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Do any of you do ceramics?

 
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If so, do you have a kiln? And if not, do you go somewhere to get your things fired? I'm wondering because I just finished a ceramics class at my college, and I'd like to continue doing ceramics but I do not have a kiln and don't know where to find one.
 
                    
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Location: Bay Area, California (z8)
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Annah Isenberg wrote:If so, do you have a kiln? And if not, do you go somewhere to get your things fired? I'm wondering because I just finished a ceramics class at my college, and I'd like to continue doing ceramics but I do not have a kiln and don't know where to find one.



Look in local Adult School listings for Ceramics classes. Also, you can clay-fire in the backyard if you have enough space and DIYage.
 
Annah Rachel
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P Thickens wrote:

Annah Isenberg wrote:If so, do you have a kiln? And if not, do you go somewhere to get your things fired? I'm wondering because I just finished a ceramics class at my college, and I'd like to continue doing ceramics but I do not have a kiln and don't know where to find one.



Look in local Adult School listings for Ceramics classes. Also, you can clay-fire in the backyard if you have enough space and DIYage.



Oh, how do I fire in my backyard?
 
                    
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Location: Bay Area, California (z8)
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Annah Isenberg wrote: Oh, how do I fire in my backyard?



There are three ways I know of, but all of them have info on them on the Net. http://lmgtfy.com/?q=home+firing+ceramics
 
Annah Rachel
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thanks
 
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you could build one using bricks or better home made refractory bricks and a pile of sand in this Vietnamese technique. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anagama_kiln
I am building one this summer with refractory bricks. Clay mixed with straw, or dead leafs or sunflower seeds or rice (anything that will leave air bubble in the clay once fired. I would say straw scraps(small pieces) and rice or sunflower seeds would be better. the air bubble make it more isolating and keep your heat in.
 
pollinator
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The easiest stuff to fire in the yard is Raku. Check out bee hive kilns and salt glazing. Don't kill yourself with the chlorine gas that is given off.
 
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