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Pasture plant ID?

 
Posts: 112
Location: Appalachian Foothills-Zone 7
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I have a fair bit of this growing in my pasture.  The animals graze it, but do not eat it to the ground.  It seems to grow about knee high, but the height and growth habit are probably affected by the grazing.  The leaves, buds, and blossoms are very small. You can hardly tell when the blooms open.  It is very aromatic.
image.jpeg
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Gray Henon
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A closer pic.
image.jpeg
[Thumbnail for image.jpeg]
 
Gray Henon
Posts: 112
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Fairly woody stem, if that helps...
 
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Location: Switzerland / Uruguay
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maybe an "atriplex" variety?

you could google atriplex combined with the name your region..
 
pollinator
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Location: Ashhurst New Zealand
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I'm with Aaron. It's a chenopod of some sort, related to lamb's quarters or fathen. Could even be epazote. What is the aroma like?
 
pollinator
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All I know is that I likes high calcium soil. I say that because I mow the sides of the road and I often find it on the hills. That is because the soil adjacent to the road is always high in calcium where so much salt was spread to keep the snow and ice off the roadway so car and trucks can make it up the hill.

I would say if you want to get rid of it, you would need a fertilizer (manure) that was high in potash to make its growing conditions rather unfavorable. Grass easily outcompetes weeds when it has the right amounts of Lime/Sulphur and NPK. Getting one of those higher or lower than others, and a certain weed species will flourish.
 
Gray Henon
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Thanks everyone!  With the leadsI was able to narrow it down to Bush's Goosefoot!
 
Posts: 83
Location: California Zone 10b / Wyoming Zone 3b
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Sure looks like the epazote (Dysphania ambrosioides) I grow in my herb garden.  Very aromatic plant used in Mexican cooking, particularly cooked with beans.  Slightly toxic, it should not be consumed by nursing women or small kids.
 
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