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Daron's projects - big and small

 
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Location: Olympia, WA - Zone 8a/b
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Hey all,

I thought it would be fun to create a thread where I could share all my homesteading projects (big and small) with you all. I will be updating this thread on and off with my various homesteading projects. To see some of my existing projects check out these threads:

The results of 2+ years of wild homesteading and permaculture - showing how things have changed on my homestead. I will be updating this one with more comparison pictures as time goes.
Building a beaver dam - My attempt to build a beaver dam. I will be posting some updates later this fall once the rains come back enough to fill up the pond again. I'm also going to be expanding the dam soon and making some improvements to hold more water.
Introducing the Wild Ride Homestead - one of my early posts on permies that I'm not really updating.

The first new project I want to share with you all is a new shed I built over the weekend! This shed (see attached pictures) was built using mostly salvaged wood from various demolition jobs from my restoration sites and from a couple construction sites. I did have to buy some wood for the door but the rest of the shed (including the metal roof) is all salvaged material. This is the first time I have ever built a shed from scratch and I did it without using any existing designs/plans. It was fun figuring it all out and the shed will provide some nice extra storage for my family.

More projects coming soon!

Thanks all!
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Posts: 174
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
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Daron, will you now come over to my place and build that exact same shed for me? It's exactly what I need to go beside my rain barrels. What are the rough dimensions of this shed?
 
Daron Williams
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Diane Kistner wrote:Daron, will you now come over to my place and build that exact same shed for me? It's exactly what I need to go beside my rain barrels. What are the rough dimensions of this shed?



lol, I think you are a little far from my place The shed is approximately 5.5 feet high, 2 feet deep and 3.5 feet wide.
 
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I did something similar this weekend as well. I live in a Tiny House, but need some tools now and then. I like to have them close by so I repurposed a duck coop to hold some common tools. Like you I used salvaged materials so it did not cost me anything.

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Duck Coop Closed
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Duck Coop Opened
 
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i like your duck koop, looks like the perfect design to be built with the scraps that contractors discard when building houses.
i guess  duck eggs will be on menu soon.
 
Travis Johnson
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bruce Fine wrote:i like your duck koop, looks like the perfect design to be built with the scraps that contractors discard when building houses.
i guess  duck eggs will be on menu soon.




We designed it so that it is 3x5 feet, exactly the size of a piece of concrete board. With that in the bottom, it i easy to scrape out. But the 3 foot depth is ideal because you do not have to reach in very deep to get out the muck, or grab a duck/chicken.

Ducks go in by themselves at night, so we just have to go out and shut the door...if we remember. It would hold 5 ducks at most, but it was cheap and easy, and indestructible. To move it I usually just roll it around.
 
Daron Williams
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Nice Travis! I'm going to be using an old mailbox to make a little mini-shed for a food forest so I can store some basic tools. Like you said it is nice to have the tools close by and using salvaged materials and re-purposing existing structures is always a good idea when you can do it. Thanks for sharing!
 
Daron Williams
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The "beaver pond" I made last year and improved this year is just the start of a new water system that I'm slowly developing. My hope is to one day be able to store around 100,000 gallons of water on my wild homestead as surface water when the whole system is full. Much more would be stored in the ground and of course the system would fill up and then the water would soak into the ground multiple times throughout a given year. Ultimately this means the water system would store far more than 100,000 gallons of water over the course of a year.

Doing all of this will require swales, ponds, mulch pits, and adding meanders and pools to my seasonal stream. Some of these are very large tasks and others are fairly small. Last weekend I took on one of the smaller tasks--digging some new pools and a new meandering channel for my seasonal stream. Attached are some pictures showing this work--one of the pictures shows the old stream channel in yellow and the new path of the water is marked with blue.

I'm going to need to dig out the pools after it all goes dry next summer and improve the edges of the new channel/pools plus eventually I want to add rocks to enhance the new waterfalls and prevent erosion. But even without that work the new channel with its pools and waterfalls are already holding a fair bit of water and bringing a lot of beauty to the land. Plus I just love hearing the sound of that the waterfalls make--the falling water also helps to add oxygen to the water!

I have already found frogs using the new pools!

Eventually, I want to do this sort of work in between a series of medium to large ponds. Together this will hold a lot of water and add a large amount of "edge" to the stream.

I might do some more digging this weekend. If I do I will post some updates!
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A sketch showing some future work I plan to do. This will involve expanding an existing pool and adding a new channel to the stream.
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Looking downstream from the work I just did this picture shows what the stream looked like before I did my work. Just disappears in the grass.
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Old channel in yellow and the new marked in blue.
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Just a picture showing the work as it currently stands. lots of work left to do around the edges of the pools and in the pools once they go dry in the summer.
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I love the new waterfalls! Later I want to improve these with rocks.
 
Diane Kistner
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Daron Williams wrote:Doing all of this will require swales, ponds, mulch pits, and adding meanders and pools to my seasonal stream. Some of these are very large tasks and others are fairly small. Last weekend I took on one of the smaller tasks--digging some new pools and a new meandering channel for my seasonal stream. Attached are some pictures showing this work--one of the pictures shows the old stream channel in yellow and the new path of the water is marked with blue.



Daron, it is so helpful to me to see how you have drawn the lines on the existing photos. I have a very hard time visualizing what to do, and these pictures are worth a thousand words!

About those mulch pits. Can you elaborate on how you do those?
 
Daron Williams
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Glad those pics help! At the moment I only have 1 mulch pit but I may be installing more later on. The one I have captures water that flows off a dirt road I share with my neighbors. At times a lot of water flows into it.

Basically the mulch pit is just a big hole I dug into the ground with a ramp leading water into it, a berm around one side of it, and a spillway for excess water to flow out into a field. Eventually I want to have this spillway direct the water into a series of swales/ponds.

Once the hole was dug I just filled it with mulch up to the level of the spillway. I have willows growing around it that I planted at the edge of the mulch line.

I like mulch pits for capturing water from sources like the road that might not be clean. Seems to work well and I plan to build one more that will capture water from my driveway during large rain events. The new mulch pit once I built it will be connected to a rain garden area. When the rain garden fills up the excess water will flow out and into the mulch pit through a pipe that will go under one of my hugelkultur hedgerows. If the mulch pit fills up the water will slowly flow out over my eco-lawn. But that would take a ton of rain--likely record breaking rainfall.
 
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