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Who's been successful with fungi in dry, hot climates?

 
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
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forest garden rabbit greening the desert
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I am very interested in pursuing the benefits of fungi in the garden, but where I live, it's very dry, hot, and windy for much of the year, with some flooding during the relatively short rainy seasons. We also don't have a lot of shade since the oldest trees are about 6 years old. There's also very little access to fallen trees or logs to start the fungi spores.

I'm curious hearing how others in similar environments have countered these challenges. It seems that once the fungi gets established, it will help to resolve some of these very issues, but in the meantime, what would you suggest?
 
master pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Can you coppice some of the trees for sticks?
 
Priscilla Stilwell
pollinator
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Tyler Ludens wrote:Can you coppice some of the trees for sticks?



Yes, in limited amounts.
 
Tyler Ludens
master pollinator
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Fungi really love partially buried wood, so if you can get some sticks and put them in trenches or depressions, and cover with a little soil or other organic material, and water them a bit between rains, this may help increase the local fungi.  I put rings of sticks around my young trees when planting, and keep adding more logs and sticks as the trees grow.  This also helps keep the soil cooler as a mulch and protects the trees from Armadillos, who like to dig through other kinds of mulch.  
 
Posts: 30
Location: Reno, NV
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Try to grow fungi that grow in that kind of climate like: milky (Calocybe indica), white oyster (Pleurotus florida), pink oyster (P. djamor), paddy straw (Volvariella volvacea). They need moisture though, you can't grow them without it
 
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