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chicken manure

 
pollinator
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I have pumpkins in serious need of nitrogen.  One of the wounderful people on premies  pointed out everything I was using had a low N #.  Money is very tight now so buying something isn't going to happen.  I don't have finnished compost, except some bagged stuff, witch I have already tried, and don't drink coffee.  I do have chickens.  Is there a way to use the chicken manure that isn't very old with out burning my plants?  I thought of making a sort of tea out of it, but I don't have an air pump or bubblier, and again can't at this time go buy it. I was thinking water, chicken manure in a bucket for a few days.  What do you think?
 
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Location: Southwest Ohio (Currently)
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The soonest I've read about chicken manure being used on a garden was after 18 days of intense composting: https://saltinmycoffee.com/how-to-compost-chicken-manure-in-18-days/  . Unfortunately, it does require a lot of organic matter besides the actual manure. I hope someone has better information/experience in regard to your question.
 
gardener
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Established plants like pumpkin vines should be able to handle straight chicken manure, as long as you're not putting too much of it down.  Spread it around a bit -- don't put the poop right up next to the vine.

If you are still concerned, mix it with a carbon source (leaves, shredded paper, wood chips), wet it and let it sit for a few days, and then side-dress the plants with the manure/mulch mixture.

I use a deep litter system in the chicken coop -- about 6 inches of straw -- so when I clean that out and spread it around, it's pretty hot.  But I've not found it to burn anything.  I'm careful with small plants, but once plants are established, they do great with chicken manure mulch.

Let me recommend Gene Logsdon's book, "Holy Shit: Managing Manure to Save Mankind".  He talks extensively about the deep litter system of dealing with manure.  At one time, every farmer used to use this system to deal with accumulated manure in barns and chicken coops.  We've gotten away from it, and the results are horrible.  But if you can get your birds to crap directly onto your carbon source (typically, straw), then it's almost fool proof.

Best of luck.
 
pollinator
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Got pee?

If you don't take a bunch of pharmaceuticals, a 10:1 ratio of water:urine makes a good quick source of N. By quick, I mean fast acting but also doesn't last a long time but more can be made. Might do two doses a week or two apart. As far as how much to use, I don't really know but a web search will probably give you an answer
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=urine+water+mix+fertilizer&ia=web
 
Jen Fulkerson
pollinator
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I love it only on permies would pee be a good answer I'm grateful for.  Thanks
 
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YES! I second the pee suggestion! It's my go-to instant (FREE!) great source of nitrogen (and other necessary things) A great late season boost.  

In the meantime you could throw some chicken manure and chopped up fresh green comfrey, dandelion greens or even grass in a 5 gal. bucket with more urine...and fill with water. Stir it once a day and use that in a few days. I use nettles as well - but most folks don't have a nettle patch.  Add a tablespoon of molasses if you have some or a bit of juice from any fermented veggies you might have, and you have a lovely brew for a late season boost. I am using this on fall veggie starts. It's different than the ones made with a bubbler - but good nevertheless.
 
gardener
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hau Jen, lots of good suggestions have been made by others.

What I will add is about the chicken manure for the most part.
If you are talking about piles of droppings with no bedding mixed in, then you will want to mix those with water to dilute to a 15-20:1 dilution before use.
If you are talking about droppings that are mixed with a good amount of bedding, and that bedding has been in the coop for at least a month, then you would be fine using it as a top dressing (thin mulch layer).
Urine is best if diluted to a 10:1 ratio and used for deep watering.

Redhawk
 
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