forest garden fish fungi bee solar
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I have found some great lawn care channels on YouTube! I usually look at what they are saying through a permaculture eye. But take timing and temp tips much more seriously. For instance the best time to seed or over seed a lawn is in the Fall. When annuals like crabgrass are checking out and your new grass will not be competing. I just keep the fact that I like clover (because it fixes 3k lbs of nitrogen per acre per year), and perennial wild flowers, etc in the back of my mind.

The best time to plant in the fall (Cool season grasses) is when the soil temps in your area reach 70F. You want the seeds to be germinating when the soil temp hits that point and give it at a minimum 45 days before first Hard Frost. Not mowing the first mow until day 30 and second mow at day 45.

I just bought a spike aerator for my new (mud hole) yard. This will help things like seed, water, air, and fertilizer to more easily get down in there (and stay put!) without washing away. There is a large list of steps I just skipped over. You will have to watch some vids.

There are also some links that you can type to find out your average first and last frost dates... as well as the current and average soil temps for your area. I don't have the links. At work... got to go... Sorry!
 
Gray Henon
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Location: Zone 7
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I'd get a soil test done, apply the recommended amount of lime, and overseed with white clover all in the next few weeks.  If your soil test shows you are very deficient in P or K, I'd look into a natural source. Recycled clippings and clover will provide all the N necessary.  The soil test is key or else you are just guessing.
 
Samer Abraham
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Location: Zone 7a : 0 to 5 (F)
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Marty Mitchell wrote:I have found some great lawn care channels on YouTube! I usually look at what they are saying through a permaculture eye. But take timing and temp tips much more seriously. For instance the best time to seed or over seed a lawn is in the Fall. When annuals like crabgrass are checking out and your new grass will not be competing. I just keep the fact that I like clover (because it fixes 3k lbs of nitrogen per acre per year), and perennial wild flowers, etc in the back of my mind.

The best time to plant in the fall (Cool season grasses) is when the soil temps in your area reach 70F. You want the seeds to be germinating when the soil temp hits that point and give it at a minimum 45 days before first Hard Frost. Not mowing the first mow until day 30 and second mow at day 45.

I just bought a spike aerator for my new (mud hole) yard. This will help things like seed, water, air, and fertilizer to more easily get down in there (and stay put!) without washing away. There is a large list of steps I just skipped over. You will have to watch some vids.

There are also some links that you can type to find out your average first and last frost dates... as well as the current and average soil temps for your area. I don't have the links. At work... got to go... Sorry!



Any particular videos or channels you recommend?
 
Samer Abraham
Posts: 8
Location: Zone 7a : 0 to 5 (F)
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Gray Henon wrote:I'd get a soil test done, apply the recommended amount of lime, and overseed with white clover all in the next few weeks.  If your soil test shows you are very deficient in P or K, I'd look into a natural source. Recycled clippings and clover will provide all the N necessary.  The soil test is key or else you are just guessing.


I’m planning on getting a soil test shortly.

Clover however lies squarely it the weed category for me. I spent a good deal to get rid of my old grass and get sod. So I’m not keen on adding more “weeds” to my lawn especially when I don’t keep bees. I understand the benefits but it’s not the aesthetics I’m aiming for.
 
Gray Henon
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In that case, you will need to add the appropriate amount of nitrogen, probably 2x per year, early spring and fall.  Keep an eye out for excessive thatch.
 
Samer Abraham
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Location: Zone 7a : 0 to 5 (F)
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Gray Henon wrote:In that case, you will need to add the appropriate amount of nitrogen, probably 2x per year, early spring and fall.  Keep an eye out for excessive thatch.


Ok so here’s what I’ve got so far:
Spring - Nitrogen
Fall - Nitrogen and overseed

Anything else?
 
Marty Mitchell
pollinator
Posts: 361
Location: Elizabeth City, North Carolina - Zone 8a - Humid
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Samer Abraham wrote:

Gray Henon wrote:In that case, you will need to add the appropriate amount of nitrogen, probably 2x per year, early spring and fall.  Keep an eye out for excessive thatch.


Ok so here’s what I’ve got so far:
Spring - Nitrogen
Fall - Nitrogen and overseed

Anything else?



Aeration of one form or another never hurts. Here are a few channels I have watched several videos on this subject. However, there are a lot of dedicated channels to lawn care on YouTube.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAYCKLOLHHCJL__9Ys_2PDg

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtpdUcJ3jBHxbkgUzRHuReg/videos

Here is a link to where to find out what the current, 5yr, and 10yr averages in your area are by date... for soil temps.

http://www.greencastonline.com/tools/soil-temperature

Obviously you need the new grass in Fall to germinate at least 45 days before first frost. This is mainly for cool season grasses such as fescue and rye. Warm season grasses like Bermuda and zoysia are going to be different.

I would find a channel that is dedicated to growing grass in a similar climate. For instance... thatch has a MUCH harder time breaking down in high altitude/arid climates than it does in say the South East. So your thatch will build faster and cause problems quicker in that altitude environment. Where in the SE there will be more microbial life due to the humidity and lower altitude.
 
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